Marlin Firearms Forum banner

61 - 80 of 80 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,401 Posts
Goodness I remember when in the trade picking up a large consignment of 1911s. Must have been fifty or so. All WW2 issue. I remember fishing out any not made by Colt. There were Remington's, a Union Switch and Signal and unless memory is playing tricks, a Singer. I may be mistaken about the last, not sure. All worth more money. I stripped and cleaned them, even played swichers with the grips. Some were damaged, some guns were better than others.

Had the same experience with a quantity of Browning HPs. WW2 vintage, mainly Canadian with the hump on the back of the slide. Some adjustable rear sight ones, made for the Chinese I think. Then one or two that looked more modern and had Nazi stamps. Turned out the Germans made them under occupation. How they ended up in the same lot, I have no idea?
If I'm not mistaken the Singer 1911 is one of the more rare ones. Made by a sewing company. Too cool!
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikom and msharley

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,474 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Reload and mikom

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,530 Posts
I'm going to get rid of all my hammers. After all, the original design is thousands of years old! LOL!

Luisyamaha
Luis,

Yeah,...........I just got finished getting rid of the wheels on my vehicles, too..................who needs anything that dates back to the Stone Age?............

Once the wheels are gone, I'm turning my attention to Ax'es, Hatchets and Firewood!.............Those tools aren't safe, and the wood pollutes the Ozone.........by today's standards............

Oh, Boy.............I must be Bored in all this rain!

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,748 Posts
When John M Browning first submitted his pistols for testing, they fired a .45 caliber 200 grain bullet at 930-950 FPS. The government testers liked his pistols, they knew the design was promising, but asked Browning for more bullet weight. On his next designs, he upped the weight to 230 grains, and dropped the velocity a little. The Small Arms Testing Board liked the cartridge better.

Maybe our younger members aren't familiar with the Thompson-LaGarde Handgun Lethality tests of 1904. It's very interesting, definitely not PC, the tests could never be conducted today. Thompson shot live cattle and human bodies from the Morgue with various Military handgun cartridges from around the World. Give it a read if you're not familiar. I have a complete copy in my library.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
I suppose it depends on your definition of "outdated". I would define that as some design that doesn't work as well as newer designs: a '54 Ford PU doesn't have anti-lock disc brakes, doesn't have syncromesh gears, gets poorer gas mileage with less power, etc. - it is outdated . Newer guns are made from newer materials, these have their benefits, but also their drawbacks: polymers guns are lighter weight, but that isn't always a plus. They are made along newer designs, these also have their benefits and drawbacks: striker fired have quicker lock times, but the triggers aren't as smooth or as light. There are plenty of new designs that are also single-action only, so that idea isn't obsolete. The 1911 is, admittedly, an old design, but certain not outdated nor obsolete, it still works just fine.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Reload and 1022

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Well, I’m a little outdated myself.

454CFC6B-2874-45AD-81D2-9111F1ADC201.jpeg
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,530 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,072 Posts
The man who wrote that article is either an ignorant fool or was just trying to stir the pot for reader comments and page views.

He pooh-poohs the 1911 because it comes chambered in .45 acp. But in doing so he ignores that it also is chambered in 9mm, .38 Super, .40, 10mm. What he really is doing is extolling the 9mm cartridge over the .45 acp. That argument is not pistol dependent with the exception that many pistols made in 9mm are incapable of being converted to shooting .45 cartridges. His argument not only fails in that regard but, rather, lands in support of the 1911.

The writer is a proponent of large capacity magazines. Yes, there is a significant difference in how many cartridges some autos carry. But any comparison needs to be for a set cartridge. Comparing a 15 round plastic 9mm auto to an 8 round 1911 in .45 is not the same as comparing it to a 10 round 1911 in 9mm. Then he also ignores the advantages and disadvantages of double stacked magazines vs single stacked magazines. Is he not aware that there have been and still are 1911s made that use double stack magazines? The Remington 1911 A2, for example, uses a magazine that holds 18 rounds of 9mm. Conversely, many of the plastic high capacity double stack 9mm autos are also available in single stack versions. But, to make his argument, the author only considered single stack .45 acp 1911s to double stack 9mm autos. He cherry picked what he wanted to compare and avoided comparing autos with like characteristics. In a legitimate comparison the magazine capacity argument does not disfavor the 1911 pistol design.

Something the author failed to compare is material of manufacture. Aluminum alloys and plastics have neither the strength nor service life of steels. You may hear arguments to the contrary but they are poorly advised and counterintuitive. If the "service life" of a pistol meets its design or military procurement specification then that's fine. The 9mm M9 did but only because the US specified a 6000 round service life in the original ORD (Operational Requirements Document). That was sufficient for most military personnel with jobs that only required firing about 60 rounds a year for familiarization and qualification. But it fell far short of meeting the requirements of Special Operations units and Infantry units. For example, I remember firing about 300 rounds in various drills in one day on the range and doing that several times a year. As required, alloy frames of the M9 did last for more than 6000 rounds, some as much as 10,000 or so. But after a few years of heavy use frames began cracking. Improvements were made to reduce cracking and increase service life. Army Special Operations Command (ARSOC) had Rangers, Special Forces, and other units undergo a 100% turn-in and replacement of ALL M9 pistols. Most of the turn-ins were discovered to already have cracks and/or were on the verge of catastrophic failure. The M9 improvements were marginally successful but even the improved M9 couldn't last anywhere near as long or take anywhere near the abuse that the 1940s or 1950s manufactured 1911s did. After the initial M9 shortcommings were discovered procedures were established to perform periodic inspections and scheduled replacements.

As to plastic pistols, they still use metal components for all high stress and high pressure parts. We know why. ALL plastics degrade over time. They will crack, flake, peel, and disintegrate. Exposure to environmental extremes, harsh chemicals, and abrasion increases the rate of decomposition. It's not a matter of if but when. Only recently have specialty plastics been developed that can last for several decades. But even those will decompose long before any metal parts will give up the ghost. Regardless, high tech plastics are usually more expensive than more common plastics and often they cannot be used for all the same applications. If a plastic auto lasts and performs properly for its service life then it has fulfilled its raison d'être. Just don't expect it to be a pistol to hand down for generations or to remain in hard military use for a decade.

I will say that the best argument the author made is that modern, "wonder nine", large capacity plastic pistols are less expensive than a well made steel 1911. That is true. But in the words of the late John J. Arbuckle, "You get what you pay for."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,837 Posts
What did you do to the spring plug? And Why? I am familiar with drilling drain holes, especially in service sidearms. Seen it on the BHP as well. Is that whats going on?
spring plug, drain holes???
If this Pistol is pointed at you, Smile the flash is about to appear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,469 Posts
Since my 1911's are compacts and obsolete (Colt and Detonics), and because they don't have a rail, I have to hold the flashlight, Swiss Army Knife and my sandwich with my off hand.

So yeah, magazine capacity can be an issue because quick magazine changes are out of the question. I need a third hand.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,174 Posts
To make it clear my comments on the 1911 were for Colts and GI issue. I know there are many top end clones as good or better. There are also clones that I wouldn't trust. I don't like plastic but would rather have a top end plastic like a Glock than some of the 1911 clones. The design of the 1911 is sound and proven but some of the clones are junk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,630 Posts
"The 1911 platform is a big, heavy, and expensive option compared to the rest of the market. I don’t doubt someone with a 1911 can defend themselves. However, I can do the same thing with a lighter, easier-to-carry weapon with double the capacity."

Methinks he like the high capacity because he misses a lot.
:dancing2:

Paul B.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,474 Posts
Some have mentioned jams, or 'stoppages' as we call them here. Another great thing about the 1911 is that while rare on a maintained pistol with good ammo, they can be cleared quickly. When qualifying on the 1911, on your side of the pond I was taught quick and simple clearance drills. For a failure to fire, the old 'slap rack bang', slap the bottom of the mag, rack, or cycle the slide and fire. Another stoppage, very rare but can happen was the stovepipe. A failure to eject and the spent case is stuck sticking up out of the slide like a chimney. Just wipe it clear with the other hand. A firm stroke across the top of the slide. Having said all that, I have been through a dozen 1911A1s, from Commanders to Government models. From light weights to full weights. From 10mm, .45 and 9mm. Jams were very, very rare. But then, I tend to clean and lightly lube my guns regularly. I also tend to check for wear, anything that looks wrong.

Maybe some dont bother. Maybe some dont look after their sidearm and then expect it to look after them. A gun can be like a woman (Or man if your a woman). If your not prepared to look after it, dont be surprised or complain if it lets you down. Your fault.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,630 Posts
I will have my seven 1911's till I leave this planet.:adore:
 
61 - 80 of 80 Posts
Top