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Good evening,

I am posting here to hopefully learn a bit more about a gun I got yesterday. From what I can tell the latest patent date on the barrel is 1904. Also engraved on the barrel is the Marlin Address, 25-20 M, and Special Smokeless Steel. I would first like to know general information if anyone has any as well as proper storage to maintain its condition, and if it would be recommended to shoot (which style ammo, etc)

Thank you in advance, you all have been very kind and helpful so far. I am just starting out collecting, I started with Civil War pieces and I have slowly been branching out. I am just 28 and still very new to everything involving antique guns. I also just purchased a lot of around 35 pistols, long rifles, blunderbusses, swords, etc so any additional general handling or maintenance tips would also be greatly appreciated.

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Looks like a Model 27S and appears to be original great condition too!
The model started out as the model 27 in 1909, and with the improved safety as the 27S in about 1911. It was made up to WWI, and again after the war until 1932. The calibers were .25-20, .32-20, and .25 Rim Fire.
The model 27/27S was around longer than any other Marlin pump action rifle. They are very solid guns, and have a good reputation for quality, although they were never a high dollar item, they are quite desirable today!.
These guns were available in either full octagon or round barrels, of 24" length. Special sights, checkering, and engraving were optional on earlier guns, but post WWI era guns tend to have no special options, except sights. Only straight grip models were made.
If you removed the tang sight screws , you'll find the model designation underneath the sight on the top tang.
The 27 was designed by John Marlin and LL Hepburn.

Cleaning and oiling are a good idea, and the 27 is not a tough gun to take down for maintenance. All old guns should be carefully cleaned and lightly oiled. With your big purchase, you've got a fair number of days of cleaning and oiling ahead!
 

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Thank you both for your responses. I'm going to have to pick up a book on maintenance and oiling. As I stand right now I am too afraid to start unscrewing or oiling anything on any weapon before I feel comfortable in what I am doing. There is a Harrington and Richardson revolver and some Spanish revolver, I will probably practice on those first as my research so far tells me one was sold at Sears and Spanish revolvers suck. Thanks again for all of the useful info!
 
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