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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What can I do to ease up the trigger some :( Without a scale I would have to guesse 6 to 7 lbs of pull :shock: Way to heavy for any type of decent work :?
 

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Replace the hammer spring with a lighter weight Wolff one. Did that on mine and the trigger pull is definitely lighter and so is the lever action. I don't have a way to measure pull weight, so can't tell you how much was the improvement. Tried it at the range a few days ago and had some misfires, but the rangemaster said the rims seemed as impacted as those that did fire and blamed the ammunition (Blazer) and not the lighter firing pin impact. As I didn't have any other bullet brand with me, it'll have to wait until my next trip to the range to be sure. Brownell's has the spring. Part # 969-000-108 $7.49.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
luisyamaha said:
Replace the hammer spring with a lighter weight Wolff one. Did that on mine and the trigger pull is definitely lighter and so is the lever action. I don't have a way to measure pull weight, so can't tell you how much was the improvement. Tried it at the range a few days ago and had some misfires, but the rangemaster said the rims seemed as impacted as those that did fire and blamed the ammunition (Blazer) and not the lighter firing pin impact. As I didn't have any other bullet brand with me, it'll have to wait until my next trip to the range to be sure. Brownell's has the spring. Part # 969-000-108 $7.49.
Thanks for the info , think I'll give it a try :D
 

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Do you think you can loop or tie a string on your trigger and tie to a soda bottle [2 liter] and carefully fill with H2O....when the hammer falls remove the water bottle and weigh it...ergo the trigger pull....I think?

.............TM7
 

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TM7 said:
Do you think you can loop or tie a string on your trigger and tie to a soda bottle [2 liter] and carefully fill with H2O....when the hammer falls remove the water bottle and weigh it...ergo the trigger pull....I think?

.............TM7
Some of the guys at RFC have done it this way. Can't see why it wouldn't work. I'd think it would be a good idea to have the bottle a short distance off the floor. Make sure you have an EMPTY shell or snap cap in the chamber to keep the firing pin from hitting on an empty chamber.
 

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I was going to do that. :oops: I actually have weights I can attach and measure. :D However, in the excitement of actually having some time again to mess around with guns, :D I forgot to measure the original trigger pull. :oops: When I remembered I had already installed the Wolff spring and was "finger testing" it. Not knowing I would soon write about it, I just skipped it. :lol:

After my few failures to fire with the Blazers, I'm holding back on the trigger pull measurement until I get back to the range and test the rifle with other ammo. When I get back from that range session, I'll measure the pull with the Wolff, and I'll replace the original again and measure that. If everything works well, I'll put the Wolff back in. I might as well have some cleaning to do when I take the rifle apart! :wink:

Besides, who knows, I might find something else to polish or whatever, and I'll need the comparison data. :wink:

Will keep you posted.
 

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BTW, forgot in the previous post, the cross safety does not allow the hammer to hit the firing pin at all on those rifles that have it. So it seems OK to put on the safety and pull the trigger on an empty chamber. The firing pin isn't going to hit anything. 8)
This might not be true for the older models of 1897's and 39A's without the cross(bolt?) safety. 8)
 

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luisyamaha said:
BTW, forgot in the previous post, the cross safety does not allow the hammer to hit the firing pin at all on those rifles that have it. So it seems OK to put on the safety and pull the trigger on an empty chamber. The firing pin isn't going to hit anything. 8)
This might not be true for the older models of 1897's and 39A's without the cross(bolt?) safety. 8)
luisyamaha is correct. I was only thinking of TM7's vintage '54 Mountie when I posted that. Brain Cramp on my part :oops:
 

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I had heard that disabling the rebouning hammer "feature" could help with the trigger, but upon examining the works, I couldn't see how it would make a difference. However, with some more thought, it occured that this would allow a lighter hammer spring since it doesn't have to overcome the backpressure as it approaches the firing pin. This may be insignificant, though. OTOH, you could shim the spring with washers until the light hits go away.
 

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I saw one of these yesterday with beautiful feather-crotch wood for 549.00. Is this the going rate for the 1897Texan? I was very tempted because I'd never seen a recent production Marlin with wood like that.
 

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I paid $655.00 for mine last March. I live in Puerto Rico, and everything here is more expensive. 6.6% excise tax, shipping and $50.00 registration fee. I looked all over the internet at the time and the cheapest going rate I found was around $550.00-$575.00. I bought local as the numbers came out better and I was dealing with somebody I knew. To be tempted to buy on-line I would have needed it to be considerably cheaper.

Good luck!
 

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msj348 said:
I saw one of these yesterday with beautiful feather-crotch wood for 549.00. Is this the going rate for the 1897Texan? I was very tempted because I'd never seen a recent production Marlin with wood like that.
In March 2003, I paid $523.79 out the door for mine from a local dealer. He had to order it in, as he didn't have one in stock. Since these are no longer produced, the price you saw may be as good as it gets.

As for the wood; Seems like it's luck of the draw with Marlin. My 1897T is about as plain as it gets. My 1897CB is close to as fancy as my 1897CL.

I agree with Luisyamaha about buying online. I like to see it in person before I lay down my cash.
 

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Went ahead today and tried measuring trigger pull on the 1897 T. :?

The way I did it was to bend a piece of metal coat hanger to hang on the trigger, with the rifle vertical, and a hook on the other end that could be put under the handle on a 1-gallon plastic bottle. The rifle was then lifted with increasing amounts of water in the bottle until the trigger broke. Both the last amount that woulnd't break the trigger and the one that did are offered, as I did this in 8 oz. increments. The bottle was calibrated in fluid ounces from 32 oz. every 16 oz. all the way to the top 128 oz. The weight of the bottle and the coat hanger (8") was not factored in. But I guess it at no more than 1-2 oz. The fluid ounces were converted to weight by a factor of .066. 128 oz.= 8.45 lbs. One gallon of fresh water weighs 8.448 lbs. 8)

The 1897 T with the Wolff spring would't break with 2.64 lbs. and broke always with 3.17 lbs. With the original spring the numbers were 4.75 lbs. and 5.28 lbs. That's about a 40% reduction in pull weight. (+ -). :lol: The effort to cock the rifle is also less, probably by the same amount, (its the same spring) but it is an arc and difficult to measure by myself. :oops:

As an aside, my 1984 SS has a pull weight between 3.17 and 3.70, with the original spring, just some polishing here and there, no sear work. Thats not bad for a stock factory rifle! :eek:

Since I had the bottles and everything, I measured the weight on a CZ-75(5.28-5.81), a Ruger Mk II .22 (4.23-4.75), and a Kimber .45 Stainless Gold Match (3.70-4.23). :wink:

I will do this with all my guns in the future to have as reference.
The trigger on the Kimber and Ruger FEEL lighter than those of the rifles, but it isn't so. Maybe the straight gripped stock of the Marlins does not give as much leverage to the shooter's finger as the pistols grip?

Anyhow, it has been interesting. Your results may vary! :cry:
 

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Definitively the problem was the Blazer .22 ammo. :oops: Test fired the rifle with RWS amtch ammo, S&B Club, and some very old Remington ammo somebody gave me. No failures of any kind. 8) Tried 10 shots with the Blazer and had two mis-fires (never fired, even with repeated hammer blows) ant two failures to eject (those had fired). :( Had also some failures to fire in my Ruger MK.II with the same ammo. :shock:

So now I'm going to order the same spring for my 1894, as it is the same. :lol:
 
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