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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took my previously stone cold reliable 1894 in 38sp/357 mag out for some shooting a couple of weeks ago. Right off the bat, the very first round did not feed-did not lift into place. Shook it out and tried again-worked fine for about 2 refills of the mag. On last shot out of last mag, it was VERY much louder than before. I was shooting some mixed 38 and 357 that I had bought at a swap meet. I had separated the two types and was shooting the 38 first and figured I must have missed a 357. Ejected the brass and inspected it. Turns out it was a 38special p+. After that the lifter would not raise shells into place. Only moves a small bit. I am thinking the problem must have already existed before I shot the p+ due to it not lifting the very first round I tried. Maybe the p+ finished off whatever problem that was developing?? Does a p+ develop more power than a 357 magnum??

Anyway, the real question now- pretty much impossible to see in the receiver to tell what is going on in there. I found page in the Marlin history book that shows all of the internal parts out of the receiver. Not much help without seeing how they interact with one another when in motion. Hoping to find some time to tear into rifle this weekend. Anybody had this happen?? Any advice on what components to focus my attentin on??
 

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It sounds to me like the retaining washer, that secures the plunger in place, is coming off or has come off.

Be cautious because the plunger and spring are small and if they get lost, you will have to buy a replacement from Slick McClade for $25.

He is THE ONLY person that has these parts because the factory won't sell them separately.

Anyhow, if this is the problem and you still have the plunger and spring, you can secure them back in place with a 1/8" eclip.

Without actually looking at your 1894, this is my best guess, atleast until somebody post a better guess..... :)

EDIT: does the lifter (carrier) only stick when ammo is in the magtube? Will it rise when the gun is empty?


..........Widder
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No. The arm will not raise even when empty. I did pull the lever and bolt this morning for a quick look. Cartridge lifter can be pushed through its range of motion with a small screwdriver. Does hang up slightly in one spot. Almost feels like it is meant to though. Almost like a spring loaded detent in there somewhere. Parts picture does not show any such thing as far as I can tell. No significant slopin lifter pivot either. No blatantly obvious signs of severe wear that would cause such a thing.

Can you give me a desctiption of the plunger, spring and retaining washer you are talking about?? Where are they located, and what is their function??
 

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DEF..

I should have ask earlier.....how old is your 1894?

If it has a pivoting bar on the left side of the carrier, that is different than the plunger info I gave above.

Anyhow, you will have to remove the carrier (lifter) to see the plunger. Its in the side of the carrier and on the left side is the 'stud' and on the right side is the retaining washer, assuming it hasn't come off.
and inside the body of the carrier is the spring.

its purpose is to allow the carrier to pivot upwards during the closing (or upward stroke) of the lever.

I will be home on Saturday evening after my Cowboy Action Shoot today. Feel free to call me if you like.

Its easier to talk about these things and help you learn more about it over the phone.

865 / 984-4455 in E.TN

best regards


..........Widder
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mine is a 78 model from when I ran the numbers if I remember correctly. Finally got around to tearing it down a bit more this morning and shure enough, it is the plunger. Mine fits into a recess in the lifter with a pin running through it to retain it. The exposed tip of the plunger was broken off, bit still in place. "plunger" the tecnically correct term, or just what you have come yo call it?? Want to know theproper terminology to make finding a new one a bit easier.
 

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Mine is a 78 model from when I ran the numbers if I remember correctly. Finally got around to tearing it down a bit more this morning and shure enough, it is the plunger. Mine fits into a recess in the lifter with a pin running through it to retain it. The exposed tip of the plunger was broken off, bit still in place. "plunger" the tecnically correct term, or just what you have come yo call it?? Want to know theproper terminology to make finding a new one a bit easier.
There are two carrier styles, it sounds from this post that you've got the earlier one. From a conversation I had with another guy on another forum, I think some of the later production of these was done with powder metallurgy, may not be as robust as ones machined from solid or forgings. But it's worked for 35+ years. If you have a spring loaded lever pivoted in a pocket of the carrier, this is the earlier style, this is the "rocker". Bad news is that parts for these are hard to find. That style of carrier probably hasn't been made in 30 years. Numrich/Gun Parts is worth a look, but their pile of original parts is rapidly being reduced. Last I looked, they had just the rocker, and that's been several years back. The later carrier will fit and shouldn't take a lot of fitting to get working. This style is the one the other posters are talking about, it's a single piece precision casting(if original Marlin) and has a spring-loaded pin riveted in a recess in the side that takes the place of the separate rocker. I've had these lose the riveted retaining ring and the pin come out, the results are the same, the carrier doesn't work anymore.

Since Remlington took over, carriers for the .357s in particular have been hard to find. Supposedly production for the 1894 is going on now, so they might be getting some into the spare parts bins. If you can't find a new-style spare from the usual places, Numrich or Brownell's, you might hit up Remington to see what they have. They've been getting nasty about supplying some parts to the general gun-owning public, will want the gun sent back, asking might not be successful, but worth a try. Under NO circumstances would I send a gun to Remlington... Supposedly, Remlington is CNC-machining these from solid now instead of using the precision casting. Probably the subcontractor that supplied the castings is OOB or Remlington didn't save that part of the tooling during the move.

If you can't get a rocker or a new-style carrier, the alternatives get kind of grim. If it's powder metallurgy, the part may not be repairable with welding. If the thing broke and you've still got the nub around somewhere, it might be fixable by silver brazing or a good guy with a torch or TIG might be able to build up the nub using nickel braze. It's a fairly small part and a replacement rocker could be probably filed and drilled out from ground flat stock and hardened and tempered afterwards. Wouldn't be worth it if you had to pay someone to do it, but a handy fellow with a drill press and some files could get it done in short order. Wouldn't need a heavy mill to do that.

Stan S.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Came up with nothing at Brownells, but Numrich is showing a 357 cartier assembly available as of yesterday. I would assume that "assembly" means one with everything attached, so I should probably take a chance on it and order it. Figured worst case scenario, I make my own from scratch if it comes down to it.
 

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Came up with nothing at Brownells, but Numrich is showing a 357 cartier assembly available as of yesterday. I would assume that "assembly" means one with everything attached, so I should probably take a chance on it and order it. Figured worst case scenario, I make my own from scratch if it comes down to it.
"Assembly" is what you get with the new-style carrier. No separate parts are available. Drop-in, ready to go. The old-style one had separate parts that could be replaced. Hop on it before they're gone. For some reason, carriers are a hot part, particularly for .357. Marlin used to make enough spares to keep up, I never saw them out of stock until Remlington took over.

Stan S.
 
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