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hey yall, had my 1894cst for a few weeks now. I've noticed the rims of both .38 and .357 catch on the inside of the receiver on the mouth of the magazine tube. Takes some finagling to get the round to actually go into the tube. Should I take a dremel to the mouth and give it a chamfer? Any recommendations?

Pic of the gun disassembled to show what its doing

 

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All kinds. Enamored of their mechanisms!
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I'm no Marlin Guru but it seems to me that the lifter 'lips' should align the rim to slide in without a hitch. I would think that sharp edge of the entry hole in the receiver and or the tube could stand some radiusing and polish. The machine work that is visible looks great other than that sharp edge.

Is this a Remington made gun?

AC
 

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I'm no Marlin Guru but it seems to me that the lifter 'lips' should align the rim to slide in without a hitch. I would think that sharp edge of the entry hole could stand some radiusing and polish. The machine work that is visible looks great. Is this a Remington made gun?

AC
I may just slightly polish it and maybe a very slight chamfer it and go from there. Same issue when its fully assembled. Seems .38 isn't as bad, but could just be me.

Yes. Its a 1894cst. Got it about a month ago. And the dealer I got it from had just received it from marlin the day before.

Action is a little rough, so probably needs some polishing as well. Only thing I've done to it has been put a ranger point loading gate, trigger and medium loop and put on a full length xs sight rail. Otherwise its stock.
 

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How much larger than the rim of that .357 is that hole through the receiver? It looks significantly bigger in the photo? Could that passage be too big, like for a .44 mag instead of for a .357?
 

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Welcome, and sorry about your situation. That would be a tough call for me. But, I would probably contact Marlin. I understand that some people have very little faith in Marlin, and I have not had to return a firearm yet. But, that particular one would be a candidate.
 

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If new production I'd talk to Marlin first. Might be a simple fix from them. Otherwise a chamfer could help but there should be something in the mechanism to align the round into the tube. Apparently it isn't doing its job.
V
 

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if its a new gun and its not right send it back unless your gonna customize it and if you don't know what your doing send it to someone who does. ive seen my share ofd bubberized guns and each time just shake my head and wonder why would anyone do such a thing to a perfectly fine firearm.
 

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I might add it a real nice picture you took but is not representative of loading a tube fed lever gun when all the guts are removed from receiver. one thing to think about. if you take a Dremel to the receiver and bugger it up, you gotta buy another gun to get a receiver and these days it also seems impossible to get a new bolt. just saying. I guess I got such strong opinion after spending a boatload of money to buy some very hard to find marlin rifles when I got them and started looking at what I bought one of them a nearly perfect looking, on the outside, 1894 sporter , not a real common configuration, someone had customized the bolt with a Dremel cutter, new ugly incorrect slot cut into it, its obvious, its ugly and unnecessary damage and can't find a new bolt anywhere, ill have to spend at least a few hundred dollars to buy a parts gun when I'm able to find one in order to get another bolt.
 

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hey yall, had my 1894cst for a few weeks now. I've noticed the rims of both .38 and .357 catch on the inside of the receiver on the mouth of the magazine tube. Takes some finagling to get the round to actually go into the tube. Should I take a dremel to the mouth and give it a chamfer? Any recommendations?

Pic of the gun disassembled to show what its doing

Just a lurker here.

You are onto the problem, Dakatastomm. I bought a new Remlin 1894 CSBL .357 magnum back in January and came across the same problem you have.

That Dangernoodle speed loading video shows how and where to chamfer that opening in the receiver. The trick is to only chamfer the ammo entry side of the receiver hole even though the Dremel is reaching through from the mag tube side. Do not do any Dremel work in the "tunnel" of the receiver behind the chamfer area. Just to be clear, the loading gate isn't causing this problem and should essentially be left alone. Just chamfer the side of the entry of the "tunnel" where your photo shows the .357 mag rim getting caught.

The carrier seems like it should help ammo get through that area, but the carrier has rounded "ears" and the rim of a cartridge shifts to the left side of the receiver when that cartridge clears the ears of the carrier. Which is right before the cartridge makes it through the tunnel to the magazine tube.

Anyway, go slow and easy with the Dremel. I did this work on my 1894 CSBL back in January because loading the gun was such a problem that the gun wasn't range ready until I took care of the issue. Now my 1894 CSBL loads slick and easy, all the way to full mag capacity*.

*Clipped 5 inches from the rifle length magazine spring, too. Works better in 16.5" barreled mag tubes making it easier to top off to the spec'd eight .357 cartridges.
 

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How much larger than the rim of that .357 is that hole through the receiver? It looks significantly bigger in the photo? Could that passage be too big, like for a .44 mag instead of for a .357?
Yeah, all that space to the right of the cartridge in the receiver is because that opening is angled on that side to allow ammo to pass from the loading gate into the tunnel in the receiver. Basically it's cut to be a funnel, but on the right side only.

I have a theory about the magazine tube tunnel in the receiver of .357 1894s versus .44 1894s, and this theory is based on reports that .357 guns are much more fidgety to load than .44 or .45 guns.

I'm guessing that due to the larger cartridge diameter of .44/.45 1894s that the left side of the magazine tube tunnel is closer to the left receiver wall. While .357 1894s are cut with the magazine tube tunnel a touch further away from the left receiver wall. If this is true, then a rim of a .44/.45 would be supported by the left receiver wall allowing the cartridge rim to ease into the tunnel much easier.

The thing is, I don't have a .44 magnum 1894 to take apart to take a look see. Perhaps someone else has one apart right now and could compare it to the pic posted by Dakatostomm?
 

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Here's a before and after view of my 1894. You can see how the chamfer work gets the tunnel opening closer to the left side of the receiver.

tunnel-before.jpg

tunnel-after.jpg

The gun in question below.
1894-357-postoak.jpg
 

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Don't step on your dangernoodle by grinding away too much metal with the Dremel. Once it's gone you can't put it back. Go real, real slow and check the function often. A thousandth here and a thousandth there might be all that's needed.

Be careful. It's easy to take out too much with a Dremel. Ask me how I know.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Here's a before and after view of my 1894. You can see how the chamfer work gets the tunnel opening closer to the left side of the receiver.

View attachment 813833

View attachment 813835

The gun in question below.
View attachment 813837
Been a couple days but was finally able to get around to channeling my inner bubba and firing up the dremel. It did slip once or twice so have some unsightly spots where the tool hit where I didnt want it to, but I was able to get it to a point where the rounds no longer catch and loading ammo is effortless.

I still need to disassemble and actually start to polish everything but it seems my demel polishing kit has grown legs and walked off. So thats a project for another day.


 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just a lurker here.

You are onto the problem, Dakatastomm. I bought a new Remlin 1894 CSBL .357 magnum back in January and came across the same problem you have.

That Dangernoodle speed loading video shows how and where to chamfer that opening in the receiver. The trick is to only chamfer the ammo entry side of the receiver hole even though the Dremel is reaching through from the mag tube side. Do not do any Dremel work in the "tunnel" of the receiver behind the chamfer area. Just to be clear, the loading gate isn't causing this problem and should essentially be left alone. Just chamfer the side of the entry of the "tunnel" where your photo shows the .357 mag rim getting caught.

The carrier seems like it should help ammo get through that area, but the carrier has rounded "ears" and the rim of a cartridge shifts to the left side of the receiver when that cartridge clears the ears of the carrier. Which is right before the cartridge makes it through the tunnel to the magazine tube.

Anyway, go slow and easy with the Dremel. I did this work on my 1894 CSBL back in January because loading the gun was such a problem that the gun wasn't range ready until I took care of the issue. Now my 1894 CSBL loads slick and easy, all the way to full mag capacity*.

*Clipped 5 inches from the rifle length magazine spring, too. Works better in 16.5" barreled mag tubes making it easier to top off to the spec'd eight .357 cartridges.
I did end up clipping my spring off by about 4 inches or so. That greatly improved the ability to load rounds in as well. Before I did, I really struggled to get the last round in.
 

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I guess that is the problem Hammer Down ammo is supposed to solve.
Now that is interesting and something I didn't know that existed until now.

Also interesting how the article below claims the ammo was developed for Henry and their newly introduced King's gate lever guns. Makes me think Henry doesn't want to do extra receiver work either, same as Marlin in this regard. Just sell premium ammo instead of making the gun right from the get-go.

https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2020/01/22/shot-2020-federal-premium-hammerdown-lever-action-ammunition-line/
 
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