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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,
I am planning on polishing the actions of my 2 1894's and my 39A. I have found and printed off a copy of Marauder's post on doing this. I was looking at my breech bolt and I noticed rough machining marks on the flats on 3 sides. Do these machining marks have to be polished smooth like a mirror to do this right or lightly polished as to remove most of blueing? It seems like Marlin could do some extra polishing on the bolts if this is necessary to get the action slick. I know I don't want to remove any factory engravings on the bolt, ie the serial # and such. Another question is, Is the reduced power spring kit by wolff springs worth putting in the gun to help slicken it up, or will it cause FTF's? Any tips or ideas? Dan
 

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If you remove the machine marks, you will have created a lot of clearance in the bolt fit. Polishing does not remove noticeable amounts of metal.
 

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OOPS, I heard my name.

Howdy Awful Close. Hopefully this cold weather will be gone soon and I'll get to shoot with ya.....maybe at Cleveland this month.

Anyhow, back to the inquiry about polishing, etc...

It can be tricky in certain ways. You want your metal to metal tolerances to help keep the action smooth and sure, yet you want to also eliminate burrs and such.

You can remove metal without a high polish and still help smooth up an action.

AND, you can polish a burr till it looks like a mirror but it will still be a burr.

What you want to eliminate are those areas that have a noticable burr and those areas that are causing a 'harsh' friction surface.

You can get a metal removing polish by using 300 grit paper.

You can get a minimal metal removing higher polish by using 600 grit paper.

You can get a nice little shine and smooth out some burrs by also using 0000 steel wool pad.

And you can get a mirror shine by using 555 polishing compound (from Brownells) and a buffer wheel on a dremal tool.

Some areas can use a good high polish and some don't. Feel your gun with your finger tips or use a cotton swab. Cotton will catch on a burr that you normally won't see.

Use your flash lite and look for 'scratches' that constantly appear and see what sharp edge is causing it.

As far as springs go, Wolff is a good sorce for springs. I have also found that Longhunter (Cowboy shooter) has some of the best springs for the 1894. You should get 100% ignition using his springs unless you have some odd obstruction to keep your hammer from falling freely.

ALSO, I would use the little washer that comes with the kit for one reason. It helps keep your spring from riding over the 'collar' on your hammer strut. This isn't comething critical, but in Cowboy Action Shooting, it could happen to a point where you might get a weak hammer fall during a critical stage run.

Hope this helps. Your visiting Marauders website should be very beneficial to you.

Best regards

..........Widder
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input. Last night I did some polishing on my 39A, and I definitly can tell a big difference in the way the action works. The only way I'll know if I'm going to be satisfied with it is to take it out and shoot it, so now is the wait for warmer weather. Is it wise to use grease on the sides of the bolt that slides in the receiver? Dan
 

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When my 39A was brand new, 2008, the lever would hangup on the return trip to closed, unless I cycled real fast. I took it down and used a small real fine diamond hone on all the parts in the action, being careful not to go "hone crazy", just go over the heavy machinng marks to knock off sharp edged high spots. this is actually very slight, but you can see the smooth metal that you have hit. You might want to get a magnifier of some sort so you can really see what you're doing. I use one that fits on my head, it's amazing what you can see. I went over all the parts that appeared to be machined roughly and reasembled it with a tad of lithium grease (a tad) and shot around 500 rounds through it, broke it down cleaned it and now the action is considerably smoother. I do not grease this assembly anymore, just the one time. I agree with everyone about taking too much metal down in the honing process, be careful, a couple swipes over the rough spots ought to do it. The more I shoot it, the more smooth it gets!
The visor magnifier I use is called "Optivisor". If you have the opportunity to use one, it's amazing what you can see. Check your bore out with one.
Good luck
 
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