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OK, for someone who has owned an 1894c for many years this may seem a strange question, but I am curious. Do you, have you ever had any concerns with RNL in the tube? I use them, I never had a mag detonation, ever, but wondered if others agreed or had other opinions. Would you avoid RNL? Has anyone ever had a problem?
 
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30-30 Win is round nose so I can't see much difference...
 

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I have shot 158 gr RN hard cast from my 1894C with no problems.
 

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Nope I use a 200 grain Lee round nose bullet mold for my 357s and works like a champ.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Same results as I have had, no problems. Just curious. Obviously very pointy 'spitzer' types would be an issue. Not many of those in .357!
 

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Standard pressure and even normal +P .38 Special loads have light enough recoil that I wouldn't consider it a problem, but I would avoid loading LRN bullets in full-charge .357 Mag. loads if you were using more sensitive pistol primers versus the heavier cup Remington 5-1/2 or Federal 200, which are similar to a military 9mm or .30 M1 carbine primer.
 

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No problem.

The proscription is only to spire (pointy) tip bullets.

Even so, although detonations in the magazine tube have been re-created during testing, it took a lot of attempts and effort to cause a detonation.

Not only does the contact area need to be small enough to indent the primer, but the force of the impact must be sufficient to forcibly crush the primer pellet against the anvil with enough energy to detonate the priming compound.

For additional perspective, many reloaders routinely decap live primers in their decapping or resize dies without setting off the primers. I have done this hundreds of times without having a detonation. Wear eye protection and run the ram up slowly, of course. The primers are re-usable and can be reseated in different cases if desired.

The caveat here would be that I would only reuse these decapped primers for handgun ammo and practice rifle rounds. I wouldn't use them for competition or hunting, although I have never had one fail to go bang.
 

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I have a question. Has anybody ever seen or heard of magazine detonation from a reliable source EVER?
Yes.

When I visited the Marlin factory in New Haven, CT in the 1980s Bill Brophy showed me at least a dozen of them which had come into customer service.

I've also seen examples in Ruger .44 semi-auto carbines, when I worked for the company, which generated the Speer warning.
 

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The Speer 110gr Varmiter. HP .30cal also has tube magazine warning. I remember in 60s that Ruger 44mag carbines were having tube detonations from some special ammo made to penetrate vehicles.
 

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In over 50 years of shooting, I have not once, EVER heard or seen verifiable evidence of a magazine detonation, regardless of bullet type. I HAVE read numerous reports & watched a video as recently as yesterday of a test trying to set off .223 rounds. They subjected the gun to enough recoil force to shatter the buttplate and split the stock...nothing, nada. The rounds were housed in a clear tube of exact dimension of the stock round, and filmed in high speed slo motion. They barely twitch under the most severe impact.
when you think about the issue a bit; what business would EVER design & release a product that, if the end user did not use the recommended consumable (i.e. the right bullet design) would catastrophically fail? No One would; Certainly not a North American firearms manufacturer.
like everyone I heard all Kinds of “stories”over the years. When I started to really take lever guns seriously, perhaps 30 years ago, it never made sense to me that anyone would release an accident waiting to happen like that. I started researching as best you could before the internet, and with the web when it came into common use. Not ONE TIME did I ever find verifiable info of it happening randomly. A couple of time when it did, someone was actively Trying to get a detonation. Accidental, through normal use? Never seen ONE case of it
 

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Normally I use flat points but I've never never had a problem shooting round nosed ammo. I suppose if a primer was not seated well it could ignite on recoil. I doubt it but I'll allow the possibility.
 

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During the US Army trials in the early 1890's there were two magazine detonations in Marlin's 1881 lever action rifle. Marlin had submitted the rifles along with Marlin branded flat nose .45-70 ammunition, but the Army board ignored the Marlin ammunition and used standard issue .45-70-405 round nose for the tests. After the second tube detonation, the Marlin rifle was eliminated from the competition and not considered fit for adoption as standard issue repeating rifle.

These are documented tube detonations for those of you that seek proof, or doubt it can happen. It's in the official US Army records.
 

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Never say never, but I frequently shoot cast RN bullets in my Marlins, 32-20, 30-30, 357, 45C.
I was just yesterday shooting some black powder loads in my 357 CB with the lee TL-357-155 2r.
Not only is a RN blunt & soft lead, but the cartridge rim actually alings the bullet nose down to the edge of the primer.
TUK, that bullet works very well behind 15 gr of Swiss 2f.
 
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