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What are the differences between the Model 1893 (Model 93) and the Model 1895? I am referring to the old square bolts.

Eric
 

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The 1895 squarebolt action is longer and is chambered in heavier calibers. I'm thinking it might be a little taller as well, but not sure on that aspect.
 

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In a nutshell,The 1893 uses cartridges of the 30-30 case head size(32-40,32 spl,25-36) and the 1895 uses cartridges of the 45-70 case head
(40-65,38-56) size.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info. I was just kind of curious since with PJ's question on the 40-65 just got me thinking. I have been interested in that cartridge and knew it came in the old 1895. Since I only have a Model 93 and never seen or held a Model 1895 peeked a little interest. I didn't know if they were the same size frame just one beefier/higher grade steel than the other or the 1895 was actually larger in size.
 

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The old 1895 Marlins had a taller larger frame & were more beefed up to handle the
family of 45/70's on which the 1895 is based on. Back when they were produced
they were slow sellers because of their weight(most were over 10 lbs) & when the
30-06 was introduced that slowed production. Most hunters wanted more speed
then. Only 5000 1895's are recorded in the factory records. That is why they are
extremely hard to find now & if one is found in good condition it will command a
premium especially in 45-70 & 45-90. I know of 2 1895's 3 serial numbers apart
where there is a 2 year difference in the shipping dates. In other words the one
gun in this case a 40-82 round barrel sat in the warehouse 2 years before someone
bought it. That is why the 1895's were dis continued.
 

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Eric,
Back in the days before the flood when you could buy long guns through the mail (1965, if I remember correctly), I bought an 1895 through the old Shotgun News from a man in Selma, Alabama. It was a takedown 38-56 with a 32" barrel! I paid the magnificent sum of $65.00 for it! Forty-odd years ago no one was interested in old Marlins, and I was working on becoming a leading collector of them. A growing family and GCA 68 put paid to my ambitions.
This particular rifle had pretty well turned all patina, but it was completely original, fairly unmarked, and unmessed with. Never did get a chance to shoot it as 38-56 ammunition had disappeared even then. Somewhere I've got a picture of me with the rifle. If I find it, I'll put it up. Wish I still had it (for obvious reasons). It would be interesting to know if there were any others like it. And yeah, Jorgy, it was heavy!
 

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Wouldn't it have been great to have the means and the foresight to have bought every 1895 we saw when we were younger Mike? And of course keep them to realise the increased values too! :)
My first 1895 was also a .38-56 TD Mike! Paid a bit more than you did; $400 with 4 boxes of ammo. Unforutnately I sold it a number of years later for $1600, but that's better than my 401K did!
 

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marlinman93 said:
Wouldn't it have been great to have the means and the foresight to have bought every 1895 we saw when we were younger Mike? And of course keep them to realise the increased values too! :)
My first 1895 was also a .38-56 TD Mike! Paid a bit more than you did; $400 with 4 boxes of ammo. Unforutnately I sold it a number of years later for $1600, but that's better than my 401K did!
Amen, Vall! The guns surely did better than my tanked PD pension plan...

(This may be a stretch, Vall, but I think the serial number of my 38-56 was in that notebook I sent you a while back. If you still have the notes - and it's not too much trouble - I'd like to get the serial number off that gun.)
 
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