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The .32-40 seems to be the rarest of the model 1893's. The .30-30 and .32 HPS are the most common, the .38-55 and .25-36 seem to be about equal, and then the .32-40.
I have one round barrel marked "For Black Powder" and one lightweight, takedown, half octagon, currently. Sold two to another member of this forum, so they're in good hands. If I come across another, I'll drop you a line.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You're telling me what I suspected :( My desire goes 32-40 ,25-36 ,38-55 and the other two if I ever get the first three :!:
 

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I always thought the 25/36 was dropped out of commercial ammo
lines before the 32/40 was. I disagree with Marlinman 93 I believe the
25/36 is scarer of the two. There is no question however which cartidge is
more accurate the 32/40 wins that hands down.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You should give the 38-55 a chance, I believe it will hang with the 32-40. Just look at the old Schuetzen rifles :!: But don't get me wrong at the moment I would rather have a 32-40, if I can only have one :?
 

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I realise the .25-36 was made for less years than the .32-40. I base my "guess" strictly on numbers of 1893's I have seen for sale. I see more .25-36's for sale than .32-40's. I surely am not in on every gun that's sold, nor privy to any info that would tell me exact numbers, but from what I have seen, I guessed that for the years made, the .25-36 must have been a good seller.
When the .32 HPS and .30-30 came on the market, the sales of .32-40 1893's must have nearly dropped to nothing, as both these cartridges do the same thing better! On the other hand, the .25-36 fills a niche that wasn't competing with any other cartridge in the same model.
If the records existed, I'd bet you would see the numbers of .32-40 model 1893's went way down with the introduction of smokeless cartridges in .30-30 and .32 HPS. Just my opinion.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If memory serves, when they changed the designation to 93 the only calibers they were chambering were the 30-30 and the 32 HPS :!:
 

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32-40 and TD's

Gents,
FWIW, I attended an auction here in SE PA coupla' weeks ago, a deluxe 1893TD in 32-40 in excellent condition with 22" half octagon full magazine went for $1400.
Outa' my league unfortunately. A buddy bought a nice 30-30 TD 26" octagon for ~$1200, too much in my view, but he can afford it.
Had a chat to Wild West Guns, I picked up some parts off Ebay from them,
I might be able to generate some interest when things slow down, in them matching the TD pieces on the Marlin system.
I have a 25-36M barrel on my TD, but sadly the bore is terrible.
Val,
How do you feel about relining said barrel, or is it better to leave the original untouched and build a new one?
Cheers,
R*2
 

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32-40 26" octagon

6PT I have an 1893 DOM 1904 that I bought recently. It is missing fore arm, nosecap and tennon. It has a strong bore but dark, with some rod wear at the muzzle. I recently lost a nice 25-36 to a split barrel and have decided to have a couple of modern 44.5 Stevens built for me and my Dad. I like to shoot mine too much and am going to get something made of modern steel. I have a group of 6 Marlins I am considering letting go of plus a Lyman #2A tang, loading tools and some spare parts. Moodyholler
 

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R*2,
Randall Redman in Omak, Washington relined a 25-36 for me. When I got the rifle, the riflings were completely non-existant. If I were building a project gun, whether to be shot or admired, I would think that a nice bore would be paramount. My 25-36 was rough. It looked like it had been used to prop open a barn door. I spent days steaming dents out of the wood before applying a satin tung oil finish. The metal was pitted all over, so I had it glass beaded and blued. Headspace was corrected by setting the barrel back. I installed a Marble's buckhorn sight with a Sheard front. My handloads were duplicating factory loads, but the cannelure on the 117 grain bullet was too low for the Marlin. It was a decent looking gun, although quite non-original, but it was basically a parts gun when I bought it.
 

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Rrussell,
I'm a shooter/collector, so I don't own anything I wont shoot.
In my opinion, a relined barrel is much more acceptable over a bad bore! I wouldn't hesitate to have an old Marlin relined, although I'd want it done right, and in the original caliber. There are a couple of people who can reline your gun, and when it's done it will be tough to tell it was relined, and it will shoot like new!
Drop me a email if you want their contact info.
 

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Moodyholler,
Are you having CPA build your 44 1/2's? Shuttleworth sure makes some gorgeous copies of the 44 1/2, and I especially like his prices and options. What caliber and model are you thinking of getting?
 

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It just goes to show the differences in various parts of the country. I have ever only seen one 25-36 & I bought it. I have seen a number of 32-40s & 30-30s, but no 32s or 38-55s.

If someone ever gets a 'cyber gunshow' going here, I'll post a pic of my special order 1893 takedown in 32-40 w/ a 28" bbl. Shoots well, it does! :D SW
 

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Relining contacts

marlinman93 said:
Rrussell,
I'm a shooter/collector, so I don't own anything I wont shoot.
In my opinion, a relined barrel is much more acceptable over a bad bore! I wouldn't hesitate to have an old Marlin relined, although I'd want it done right, and in the original caliber. There are a couple of people who can reline your gun, and when it's done it will be tough to tell it was relined, and it will shoot like new!
Drop me a email if you want their contact info.
PM sent.
R*2
 

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MM93

MM93, just came from gunsmith with 93 in 25-36. Barel is scratched inside, but not split as my Father said. Good enough scare though. Will stick to light loads and cast bullets in it and the others. I have been shooting my late 93 in 30-30 with factory loads. On the CPA"s my Dad has a bad shoulder and cannot shoot anything that recoils heavily. I am going to have him a 44.5 built in 25-20 SS. He is currently shooting my 44 Stevens in that caliber. I have two 44 Stevens and a #2 Remington in that caliber and I like it. My CPA will be a switch barrel set in 40-70 and 30-40 Krag. Moodyholler
 

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I loaded my own for my 1893s. I used hardcast bullets in my 32-40, 30-30s, and 32 HPS. I used Unique and kept velocities down for recreational shooting. I never got around to using any of them for hunting, although my re-lined 25-36 would have been a dream for whitetail. I used jacketed 60 grain and 117 grain bullets with outstanding results.
 

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The .25-20SS is a great choice for low recoil, but pretty spendy to reload for, as you already know!. Whose brass do you use for your .25-20SS presently? I've tried Bertram, with poor results! Their small caliber brass is junk, and I've lost half of the brass I bought from them at the first firing!
If I might make a suggestion, the .25-20 Win. is a better choice, with cheap brass, cheap dies, and velocities that equal the .25-20SS! In a 44 1/2, the .25-20 can do all the SS does, without the cost, or the extra powder.
My original Stevens 44 1/2 is chambered for the .25-21 Stevens, and it too is a great cartridge, but like the SS, it's expensive to reload, and marginally more velocity. My other 44 1/2 is a .32-40, and with my light loads, the recoil is not much more than the .25-20SS.
Whatever you choose, the .25 cals are all great choices for low recoil, especially in a heavy gun like the 44 1/2!
 

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Sorry to hijack thread!

I have Bertram and Cody Brass. The cody brass is turned like Everlasting and is holding up well. Thanks, moddyholler
 

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Roundsworth said:
I loaded my own for my 1893s. I used hardcast bullets in my 32-40, 30-30s, and 32 HPS. I used Unique and kept velocities down for recreational shooting. I never got around to using any of them for hunting, although my re-lined 25-36 would have been a dream for whitetail. I used jacketed 60 grain and 117 grain bullets with outstanding results.
Roundsworth,
Can you recommend someone to do another 25-36M relining? Or at least where to get a liner with the proper 1:9 twist? My 26"TD barrel has a terrible bore.
Cheers,
R*2
 

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R*2,
Randall Redman, in Omak, Washington, did mine. I have a brochure here that is 3 years old. Back then he charged $150. He was able to do the 25-36, even though he did not have a chambering reamer for it. My chamber was okay and he was able to set the barrel back a bit to correct headspace. Redman and Beinke & Beinke are the 2 names I see all the time for barrel linings. The 1:9 twist may be a problem, though. My 25-36 was a resurrected parts gun made into a shooter, so I was not overly concerned with an authentic twist. Redman's liner was 1:8, which stabilized the long 117 grain bullets as well as the 60 grainers. Redman can be reached at (509)826-5512. He may have added more offerings since 2001. Good luck!
 
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