tortured at Naval Hospital
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  1. #1
    Wrangler
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    tortured at Naval Hospital

    In the late 70s I ended up in the Balboa Naval Hospital after suffering a burst appendix. Getting there was an adventure onto it's self. During recovery I was placed in a large open bay with beds spaced about every ten feet. I was the only patient on active duty in this ward, the rest of the patients about twenty or so, were veterans, all older than myself. I was known as the kid. All of us were recovering from surgery involving our midsections or groins. Several times each day the nurses would have us hold our pillows and cough several times for reasons that now escape me. The pain of coughing is quite vivid though. The real torture was a self inflicted variety, laughter. We started telling jokes. Eventually. just saying, "Did you hear the one about..." would bring about uncontrolled laughter mixed with moans of pure pain. None of us died, but it was touch and go a few times.
    jog, Dansken, punch and 23 others like this.

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    Remember any of the jokes?

    Any of them clean enough to tell here?
    NRA Endowment Life Member, SASS, OGCA, NC Watermen United
    “If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.” -- George Orwell
    "Corruptissima in republica plurimae leges."--Tacitus
    The more numerous the laws, the more corrupt the government.

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    Sidewinder
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    My primary surgeon in the V.A. hospital for a burst appendix was unable to speak understandable English. A matter of concern, but at that point I was just happy someone finally believed I had a problem. No one else did.
    10 days with tubes sucking brown stuff out of my abdomen, I have no doubt that he saved my life and I'm eternally grateful to that Philippine gentleman.
    TEAM 45-70 #1920 , TEAM 1894 #581 , TEAM 39 #500 , TEAM HENRY #152

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    Quote Originally Posted by HIKayaker View Post
    Remember any of the jokes?

    Any of them clean enough to tell here?
    I can't recall any now. I'm thinking they were not that memorable to begin with.

  6. #5
    Gun Wizard
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    Quote Originally Posted by olmarlin View Post
    My primary surgeon in the V.A. hospital for a burst appendix was unable to speak understandable English. A matter of concern, but at that point I was just happy someone finally believed I had a problem. No one else did.
    10 days with tubes sucking brown stuff out of my abdomen, I have no doubt that he saved my life and I'm eternally grateful to that Philippine gentleman.
    Sounds like my experience with the same medical condition in 2016--except my doctor spoke English. I ended up at the V.A. Hospital after the local "hospital" tried to tell me that it was "acid reflux" and sent me home from the E.R. By the time I got into the V.A., my white blood count was over 25,000. No doubt in my mind that the good doctors and nurses at the Spokane V.A. saved my life. I have always got excellent care there.

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    A fellow accompanies his friend to his friend's favorite bar. As they were sitting and enjoying a couple cold brews, one of the other patrons shouted "57!" The entire room erupted with laughter.

    A few minutes passed and another patron called out "24!" Once again the room exploded with laughter.

    The fellow turned to his buddy and said "what's going on with all the shouting and laughing?"
    The friend said "Oh, all of us have been coming here for many years and we've heard all of the jokes. So, we decided, rather than tell the entire joke, we would assign each joke a number."

    Shortly thereafter, a patron shouted "39!" There was dead silence.

    The fellow looked at his buddy and said "how come nobody laughed?"







    The friend smiled and said, "you know how it is, some people can tell jokes and some can't. "


    T.S.
    Last edited by Texas Shooter; 12-22-2019 at 09:09 AM.
    NRA Endowment Member, Texas State Rifle Association Life Member, Firearms Accumulator, Native Texan, Team 99 #29

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    Sidewinder
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    My room-mate as I recovered at Tripler Army Hosp was a Navy SEAL. He had caught a mortar fragment in the eye and was in for removal of the fragment. As it turned out, the impact - following removal - restored his vision to 20-20. He was happy!!! Unfortunately, I as an 18-year-old was mostly engrossed in my own pain. Nonetheless, his happiness was emboldening for me: something along the lines of "were I in his shoes"... Un-seen, that fabulous SEAL gave me courage and energy to overcome my whimpy sorrow. I'll never know his name, but sir:

    Thank you for your service and most importantly, thank you for helping me through the worst pain in my life! It was nothing compared to what you went through!

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    Marlin Marksman
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    Is this a joke thread or a military apendicites thread?
    My son was in the Air Force Security Forces and was sent to Afghanistan in 2004. His first night on duty he was sent out to man a guard post on the perimeter. He began to feel terrible and called in complainig of a wicked stomache ache. The person on the other end of the phone decided that, being a new guy, was suffering from heat and/or dehydration and told him to drink more water and suck it up. My son called back a couple of hours later saying he felt much worse. They had no one to replace him with and told him to suck it up again. Eventually the NCOIC came around inspecting the guards and found my son curled up on the floor with a fever. Now they sent him to the Air Force infirmary where he was diagnosed with appendicites. The Air Force couldn't deal with it there, they had to send him to the Army hospital where he was preped him emergency surgery - then there was a rocket attack so everybody went to the bunkers. By the time they took my son's appendix out it was close to bursting. There is more to this story, but it is a military apendicites thread so I will leave it here.
    Experience is the key to making good decisions.
    The best experience comes from making bad decisions.

    Hubris is seldom rewarded.

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    Sidewinder
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    Ct, did your son make it out okay? We hope so!

    Not a military appendix thread. Had a female guard unwittingly give birth while on guard back in '82 in Frankfurt. She "didn't realize" she was pregnant... She and her child were safely evac'ed to the states. Wanted her to name it "Gibbs" in honor of our base...Hopefully, she didn't give it a "Gibbs Slap"...

    With every deployment, common medical challenges happen. The med guys are more focused of life-saving trauma, but can deal with typical problems - given the opportunity. It seems the med guys treated your son as best as they could, and we are all thankful for that.

    Hang tough!

  11. #10
    Marlin Marksman
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    RFJ22553: He did just fine. It was a matter of first best guess and more new guys had problems with dehydration and heat stress than apendicites. And, from my experience, rocket attacks never come at opportune moments.

    After recovery he was put on light duty in the office but in a couple of weeks they were tired of him so he was sent out to wander around the perimeter and find weakspots. He found so many weak spots that they gave him some Afghans and sent him out to fix the perimeter. Very quickly thereafter his detail consisted of 4 other airmen and he was in charge of reinforcing the perimeter. During slow times he provided security for Intel Ops looking for weapons caches outside the wire. So in the end - apendicites proveded him with his job keeping the Air Force section of Bagram safe.
    Experience is the key to making good decisions.
    The best experience comes from making bad decisions.

    Hubris is seldom rewarded.


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