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Thread: Osage Bow Project



  1. #31
    Gun Wizard
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    Looks like you're gettin' there.

    Awfully thin growth rings on that one. I bet you were pulling your hair out trying to follow that one all the way down the back.

    My very first one had rings about like that. It worked but that particular piece took a fair bit of set. Didn't start with any back set though and my tillering was probably as much or more at fault than any deficiency in the wood.

    FYI, if you feel the need to round off the back of the bow at the handle area for comfort, there really isn't any way to do it other than build it up with something and round THAT off. Super glue and leather works great. It's sort of my one "claim to fame" in the bow building world. As far as I know, I was the first person to do this. Others were building up handles with leather but I think I might have been the first one to use the super glue saturated leather technique. Dean Torges saw it at MOJAM and said he was going to start doing it so that was a real compliment. Don't know if he ever did though. I kinda got out of the trad stuff along about then. I still shoot and hunt with my longbows but I've gotten hooked on the Marlins lately. Here is a link to a build along I did years ago on tradgang. The first pictures are showing the very first bow I ever built but the build along was done on a kids bow made a couple years later. The principles are the same regardless of the size of the bow though.

    Trad Gang.com: Build along, super glue and leather bow handle
    whitewater likes this.
    Thoughts on Remlins: The day I walk into a sporting goods and honestly mistake a Remlin gun for a JM gun, THAT will be the day I think about buying one. Until then, they can keep 'em.

    Words to live by: Just because something is primitive, doesn't mean it has to be crude. Just because something is custom, doesn't mean it's quality.

  2. #32
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    You are absolutely correct. It took me hours to get the whole length to one layer. Used my Buck Vantage Pro pocket knife to do it. Probably about 6 hours into just that portion of it. As you can see one limb has a decent back set to it but the other is straight. I am considering steaming the straight limb to impart a similar back set as the other limb. Picked up a package of sinew and am probably going to back the bow with sinew fibers as insurance for cracks. The thin layers have me a bit concerned. Thanks for the link.

  3. #33
    Gun Wizard
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    Really looking good there. Going to be a nice one.
    whitewater likes this.
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  5. #34
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    I think the idea of putting a similar back set into the other limb is probably a good one and will simplify the tiller process. If you don't, it's a toss up which end to use as the bottom limb. Normally the bottom limb is about an inch shorter so it's stiffer by a smidge. I think I'd use the straighter limb on the bottom and the backset one for the top if you DON'T induce backset into the straight limb. Someone else might come up with a good argument for the other direction though. As for the sinew, it certainly can't hurt. If you did a good job of following the growth ring, it probably is not needed but does go a long way towards preserving the unstrung profile of the bow. i.e. saving the back set.

    Are you planning to narrow it in the fades at all or leave it wide? Since it's not a "bendy handle" bow, you should be able to narrow it significantly which will help the shape of the grip and bring things closer to center shot. Not really needed but just makes it a bit easier to match your arrows.

    Looks like you followed the grain nicely when laying out the limb tapers. That's something a lot of guys don't do and end up splitting a limb due to grain run in/out issues. Run out is not an issue, it's when it comes back into the limb on the way to the tip that you get problems. Your stave looks fairly straight end to end. If you stretch a string over the center of the tips, does it fall fairly close to the center of the handle? That's really important. If it's off center, fudge your tips as far as you can to bring the string through the center of the handle. Otherwise, when you draw it back, the bow will twist in your hand or the limbs will twist so the string DOES fall in the center. It's just natural. Then it jumps and twists on release.
    Last edited by Dave Bulla; 11-23-2014 at 12:50 AM.
    whitewater and crow killer like this.
    Thoughts on Remlins: The day I walk into a sporting goods and honestly mistake a Remlin gun for a JM gun, THAT will be the day I think about buying one. Until then, they can keep 'em.

    Words to live by: Just because something is primitive, doesn't mean it has to be crude. Just because something is custom, doesn't mean it's quality.

  6. #35
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    When I was a kid my Grandpaw told me about a friend of his that made a bow out of Osage he got from GP out of the post stack he had. Aaron was a millwright at Winchester, used FMJ for 06's on the arrows. It shot the arrow all the way through a 1 1/2" Cypress gate. That man could do the most fine woodwork I ever saw.
    whitewater likes this.
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  7. #36
    Gun Wizard
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    So, how's progress been on this one? Ever get 'er done?
    Thoughts on Remlins: The day I walk into a sporting goods and honestly mistake a Remlin gun for a JM gun, THAT will be the day I think about buying one. Until then, they can keep 'em.

    Words to live by: Just because something is primitive, doesn't mean it has to be crude. Just because something is custom, doesn't mean it's quality.

  8. #37
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    Not completed. I put it on the back burner but it is not forgotten. I'm still shaving down the limbs. It takes quite a bit of time to work this wood. It is one of the hardest woods I have ever tried to work. The recent cold weather plus a bad cold had me sidelined for a while... about a month. Some nasty bugs going around here in Florida.
    I'll post some pic's when I make a significant change.

  9. #38
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    Remember - Native Americans made incredibly powerful Osage bows, out in the woods, with a tomahawk, a knife, and bear fat for a finish...
    Last edited by Quick Karl; 02-25-2019 at 08:42 AM.
    “Intellectuals solve problems; geniuses prevent them. - Albert Einstein”

  10. #39
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    Get the Traditional Bowyers Bible. I have all three books and they have all the info you need for making a good bow. Basically, tillering is the most important aspect of building a traditional bow so that it don't blow your elbows and shoulder out with the shock. Mossback has built them and his advice is about as good as it gets.

    DEP


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