Model 410 Marlin, what is it good for??? LOTS - Page 3
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30
Like Tree33Likes

Thread: Model 410 Marlin, what is it good for??? LOTS



  1. #21
    Marlin Marksman
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    North Central, PA
    Posts
    1,387
    Member #
    43137
    Thanked
    1850 times
    The .410 shotguns are seeing a rebirth in the northeast for turkey hunting... YES, turkey hunting.

    With the newer tungsten shot that is available, you can fire #9 tungsten shot, between tungsten being 50% heavier than lead and much harder (better penetration)... That #9 tungsten it has as much or more of a wallop then using #6 lead shot.... They claim the #8 tungsten is close to the performance of #5 or even #4 lead shot.... and the #7 tungsten is along the performance of #2 lead shot.

    Being able to load up a .410 case with size #9 tungsten, and having as good or better performance over #6 lead... gives you some serious abilities with that small shotgun round.... A novelty or not, many Spring Gobbler hunters are making the move. Putting down their 12 gauges and going the way of the .410


    One small point to make... I thought, that if the tungsten loads can make a .410 into a solid turkey gun... How much more effective can tungsten loads make my 12ga... Then when I checked them out, at $40 a box for 5ea 12ga rounds.... YES, $8 every time you pull that trigger.... I then decided that my $1.50 per round lead loads, were good enough for me.
    Mike 2010 and northmn like this.

    Can never have too many;
    1895xlr, 1894cs, 1894css, 1894ltdss, 338mxlr, 336ss, 336gbl, 336cs, 39a, 36a
    And still looking for more...

  2. #22
    Tinhorn
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    61
    Member #
    151947
    Thanked
    52 times
    I haven't even seen Tungsten shot in Qld, Australia... I'd love to try it out, however, I cringe at the thought of how much it would cost!!!
    The density of the shot sounds like good news.

    Like others I suspect I will be sticking with lead shot, and hard cast projectiles I can manufacture myself, after all, given how little shot the .410 uses with each reload it will take me a while to work my way through what I have now!

  3. #23
    Tinhorn
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    61
    Member #
    151947
    Thanked
    52 times
    If you were thinking of a Marlin .410 lever action for Turkey hunting I would look at the later 1985 .410 lever action, with the screw in chokes! The earlier 336 (modern Model 410) based version was a fixed cylinder version (excellent for solids).

  4. Remove Advertisements
    MarlinOwners.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #24
    Tinhorn
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    61
    Member #
    151947
    Thanked
    52 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Shark Bait View Post
    All I know is that I want one. What I'll use it for I have no idea. Doesn't matter though.
    Think of the .410 as the .22lr of shotguns. Like the .22lr it has limited range, like the .22lr (if you reload) it is the cheapest shotgun shooting (if you are going to shoot it a lot you need to be rich, or reload!). There are a plethora of different rounds currently available.
    The lever action is a heavy frame, so there is virtually no recoil (I'd say no recoil). The sight system on the Model 410 matches the range restrictions - big, bright, front sight; this makes it excellent for younger, much older, or recoil shy persons. As you get older the .410 can keep you shotgunning, hunting, because of its characteristics. Good 'truck gun' for opportunity hunting.
    The lever action probably isn't the number one choice for a 'bug out' or 'get home' gun... I chose a lighter, Boito, 20 inch barrel, .410, double barrel double trigger, with rifle sights and sling, plus .22lr insert (making it even shorter range!) for that. It breaks down to fit in a pack, rounds are light, limited range but effective; I seriously doubt I will be fighting hordes of zombies, or people (I'm not American! Sorry), but it is a useful package for getting back from some of the places I travel - I'm in Australia, everything wants to kill you (As someone commented about a little Australian bright coloured spider sitting on her hand... it's cute, but it wants to kill you, like all Australian wildlife; its just that its teeth are too short!!!).

  6. #25
    Gun Wizard
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,768
    Member #
    52778
    Thanked
    5980 times
    As an aside, shoot 2.5 inch 410 out of the micro groove 444. Unlike the dedicated 410, it throws a pattern with a donut hole in the middle. With 7.5 shot useful out to about 10 yards, for grouse/rabbits that get to close. You kinda aim off about 6 inches, since the edge of the pattern is denser than the center.
    "Should have put more dirt down, saw it right off." Bear Claw in Jeremiah Johnson



  7. #26
    Tinhorn
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    61
    Member #
    151947
    Thanked
    52 times
    I AM getting tired of the kids borrowing my Marlin Model 410... it's raining, a couple of small pigs wandered around the dam, a stones throw from the house. I saw them, and the boys were like "Lets go get them"... so one gets my Model 410... one grabs my short barrel 12g O/U... and I end up with my new little Boito .410 coach gun (satin finish, just picked up, never shot it! Haven't set it up the way I like).
    Results> Model 410 two, 12G one... me >> None >>> but now know what I want to do is the right idea for that shotgun! Shot high... I am modifying it with luminous rifle sights clamped to the rib, will make the right barrel .41 cylinder for solids (.37 hard cast in a cup, or the .408 hard cast), left barrel .4 for .375 hard cast balls [reamed and polished bores], and will lengthen length of pull with a recoil pad. Making a shorter version of my 28 inch Boito .410, but with rifle sights).
    As usual, at short range, the 2 1/2 Winchester .410 solids in the Marlin went right through the small pigs, and dropped them on the spot.
    I think the little Boito will be a perfect small carry, get home, opportunity hunting, gun, when set up. The only thing not going for the Marlin, in this set up, is weight, and an inability to be broken down into its parts.
    Last edited by BabyMarlin38-40; 05-23-2020 at 06:39 PM.

  8. #27
    Tinhorn
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    61
    Member #
    151947
    Thanked
    52 times
    Quote Originally Posted by BabyMarlin38-40 View Post
    I AM getting tired of the kids borrowing my Marlin Model 410... it's raining, a couple of small pigs wandered around the dam, a stones throw from the house. I saw them, and the boys were like "Lets go get them"... so one gets my Model 410... one grabs my short barrel 12g O/U... and I end up with my new little Boito .410 coach gun (satin finish, just picked up, never shot it! Haven't set it up the way I like).
    Results> Model 410 two, 12G one... me >> None >>> but now know what I want to do is the right idea for that shotgun! Shot high... I am modifying it with luminous rifle sights clamped to the rib, will make the right barrel .42 for solids (.37 hard cast in a cup), left barrel .4 for .375 hard cast balls [reamed and polished bores], and will lengthen length of pull with a recoil pad. Making a shorter version of my 28 inch Boito .410, but with rifle sights).
    As usual, at short range, the 2 1/2 Winchester .410 solids in the Marlin went right through the small pigs, and dropped them on the spot.
    I think the little Boito will be a perfect small carry, get home, opportunity hunting, gun, when set up. The only thing not going for the Marlin, in this set up, is weight, and an inability to be broken down into its parts.
    PS My wife has declared, when the little Boito is set up, it will be 'her' shotgun!! I can't win!

  9. #28
    Certified Gunnut
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Walker MN
    Posts
    4,008
    Member #
    37112
    Thanked
    9828 times
    I used to be more involved in shotguns than I am now. Many claim that the 410 3" is little more effective than the 2.5 as it does not pattern so well. Two guys in shot gunning offered reasons for that. Brister and Roster. Too long of a shot column smashes the shot at the bottom of the shell and the shot flies off to who knows where. I use a 28 gauge instead of a 410 but we see some 410 use here. The Tungsten Super Shot was getting popular a few years back and can be loaded in other gauges besides 12, like the 20 gauge. A 410 is called full choke at 25 yards as compared to the others at 40. If you look at the barrel restriction it is close to that of a improved cylinder in a 12 bore and the 12 bore will pattern about 70% at 25 yards with an IC choke. Tungsten shot does not deform and patterns very very tight. That's the technical stuff.

    410's with factory foster slugs were often given to kids to hunt deer in MN in earlier times. While some criticized them, they took a lot of deer. Lots of grouse have been pot shot with them as they are handy to carry in a car. There have been some issues with the ones in pistols. The rather interesting Judge revolver is an example. When I asked a knowledgeable clerk at the LGS about it, he claimed that a lot of guys were disappointed when they found that they were not very effective on grouse. Same was said about the Thompson Center Contenders. They very often got feathers but no grouse. They went on to make the judge into a revolving shoulder arm, but many were not too happy with them. My brother in law had an old Savage single shot that he loved for squirrel shooting and general varmint control around the house. Navajo mentions uses one for his squirrel hunting with his dogs. I had read that they were often used by those that had 45-70's as a bird shot round loaded single shot.

    Some find them handy some don't. In the States you can buy 20 gauge shells cheaper than 410's so more kids are learning shot gunning with 20 gauges nows. At one time they charged by the contents of the shell and 410's were cheaper. As I reload shotgun shells, I have found the 28 gauge to be as cheap as about anything. 410 is popular with many that want a challenge in the shooting games like skeet.

    DEP
    BabyMarlin38-40 likes this.

  10. #29
    Tinhorn
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    61
    Member #
    151947
    Thanked
    52 times
    Quote Originally Posted by northmn View Post
    I used to be more involved in shotguns than I am now. Many claim that the 410 3" is little more effective than the 2.5 as it does not pattern so well. Two guys in shot gunning offered reasons for that. Brister and Roster. Too long of a shot column smashes the shot at the bottom of the shell and the shot flies off to who knows where. I use a 28 gauge instead of a 410 but we see some 410 use here. The Tungsten Super Shot was getting popular a few years back and can be loaded in other gauges besides 12, like the 20 gauge. A 410 is called full choke at 25 yards as compared to the others at 40. If you look at the barrel restriction it is close to that of a improved cylinder in a 12 bore and the 12 bore will pattern about 70% at 25 yards with an IC choke. Tungsten shot does not deform and patterns very very tight. That's the technical stuff.

    410's with factory foster slugs were often given to kids to hunt deer in MN in earlier times. While some criticized them, they took a lot of deer. Lots of grouse have been pot shot with them as they are handy to carry in a car. There have been some issues with the ones in pistols. The rather interesting Judge revolver is an example. When I asked a knowledgeable clerk at the LGS about it, he claimed that a lot of guys were disappointed when they found that they were not very effective on grouse. Same was said about the Thompson Center Contenders. They very often got feathers but no grouse. They went on to make the judge into a revolving shoulder arm, but many were not too happy with them. My brother in law had an old Savage single shot that he loved for squirrel shooting and general varmint control around the house. Navajo mentions uses one for his squirrel hunting with his dogs. I had read that they were often used by those that had 45-70's as a bird shot round loaded single shot.

    Some find them handy some don't. In the States you can buy 20 gauge shells cheaper than 410's so more kids are learning shot gunning with 20 gauges nows. At one time they charged by the contents of the shell and 410's were cheaper. As I reload shotgun shells, I have found the 28 gauge to be as cheap as about anything. 410 is popular with many that want a challenge in the shooting games like skeet.

    DEP
    A .410 shooter DEFINITELY needs to become a reloader... even keeping it simple with a scoop, and hand tools, makes it economical (a MEC600 is easier, for plastic cases); for longevity I like brass cases, which DO require a bit of work to fire form, and are similar to a rifle round to reload. Reloading requires patience, and accuracy, but IS worth it... if you have the components you can reload forever, for stuff all cost. This also makes it a cheap child's learning shotgun, and a very good hunting shotgun for mum or dad, within its limits.
    A single shot shotgun will last several lifetimes (even a cheapie), is a 'safer' option, will slow down consumption of ammunition, and teach about limits, patterning, reloading. A double barrel is similar to the above, and can be set up (especially with double triggers) for different opportunities.

  11. #30
    Tinhorn
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    61
    Member #
    151947
    Thanked
    52 times
    Quote Originally Posted by BabyMarlin38-40 View Post
    In these Marlin lever guns, the Model 410 I have, and by the looks of it the later 1895 410, you can actually load up a 2.5 as if it is a 3 inch (11/16 shot), when you 'cook your own' reloads. I understand the Model 410 shotgun is rated as a 336 for pressure, provided the cases don't show pressure signs, and you use the right powder, you can achieve easy 3 inch loads in the 2 1/2 case, definately if you are using brass cases. That is one of the joys of these shotguns... they are extremely strong actions, for the dimunitive .410 load.
    I'm trying buffering the shot to see if this tightens up the patterns, from what I've seen in a 12G it will.


Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New | Subscribed Threads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •