Remember Slow Food? (Email from a friend)
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  1. #1
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    Remember Slow Food? (Email from a friend)

    Someone asked the other day, "What was your favorite. fast food when you were growing up?"

    "We didn't have fast food when I was growing up," I informed him. "All the food was slow."

    "C'mon, seriously. Where did you eat?"

    "It was a place called 'Home'," I explained!

    "Mom cooked every day and when Dad got home from work, we sat down together at the dining room table and if I didn't like what she put on my plate, I was allowed to sit there until I did like it."

    By this time, the kid was laughing so hard I was afraid he was going to suffer serious internal damage, so I didn't tell him the part about how I had to have permission to leave the table.

    But here are some other things I would have told him about my childhood if I figured his system could have handled it:

    Some parents never owned their own house, never wore Levis, never set foot on a golf course, never traveled out of the country or had a credit card.

    In their later years they had something called a revolving charge card. The card was good only at Sears Roebuck. Or maybe it was Sears & Roebuck. Either way, there is no Roebuck anymore. Maybe he died.

    My parents never drove me to soccer practice. This was mostly because we never had heard of soccer.

    I had a bicycle that weighed probably 50 pounds, and only had one speed, (slow).

    We didn't have a television in our house until I was 11. It was, of course, black and white, and the station went off the air at midnight, after playing the national anthem and a poem about God; it came back on the air at about 6 a.m. And there was usually a locally produced news and farm show on, featuring local people.

    I was 19 before I tasted my first pizza, it was called "pizza pie." When I bit into it, I burned the roof of my mouth and the cheese slid off, swung down, plastered itself against my chin and burned that, too. It's still the best pizza I ever had.

    I never had a telephone in my room. The only phone in the house was in the kitchen and it was on a party line. Before you could dial, you had to listen and make sure some people you didn't know weren't already using the line.

    Pizzas were not delivered to our home. But milk was.

    All newspapers were delivered by boys and all boys delivered newspapers. My brother delivered a newspaper, six days a week. It cost 7 cents a paper, of which he got to keep 2 cents. He had to get up at 6 a.m. every morning.

    On Saturday, he had to collect the 42 cents from his customers. His favorite customers were the ones who gave him 50 cents and told him to keep the change. His least favorite customers were the ones who seemed to never be home on collection day.

    Movie stars kissed with their mouths shut. At least, they did in the movies. There were no movie ratings because all movies were responsibly produced for everyone to enjoy viewing, without profanity or violence or most anything offensive.

    If you grew up in a generation before there was fast food, you may want to share some of these memories with your children or grandchildren. Just don't blame me if they bust a gut laughing.

    Growing up isn't what it used to be, is it?
    JohnD13, kraynky, GITU1 and 29 others like this.
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    That pizza thing is PMS:

    Pizza Mouth Syndrome

    AC
    Reload, FTG-05 and Mike 2010 like this.

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    I had to walk to the bus stop at the end of the road, even if it was snowing or raining. When it rained you wore a black or yellow rubberized coat over your clothes that fastened with toggles. It was designed so that all the water that ran off was directed into your shoes. You also wore galoshes that went over your shoes and also fastened with toggles. Adults had short stretchy covers for their shoes and almost never wore galoshes. ( I can't tell you the actual name for the stretchy shoe covers as it wouldn't get past the moderators...) And I didn't have a back pack for my books, no one did.

    Shoes had to be shined. They were all leather. Sneakers were canvas, the only color was white, and they had no padding. High tops were cool. If you were lucky you had a pair of each, leather shoes and sneakers. You couldn't wear your sneakers to school, but you had to take them for gym class. Couldn't wear blue jeans either...

    Caps had a thing that rolled up and snapped over the brim. In cold weather it could be unsnapped and folded down to cover your ears, and then snapped again under your chin.

    Remember Flutophones in music class? And air raid drills where you crouched under your desk?
    Reload, Mop, marlinluvr and 6 others like this.
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    Remember girls wore skirts.

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    Mop
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    I resemble most of that.

    Mama would tell me to "go out and get the milk" which was on a shelf specifically built for that purpose so the milkman wouldn't set it on the ground.

    We had a floor furnace for heat and the telephone hung on the kitchen wall.

    I recall trying to get Dad to stop at the Burger Chef on Sundays after church, which he never did cause Mama had something to cook when we got home.

    I was in high school before I had pizza.

    The first charge card I had was the Sears & Roebuck so I could purchase a washer and dryer. They wouldn't let me charge but one at a time because both would have been over my limit.

    I saw a video of some kids trying to work a rotary dial phone. I didn't know it was that hard.
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    I'd put my Winchester in a soft guncase, and walk to the train station or bus stop, depending on where practice was. I got on the bus or train, and there were very few looks. Just another kid with a .22 going to shooting practice. Winchester/Western Super Speed or Super-X target loads(yellow box) were 25 cents through the Civil Air Patrol, or 50 cents in stores when we bought our own. I got a job working after school in Junior High to feed my gun and cheesesteak habit.

    Now they'd call out the SWAT Team for me, and an ambulance to treat the heart-attack sufferers.
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    I remember when you had to lick stamps to put them on the envelope. And you had to lick the envelope too.

    And trading stamps, Green Stamps, Yellow Stamps, and Plaid Stamps--licking them by the sheets and sticking them into the books so they could be redeemed for merchandise.

    I also remember walking out my back door to go hunting. And I lived in a development, not on a farm. But there were undeveloped areas nearby. I would jump 10-15 rabbits in an hour. Really miss that one...
    Mop, marlinluvr, rob42049 and 4 others like this.
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    I ,remember, 3 speed on the column, hand signals, and all dirt roads. After a rain we had to be sure and straddle the pools of water in the road; if you ran through one, you were most likely to have water splash up thru the floorboard and wet you leg. I grew up in a small town in South Alabama. When I turned 16 I went to take my driving test and get my licenses. The Highway patrol officer conducting the tests, looked at our vehicle and said, "No way." But, he new I needed the licenses, so he gave me the keys to his patrol car. I toke my driving test in Highway patrol car. When did America start to change? I guess I'm having flash backs. In regards to your statement about movie stars, remember the Dick Van Dyke show? Any time,here way a scene of their bedroom; the scene always showed 2 beds.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by montezumaz View Post
    Someone asked the other day, "What was your favorite. fast food when you were growing up?"

    "We didn't have fast food when I was growing up," I informed him. "All the food was slow."

    "C'mon, seriously. Where did you eat?"

    "It was a place called 'Home'," I explained!

    "Mom cooked every day and when Dad got home from work, we sat down together at the dining room table and if I didn't like what she put on my plate, I was allowed to sit there until I did like it."

    By this time, the kid was laughing so hard I was afraid he was going to suffer serious internal damage, so I didn't tell him the part about how I had to have permission to leave the table.

    But here are some other things I would have told him about my childhood if I figured his system could have handled it:

    Some parents never owned their own house, never wore Levis, never set foot on a golf course, never traveled out of the country or had a credit card.

    In their later years they had something called a revolving charge card. The card was good only at Sears Roebuck. Or maybe it was Sears & Roebuck. Either way, there is no Roebuck anymore. Maybe he died.

    My parents never drove me to soccer practice. This was mostly because we never had heard of soccer.

    I had a bicycle that weighed probably 50 pounds, and only had one speed, (slow).

    We didn't have a television in our house until I was 11. It was, of course, black and white, and the station went off the air at midnight, after playing the national anthem and a poem about God; it came back on the air at about 6 a.m. And there was usually a locally produced news and farm show on, featuring local people.

    I was 19 before I tasted my first pizza, it was called "pizza pie." When I bit into it, I burned the roof of my mouth and the cheese slid off, swung down, plastered itself against my chin and burned that, too. It's still the best pizza I ever had.

    I never had a telephone in my room. The only phone in the house was in the kitchen and it was on a party line. Before you could dial, you had to listen and make sure some people you didn't know weren't already using the line.

    Pizzas were not delivered to our home. But milk was.

    All newspapers were delivered by boys and all boys delivered newspapers. My brother delivered a newspaper, six days a week. It cost 7 cents a paper, of which he got to keep 2 cents. He had to get up at 6 a.m. every morning.

    On Saturday, he had to collect the 42 cents from his customers. His favorite customers were the ones who gave him 50 cents and told him to keep the change. His least favorite customers were the ones who seemed to never be home on collection day.

    Movie stars kissed with their mouths shut. At least, they did in the movies. There were no movie ratings because all movies were responsibly produced for everyone to enjoy viewing, without profanity or violence or most anything offensive.

    If you grew up in a generation before there was fast food, you may want to share some of these memories with your children or grandchildren. Just don't blame me if they bust a gut laughing.

    Growing up isn't what it used to be, is it?
    Just outstandin
    gunscrewguy likes this.

  11. #10
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    We had no electricity till I was 5 years old. No plumbing. no running water. we milked a cow for milk. Walked 1 1/4 mile to catch a school bus.

    The bus was an ole ford that had a bench on each side running front to back. Made out of steel, no padding. Some times we never went to town

    for as much as 3 months. Did have a battery radio and a oak wood "ice box". Ice man brought ice through the country once a week. Cool aid was a treat

    as well as chips off the ice truck when he cut your ice. We got electricity in 1947 and telephones in 1968. [party line] Only wore shoes to school when you got to high school..
    It Ain't Over till It,s Over !


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