Does Reloading Save You Money? - Page 7
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  1. #61
    Tenderfoot
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    If you are only buying a few boxes, it is cheaper to just buy factory ammo. You have to really do a lot of shooting to make reloading pay off.
    tranteruk likes this.

  2. #62
    Gun Wizard
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    What interesting replies. The answer seems to be, no and yes, depending on things like how often do we shoot and whether we are shooting the rarer calibre's.

    I think for me, especially nowdays it's not worth the effort. Gone are the days when I would reload a couple of hundred .357s and 9mm's the day before a range visit. I have the same press I had forty years ago, and various dies, but ammo is not expensive, everything I use can be mil spec ball. Except for my 1894c, but I try not to put silly amounts through, for fear of waring it out. Its a 1990s JM and I like it a lot.

    So no, maybe not worth it, for me anyway.
    Last edited by tranteruk; 10-03-2019 at 06:31 AM. Reason: Bored
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  3. #63
    Sidewinder
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    Its easy to say now that I am up and running and have spent the $ - but is it a cost or an investment. I bought most of my stuff second hand - lyman press and case sizing equipment, rcbs scales, redding powder thrower and even half of my dies were 2nd hand - much of mine is 1980's vintage. Previous owners had looked after it and so have I - think the type of person who has the patience to reload probably looks after their precision equipment which is really what it is.

    If I decided tomorrow I don't want to reload any more I think I would be able to sell all my reloading gear to local Marlin Owners members for the same price I bought it for (don't get your hopes up guys - it isn't for sale). The trouble with buying 2nd hand reloading gear is finding someone that is selling, at least that's the case where I live.... If you live in a country with 300 million people its probably easier to get started.
    Last edited by Australian; 10-03-2019 at 05:39 PM.
    Gareth Holland likes this.
    Marlin 444 - Marlin 336 30-30 - Marlin 1894M - Marlin 1894 44 Magnum - Winchester 1892 38-40

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  5. #64
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    You do not have to shoot a lot to recoup your investment in a reloading setup if you buy smart. I've been bare-bones reloading for almost 48 years and it's like any other passion, the work you put in is rewarded many times over. If you've got $225 in your set; press, scale, dippers, trimmers, loading block, and a good caliper, you can cover the initial cost in 300 rounds of centerfire(15 boxes) by saving $15 per box of cartridges. Every $45 die set pays for itself in 3 or 4 boxes of reloads. Sure, you can go top-end, but if you're looking for accurate, consistent, concentric ammunition, a basic setup will do you just fine. Be careful and take measurements, minimum tolerances and concentricity do more for accuracy than a $200 widget. Get the bullet started into the throat/bore straight.
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  6. #65
    Tenderfoot
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    Like many of these folks, i don't believe loading ALWAYS saves you money, but it DOES allow you to load much better ammunition than you can buy. My hunting loads always have premium bullets, and also like others, i've gotten factory ammo with cracked necks, widely varied powder charges, etc. And, if you're like me and like wildcats, reloading is pretty much your only option.
    If you cast your own bullets that brings a whole new slant to things. I have about 200 pounds of linotype, which makes fine bullets, and for slower speeds wheel weights can be fine.
    I've been loading since 1975 and enjoy it. But also like the others have said, pay attention when you're loading.

  7. #66
    Wrangler
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    As a sucker for oddball calibers, reloading saves me money by letting me shoot things that are either scarce, costly, or both. As mentioned by others, tailoring a load to your gun can be very important. Sure, I can buy 250 Savage rounds, but only 100 grain loads are available. They don't stabilize in my rifle, but my 87 gr loads shoot great. I enjoy shooting 256 Win Mag. Factory ammo hasn't been produced in decades and is sold as "collectable". Anyone priced 25-20 ammo lately ($1.40 per round)? It can be reloaded for pennies a round. Just looked at 9.3 x 62; $2.50 - $5.00 per round. I'd never shoot mine if I had to buy factory.

    Do I save any money reloading .223, .308, or 30-06? Probably not, but I still enjoy doing it and reloading does let me shoot all the oddball guns I love.
    rob42049, Australian and Boris like this.
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  8. #67
    Tinhorn
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    Hey tranteruk, from reading all the replies it would seem many agree reloading does not necessarily make shooting more economical. I know that economy is the rationalization many of of use when we decide to start reloading. I told myself that very same thing. Of course, reloading is really just another part of our shooting hobbies. I do not think many of us who choose shooting sports do so based on the economy of the hobby.

    In some cases, such as competition shooting where ya expend large volumes of ammo on practice, it can be more economical. Not counting the cost of the accumulated brass, reloading gear, or my time, I could load practice ammo for 50% of the retail cost. I do think the most economical shooting is done by those reloaders who are good scroungers and cast their own bullets.

    I would say the two key points are enjoyment of the hobby and being able to reload with the components of choice. Beyond that, what price do you put on doing something ya enjoy doing?
    Deadace101, rob42049 and tranteruk like this.

  9. #68
    Marlin Marksman
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    I started reloading to save money, then realised what I was into. I reload now for 1 reason only to create the best hand crafted ammo I can, in terms of accuracy and terminal performance. In terms of if bought and hand crafted were the same I would still craft my own. Most of my kit has paid for it's self long ago, but I did buy a Lee 4 die set of dies last week. I wanted a collet neck die and a die alone was half the price of the ultimate 4 die set on the net. I reload because I enjoy making things and it gives me infinite pleasure and confidence to know the very best possible round for the shot I am about to take is already in the chamber. I will be doing more range time in the future so more reloading. Gar.

  10. #69
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    I would have to say the one that saves the most money is the 45-70 from my list of cartridges. I also load 45 acp pretty cheap with cast bullets, the others maybe not so much but is a lot of fun so get a hobby I enjoy. Kind of like when I did a lot of fly fishing, not sure it was cheaper to tye the flies but was a lot more fun than purchasing and much more rewarding when I caught a big rainbow on my own fly.......

    I also get a lot of satisfaction from putting meat in the freezer knowing I made the round that put the animal down.
    rob42049 likes this.
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  11. #70
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    I think most guys that got into loading early, usually ended up just as deep in guns too. Over a life time you gather up a lot of gear. I can't really put a price on mine except I've been operating in the black for many years. I've bought dies foe calibers I didn't own. Usually turned out I did down the road. I don't think I've one set of dies that I didn't own a rifle in at some time in my life. I still load with Rock Chucker because I'm not into quantity. I've not been involved in the games that reqire a thousand rounds per weekend so I just putter along. Pour bullets in winter when it's could and try to get them loaded up before good weather. Empties I process as I accumulate enough to make it worth the time. I keep up with this so I don't have to start from zero all at once.
    Hatch in LA and Australian like this.
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