Does Reloading Save You Money? - Page 12
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Thread: Does Reloading Save You Money?



  1. #111
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    So....the more you shoot.....the more money you have in your accounts?

    Man, I wish it really worked that way.

    Everyone has a budget where we must pay the bills, buy food, and provide for ourselves and our family. Our shooting budget is a small percentage of that. We cannot exceed that budget without cutting into the money we need to pay bills or detract from the money will actually DO save to have money for emergencies and anticipated future bills.

    The more you shoot, the more you exchange a higher volume of lower cost reloaded ammo for a smaller amount of shooting with more expensive factory ammo. That is not saving money as much as it is lowering the per round cost of your shooting budget, which has finite limits.

    The more you shoot, the more you spend on shooting, no matter how you get the ammo.
    Last edited by 35remington; 12-25-2019 at 11:09 AM.
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  2. #112
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    Primarily being a match shooter, shoot about the same mount of rounds weekly. Reloading based on picking up all components on sale, compared to buying factory does save, a considerable amount of money.
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  3. #113
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    Certainly no argument there.

    ”The more you shoot the more you save” statement is more than a little contradictory.

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  5. #114
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    I just can't help it .... I have to share some childhood acquired knowledge ...

    Beans, beans - the wonderful fruit
    The more you eat - the more you can shoot
    The more you shoot - the better you feel
    Let's have beans for every meal

    At least that's the way I remember it now .....

    jd
    Guns - They aren't really yours until you void the warranty!!


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  6. #115
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    Once you tool up, Yes it does save you money per round.

    The truth be told you will probably take up more room, shoot more, reload more, ignore momma more, and have the best time of your life.

    Plug in the 'momma factor you'll probably spend more for HER wants.

    AC
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  7. #116
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    I don't think I've saved a dime reloading as the search for more and more and more stuff is endless. However; my intent was never to save a penny, it was to be able to have ammo when and how I wanted it. Also it opened every door to every caliber that I wanted to load for from the normal to the obscure. Reloading is not about anything other than being exempt from most ammo shortages, being able to shoot more and enjoying a hobby that gives great self satisfaction when it all comes together on the range....or not. Finally if the poo hit the fan I could last for a good while....or become a reloading slave for the local warlord.
    Remember, only your enemy wants you disarmed.

  8. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by 35remington View Post
    Certainly no argument there.

    ”The more you shoot the more you save” statement is more than a little contradictory.
    That is a statement of fact. There is no provision made for people with piss poor priorities. A guys financial standing is his own problem. It is simple math that handloads allow you to shoot more for less than factory ammo.
    gunscrewguy likes this.
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  9. #118
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    At some point we’ve all got a budget. When that point is exceeded, the more you shoot, the less you’ll save. Just saying the volume we shoot limits the savings part of the equation to a finite amount of shooting.

    The point I am making as are you is that reloading lets you shoot more for a given cost. Or you can shoot the same amount for less cost. At the same time we would both acknowledge that shooting more for the same cost isn’t saving any money, but we may be a lot more satisfied with how much we get to shoot!

    A lot of the costs of reloading aren’t tracked very closely. That part is certainly up to the individual. The cost of reloading is usually under calculated.

  10. #119
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    The original question had to do with reloading costs/savings reference military surplus ammunition. Regarding surplus 7.62x51 (30 150 FMJ, most of that is between 50 and 70 cents a round, with widely varying accuracy, a very few fairly good at about 1.75 MOA, most pretty bad at 3 MOA or more. Reloading 150 gr FMJ (none pulled IMI, General Dynamics) you may need to sort the bullets by weigh and/or length, to achieve possibly 1.5 MOA, this at about 37 cents a round, a fairly substantial savings around 40%. .223 or 5.56 is generally a little tighter in the accuracy department if you find the right loads, the cost saving is less, and probably not worth reloading if you can find an accurate factory load. Recently purchased from SG Ammo a large variety of mil surplus 223/5.56 loads and fired for accuracy at 100 yds, some shot well enough to be come a go to load negating a need to reload, some where horrible. 223 provided better accuracy than 5.56 across the board, 55gr FMJ bested 62 gr FMJ green tip. PMC, Hornady, Geco, IMI (best 5.56) did well out of multiple rifles.
    Last edited by graymustang; 12-26-2019 at 08:28 AM.
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  11. #120
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    When accounting for the costs of reloading current pricing of the components is the one to use.

    Frequently I see guys claim that since they bought their primers and bullets in 1981 and since they are using up their old stash the 1981 price is used to figure their per shot cost of the ammo.

    The trouble with that is that 1981 prices for components were about a third of what they are now, and the current value of the primer you are using isn’t one cent but rather closer to three cents. Same for everything else. Allowance must be made for the depreciated value of the current dollar. 1981 dollars are worth more than current dollars. The current replacement cost of the components you are using is the correct way to figure your current costs of reloading for components bought at retail price 38 years ago.

    Unless you happened upon a ridiculously low price on a bunch of bullets powder and primers which happen to be exactly what you reload at a garage sale last week of course. Then that is the price until you run out.

    For a typical 35 Remington loading, current pricing sees a cost in the vicinity of, or upwards of 52 cents a round using rather pedestrian components and a long life to the brass, which is also a per shot cost amortized over the brass lifetime. Using higher priced specialty bullets like 220 Speers or 200 Flex tips drives costs even higher.

    Realistically there is also a per shot cost for the amortized cost of the reloading equipment, the cost of the gas or shipping needed to obtain the components and whatever other costs accrue in the financial sense when making the ammo, but that is rarely accounted for. And we all figure our time is absolutely free of cost.

    That’s true only in a personal sense. In real terms time is money but hobbies are what we enjoy.
    graymustang likes this.


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