What to load a 255 grain lead as?
Results 1 to 4 of 4
Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By papajohn
  • 1 Post By papajohn

Thread: What to load a 255 grain lead as?



  1. #1
    Tinhorn
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    29
    Member #
    35208
    Thanked
    9 times

    What to load a 255 grain lead as?

    I was given some 255 grain lead Kieth style bullet by my dad. At least that's what he has them marked. Please forgive ignorance, I am novice to reloading, just venturing into it really. When I load these, once I determine how I should go about it, the 10 I will load will be my very first 10. When I go to weigh the bullets, just picked out 4 of them, two was 256.5, one was 257.6, and the last was, 258.8. I know solid lead cast is not going to be exact, but seems as if the last two should be loaded as 260s and the first two should be loaded as 255 grain soild lead. Looking at using a recipe from Modern Reloading, Page 585, Accur #9, 15.8 grains, OAL 1.60. It's for a 255 grain lead bullet.

    Thank you
    Matt

  2. #2
    High Priest of the Powder Hoarders Marlin Fanatic
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Coastal Missouri
    Posts
    17,834
    Member #
    287
    Thanked
    9461 times
    Matt, it sounds like you're trying to make reloading into Rocket Science, and it really isn't. While the reloading manuals sometimes say "Don't ever change ANY of the components we show here or your gun will blow up in your face and you'll be dead or scarred for life and then you'll be really sorry you didn't listen to us", there is still some wiggle room here.

    I think of reloading manuals like cookbooks. Lots of good recipes in there, but every cook changes things a little bit, to suit their own taste. As long as you're not loading hot loads, you have plenty of room to alter the recipe. A slightly heavier bullet or a different primer or thicker brass can bump pressures up, but if you're nowhere near the red line it's not that big a deal. There are a lot of variables involved here, some that are rarely mentioned. But if you understand the basics of what you're doing, what to do or not to do AND WHY, then you're not likely to get yourself in trouble.

    Starting off slowly and taking small steps is a good idea, but don't trip yourself up in the process. Most of the loads I use are right in the middle of the starting and top-end loads, then I adjust them from there to suit my needs. Starting too high is bad, but starting too low isn't much better. What you want are loads that are (1) Safe! (2) Consistent and (3) Accurate and repeatable.

    I'm guessing you're loading for a 45 Colt. What gun? Give us some specifics on what you're using, what you want to accomplish (hunting, paper-punching or plinking), and we'll help you settle on a good load. There are hundreds of accomplished reloaders here, willing and able to help. For free!

    Just a guess, but since you're using AA#9 you're looking at a non-Cowboy-level load, something around 1,000 fps or so, right? In a rifle that would be a fun plinker or target load, and good for hunting small game, maybe even deer up close. I'm hoping you've slugged your bore and measured your bullets to assure a good fit, right? Because all the reading and studying and ballistic knowledge in the world won't help much of your bullets are undersized, you will get horrid accuracy and bad leading. You don't need that kind of aggrevation, especially when you're just getting started.

    There is a steep learning curve, so take your time and ask a lot of questions, we were all new at this back when.

    To (finally) answer your actual question, a few grains difference in bullet weight won't matter enough to be able to tell a difference. Don't worry about minor variations in lead bullets, that's normal.
    matt78 likes this.
    We're at the point where Hamas are freedom fighters and the NRA is a terrorist organization. —Twitter satirist @hale_razor

  3. #3
    Tinhorn
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    29
    Member #
    35208
    Thanked
    9 times
    Thanks Papajohn for taking the time to read my post.
    The type of gun i am reloading for is a 1894 Cowboy Limited in 45 Colt. According to two different Marlin reps, it was manufactured either in 1997 or 2005. The recipe is a starting load for ruger/tc and can work up to never exceed 17.6 grains of AA#9. I have been told by numerous people and have read dozens of different things that my rifle can handle the pressures if using loads for Ruger/TC. I want to use my rifle for deer hunting mainly, so when I saw the recipe I knew that would be the one I would want to use. One of the main reasons why I want to reload is because I can't seem to find factory loads that my rifle will accept in some form or another. I compared Hornady's leverevolution to the recipe and discovered it was on par with it as far as velocity goes. As for measuring the bullet, no not yet, only weighed them to make sure what my dad gave me was what he said they where. As for slugging the bore, please forgive me I am not sure what you mean there. The rifle was given to me by my father and he ran nothing but reloads through the gun, he used everything from lead to Barnes. In fact all of my reloading equipment was given to me by him as well.

    Thanks
    Matt

  4. Remove Advertisements
    MarlinOwners.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    High Priest of the Powder Hoarders Marlin Fanatic
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Coastal Missouri
    Posts
    17,834
    Member #
    287
    Thanked
    9461 times
    Okay, now we know what gun, and can go on from there.

    Slugging the bore involves pushing a soft, lightly-oiled lead plug through your barrel and measuring it to see what size bullet would be the best fit, to reduce gas blow-by and leading. Ideally, you will want your bullet to be one or two thousandths of an inch larger than your groove diameter. Do a search or look in the reference sections for more details on this, it's outlined a lot better than I will go into here.

    There are generally three classes of data for the 45 Colt.........blackpowder level loads, loads for modern guns like your Marlin, and the really heavy stuff for the stoutest of guns. I would use only the middle set, a Marlin is not as strong as a Ruger or TC, because of the rear-locking action. You might not blow yourself up by using the top-tier data, but you don't want to strain an older design, the damage is cumulative and hard to detect until you shoot it loose.

    Lead-bullet loads are generally held to lower pressures and velocities for a couple reasons. For one, soft bullets will lead the bore if pushed too fast, so the idea is to keep the velocities below 1200 fps or so to be on the safe side. Leading is a pain to clean out, it raises pressures and it ruins accuracy, three good reasons to avoid letting it happen. If you need more velocity, a gas checked bullet will let you push the bullet faster without leading. Some folks use harder bullets and that's fine, as long as you match the diameter and the hardness of the bullet to your bore and the burning rate of the powder. It can get complicated, but a little trial-and-error should tell you what works best.

    Since you're shooting a fairly heavy, large diameter bullet you don't need blazing speed. Speed helps to flatten the trajectory, but with blunt nosed pistol bullets it's not going to help you much. Moderation pays dividends, extra performance always has a cost.

    Read as much as you can, there are a dozen really good reloading manuals to be had, and each one will tell you more about the reloading process. Even after numerous years of reloading and experimenting, I still go back and re-read my manuals every so often, to remind me of little tips and tricks I might have forgotten.

    The load you listed looks like it should work fine, and should get you 1200-1300 fps out of your rifle. There are dozens of threads here about loading for the 45 Colt, (aka Long Colt) and it would be to your benefit to read as many as you can find. The joy of reloading is that you re-use the most expensive part of the round, and replace the other three.

    Like I said, it's not Rocket Science but there is a learning curve, and it's important that you not only learn what to do, but what not to do, and why. I read about reloading for several years before I started, and I still had a lot of questions once I tried it. Most folks do. If you can't find the answers here, or in a loading manual, ask. Better safe than sorry, and not everything is obvious when you're still learning the terminology.

    Hope this helps.
    matt78 likes this.
    We're at the point where Hamas are freedom fighters and the NRA is a terrorist organization. —Twitter satirist @hale_razor


Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New | Subscribed Threads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-17-2011, 10:08 PM
  2. 180 grain Federal lead castcore
    By marco in forum 1894
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-18-2011, 12:00 AM
  3. 320 Grain Cast lead loads ?
    By win38-55 in forum The 444 Marlinť
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-23-2011, 07:02 PM
  4. 200 grain cast lead RNFP load data
    By bowhunter472401 in forum Reloading
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-13-2009, 05:43 PM
  5. 300 grain lead hp for guide gun??
    By krazykat in forum The 45/70 Govt.
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-28-2008, 04:56 PM

Search tags for this page

255 grain cast 444 marlin load
,

255 grain cast lead bullets

,
255 grain cast load 444 marlin
,
255 grain cast load in 444 marlin
,
255 grain lead bullet load
,
255 grain lead bullets
,
255 grain lead cast
,
255 grain reloading data
,
255grain lead swc keith style bullets load data for .45 colt
,
how much powder do you use to load a 255 grain bullet for a 444 marlin?
,
load data for cast lead 255 gr 45-70 rifle
,

loading 255 grain bullets

,
using accur #9 powder loads
Click on a term to search for related topics.