Recent "improvements" to Remlin 1894s disqualify them - Page 3
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Thread: Recent "improvements" to Remlin 1894s disqualify them



  1. #21
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    The worst thing is, folks buying a Marlin for the first time are very often going to get a bad impression. A gent came in the other day after his new 336W had seized up at the range. Turned out the carrier pivot screw had gone bye-bye. After installing a replacement I worked the action and it was the so bad it could barely be called functional. I asked the customer if it had felt that way straight out of the box, and he shrugged, and said, "yeah, I just thought that was how it was supposed to feel." I couldn't stand it. I popped out the lever, took a few passes with a file at the rocker release spot on the control blade of the lever, and did away with at least one debilitating stoppage. When I handed it back to the guy he cycled the action, then looked at me like I'd just cured cancer.

    Cheap heroism aside, I guess the upside is that now that Remington isn't hardening steel parts any more, it's much easier to fix things with a file
    Brocky, Ret_Eng, Golphin and 6 others like this.
    Ranger Point Precision (Houston, TX) - We design and manufacture performance firearm parts for Marlin Firearms, Henry Repeating Arms, Winchester, Steyr Arms pistols (Polymer stocks, trigger kits, medium loop levers and takedown screws, peep and fiber optic sights, Marlin 1894 extractors, picatinny scope mounts, dovetail fillers, flyweight loading gates, mag followers and more). rangerpointprecision.com Our new motorcycle parts division can be found at rppmoto.com

  2. #22
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    My 45 colt Marlin Cowboy had a small feed ramp top side of the chambers entrance. Why they stopped doing that is beyond me!
    Even a green horn like myself figured out the extractor was the culprit!

    https://www.marlinowners.com/forum/ja...-s-solved.html

    https://www.marlinowners.com/forum/ja...e-jamming.html
    gunscrewguy and DeoVindice like this.

  3. #23
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    I am afraid everything will go the way of Marlin sooner or later. I hope not. I will just keep buying older guns and trading the cars and trucks when the warranty run s out. I will say the vehicles are better built than the 80's crap but hard as hell to do your own work without a full auto shop. As far as old guns they are a blast not that hard to work on and RPP makes some great accessories.

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmfox3 View Post
    When I look at Ruger they've done some great things to make their line still affordable but not making junk.
    I'm kinda surprised Ruger haven't mobilised on the lever market. I guess it's extra business they don't need... or aren't in a position to commit to at present.
    njcioffi, Octogun and gunscrewguy like this.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
    I'm kinda surprised Ruger haven't mobilised on the lever market. I guess it's extra business they don't need... or aren't in a position to commit to at present.
    I've fantasized about the same, but I reckon the latter statement is prolly close to true. I figure they probably have more to lose than to gain by such a venture. The R&D, tooling, plant space, etc. would be a considerable investment into a market that...well...let's be honest...levers don't fly off the shelf the way ARs do. And we lever-centric folk tend to be a bit more knowledgable and discerning in our purchases than the average 22yo who just cashed his student loan check

    But...maybe someday.
    I don't believe in fairy tales, sermons, or stories about money....but thank you kindly for the cigarette.

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmfox3 View Post
    When I look at Ruger they've done some great things to make their line still affordable but not making junk. The Ruger American rifle is a great example. I was looking for a 22 WMR and couldn't find one 'in stock' for under $600 and some were as high as $800 or $900. Came across a Ruger American for just over $300. It's a great rifle. While it does have a plastic stock the fit and finish are really good. I'd be willing to pay a premium price for a good lever action rifle and many of us do it today w/o giving a second thought. Today there is a Marlin 1894 in 32 H&R magnum with a 'buy it now' price of a paltry $2150. My point, Remington can do this they just need to choose to do so.
    I wonder if Ruger will ever get into the lever gun game? They'd do a good job no doubt, but it has to be a money maker, and Henry is already doing very well in that space. Back to the OP, is there a certain beginning serial number one should watch out for, if looking at Remington/Marlin 1894's?
    njcioffi and gunscrewguy like this.
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  8. #27
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    Wow, 3 posts in a row wondering about Ruger making lever guns... all composed at about the same time. I had not seen these previous two posts when I posted mine. Great minds....
    njcioffi and gunscrewguy like this.
    "You become what you think about." Earl Nightengale

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  9. #28
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    Well, my purchase of a Ruger 77/357 this week instead of waiting for a new 1894c looks better and better.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Octogun View Post
    I wonder if Ruger will ever get into the lever gun game? They'd do a good job no doubt, but it has to be a money maker, and Henry is already doing very well in that space. Back to the OP, is there a certain beginning serial number one should watch out for, if looking at Remington/Marlin 1894's?
    Good question. Without a doubt, things started getting pretty shaky around 2009 when the Remington transition began in earnest. Some of the worst examples I've seen were thrown together in that year, apparently out of spare parts, as there are quite a few JM marked rifles that don't deserve to wear that badge of honor. They weren't all bad, but some of them were truly horrible.

    Even before selling the company, Marlin had begun making some changes to cut costs, like deleting those chamber hoods that aided feeding. But by and large, most Marlins built before the sale were well put together. While Remington has made some effort to improve fit and finish over the last couple of years, my observation has been that these are largely superficial improvements to make the guns look better than they are. Material quality has gone down across the board.

    If you look at an older 1894 you can often see a difference in color between the bolt and receiver. This is owing to the fact that the bolts were hardened to the point they laughed at files. Same with the levers. Not so any more. Both those parts on Remlins are easy to cut. Was it ever necessary to harden them? Maybe, maybe not, but I find it laudable that back in the day they just built them as heirlooms and didn't quibble over saving a few bucks on heat treating. I have a Savage 99 featherweight takedown, circa 1922, that is so beautifully machined and finished it makes my heart ache to look at it. And that was when people, not robots, did the work.

    I'm no fool. I understand the concepts of inflation and globalism. But I'm willing to pay more for quality, and I think there are enough like minds out there to keep an honest business in the black. It's kept our families fed.

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  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerPointPrecision View Post
    Good question. Without a doubt, things started getting pretty shaky around 2009 when the Remington transition began in earnest. Some of the worst examples I've seen were thrown together in that year, apparently out of spare parts, as there are quite a few JM marked rifles that don't deserve to wear that badge of honor. They weren't all bad, but some of them were truly horrible.

    Even before selling the company, Marlin had begun making some changes to cut costs, like deleting those chamber hoods that aided feeding. But by and large, most Marlins built before the sale were well put together. While Remington has made some effort to improve fit and finish over the last couple of years, my observation has been that these are largely superficial improvements to make the guns look better than they are. Material quality has gone down across the board.

    If you look at an older 1894 you can often see a difference in color between the bolt and receiver. This is owing to the fact that the bolts were hardened to the point they laughed at files. Same with the levers. Not so any more. Both those parts on Remlins are easy to cut. Was it ever necessary to harden them? Maybe, maybe not, but I find it laudable that back in the day they just built them as heirlooms and didn't quibble over saving a few bucks on heat treating. I have a Savage 99 featherweight takedown, circa 1922, that is so beautifully machined and finished it makes my heart ache to look at it. And that was when people, not robots, did the work.

    I'm no fool. I understand the concepts of inflation and globalism. But I'm willing to pay more for quality, and I think there are enough like minds out there to keep an honest business in the black. It's kept our families fed.

    AD

    Thanks for sharing this info - it's a shame what's happening with a once great brand like Marlin. I used to think all of the talk about how great guns used to be was a bit of hyperbole until I bought some old guns. I bought a Smith & Wesson revolver made in like 1911 ... it was a 32 s&w long. The finish was worn, the action was a little stiff, but the gun shoots like a laser (very accurate) and when I look closely I can see how well made it is. The roll marks and lettering are so fine, the machining and finishing are so fine, etc.. Aside from the effects of time and neglect, the gun is still a really well made machine.

    I also bought a used colt lightweight commander made in the late 1950's (IIRC ... some forum member at a 1911 forum looked it up for me). The gun is so nicely made. The finish is abused (previous owner obviously carried it a lot... the side of the receiver that would sit agains the body on a right handed shooter was well worn) but if I look very carefully at the metal work, polish and finish, again, its much nicer than on any new production gun that i've ever seen. The roll mark on that older Colt is so clear and clean and fine (even the little pony on the roll mark). someone really spent the time to finish the gun properly.

    I like modern efficiency, but not at the expense of reliability. Also, as others pointed out, for something like a lever gun, I'm willing to shell out a few more bucks to get a quality piece that I can pass on to my kids. Anyway, I think the gun makers are in a bind... Folks today like AR's and polymer guns, and they would prefer to hunt with something like a Ruger American (which is a great rifle, but very utilitarian and not much of an heirloom piece).

    I wish that Remington would turn things around, but I'm not hopeful.
    Last edited by cynergyou; 01-11-2016 at 06:48 PM.


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