Good cameras?
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Thread: Good cameras?



  1. #1
    Tenderfoot
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    Good cameras?


    Well here is my story. I've never really been into photography or anything of that nature. But my dad decides about 2-3 years ago that he doesn't want to pay 800-1000 for a professional photographer to take pictures at my sisters Quincenera. So he goes out and buys a Sony DSLR a100.
    I tried to learn what I could and took some pictures but I'd like to learn how to take better pictures with this thing.
    I'm thinking of buying another camera and was wondering if this one is good or should I look into another camera. Any info would be great.
    Last edited by johncina15; 10-20-2019 at 01:11 AM.

  2. #2
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    Welcome from Alabama... You posted in the wrong forum, there is a photography forum... I'm moving it there...
    johncina15 likes this.
    Bart

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    Marlin Marksman
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    don't know about the sony, I use a nikon d90, its a few years old and still gets the job done.
    canon and nikon are the standards. My last trip into best buy was an eye opener
    It now costs about $5k to get a top of the line camera and lens setup.
    for mear mortals like me one of those Nikon package deals at sams club was all thats needed
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  5. #4
    Gunfighter
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    I have several digital cameras, but my best pictures seem to come from my Samsung Galaxy S7 phone. It's excellent for outdoors with natural light.

    20191014_143931.jpg
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  6. #5
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    Cameras are like guns. If you're really into cameras, you will have one for each different purpose. And it takes a while to learn how to use them to their full potentials.

    I've often thought I'd like one of the digital SLRs, but I wouldn't use it enough to justify the expense.

    My last camera purchase was a Nikon Coolpix 610. This one has an extendable lens from 1x to 60x. Or from 35mm to 1440mm. The whole thing is no larger than a regular SLR. The view finders are a screen on the back and also a eyepiece that views a small screen similar to a SLR. Focusing is electronic, but it does a very good job.

    The advantages of an expensive SLR are the extended battery life, the ability to shoot 8 or more frames a second for an extended period. They are almost infinitely programmable, but it's the equivalent of a college course to learn how, and more importantly, what the differences are and what they do for the pictures.

    There are "How To" books available for most individual models of mid level cameras. The one for the Nikon 610 was about $20 and it explains everything the camera does. Even after going through it, I still need to refer back to it for some things.

    If you're ready for an expensive SLR, you will know it when you find a bunch of things want your present camera to do, but it won't. And if you don't use PhotoShop regularly to edit your photos, you probably don't need a SLR.

    Don't get hung up on the number of pixels. Unless you plan to enlarge photos beyond 8x10, 12 megapixels are plenty. More than that are expensive, and slow down the time between shots.

    I'm not pushing Nikon. Canon and Sony also make excellent cameras.

    For your purposes, you probably don't need to spend over 500.00. But if you're shooting an event, be sure to have at least 4 extra charged batteries and a couple extra memory cards. ( I get around 100 shots per battery or fewer if I'm also using the flash.)

    Personally, I'm glad I didn't shell out the $$$ for a SLR.
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  7. #6
    Sidewinder
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    Quote Originally Posted by HIKayaker View Post
    Cameras are like guns. If you're really into cameras, you will have one for each different purpose. And it takes a while to learn how to use them to their full potentials.

    I've often thought I'd like one of the digital SLRs, but I wouldn't use it enough to justify the expense.

    My last camera purchase was a Nikon Coolpix 610. This one has an extendable lens from 1x to 60x. Or from 35mm to 1440mm. The whole thing is no larger than a regular SLR. The view finders are a screen on the back and also a eyepiece that views a small screen similar to a SLR. Focusing is electronic, but it does a very good job.

    The advantages of an expensive SLR are the extended battery life, the ability to shoot 8 or more frames a second for an extended period. They are almost infinitely programmable, but it's the equivalent of a college course to learn how, and more importantly, what the differences are and what they do for the pictures.

    There are "How To" books available for most individual models of mid level cameras. The one for the Nikon 610 was about $20 and it explains everything the camera does. Even after going through it, I still need to refer back to it for some things.

    If you're ready for an expensive SLR, you will know it when you find a bunch of things want your present camera to do, but it won't. And if you don't use PhotoShop regularly to edit your photos, you probably don't need a SLR.

    Don't get hung up on the number of pixels. Unless you plan to enlarge photos beyond 8x10, 12 megapixels are plenty. More than that are expensive, and slow down the time between shots.

    I'm not pushing Nikon. Canon and Sony also make excellent cameras.

    For your purposes, you probably don't need to spend over 500.00. But if you're shooting an event, be sure to have at least 4 extra charged batteries and a couple extra memory cards. ( I get around 100 shots per battery or fewer if I'm also using the flash.)

    Personally, I'm glad I didn't shell out the $$$ for a SLR.
    First of all, I agree with your advice to the OP both in terms of budget and accessories.

    Regarding your point about similarities between usage of guns and cameras, I agree that it's also true but you left out another important similarity. Once you get into either with a vengeance, it's hard to determine which endeavor is more expensive. For a long time, for me, guns were the things on which I spent money - hand guns, long guns, and ammo.

    Then I got interested in photography thanks to a shooting buddy who's also a photojournalist. This is a cautionary tale.

    It started innocently enough with a Nikon Coolpix P530, a little brother to your Nikon P610 but with less zoom, 42X (24 to 1,000mm in 35mm equivalent terms). Then came a Coolpix B700, the successor to your P610, that also has 60X zoom but added the ability to capture RAW files as well as JPEGs. I've got some wonderful building, landscape and wildlife images with it. I thought I was done but I was wrong. Nikon released the Coolpix P1000 with 125X zoom. That's 24 to 3,000mm in 35mm equivalent terms. Yikes! I had to have one for the extremely distant wildlife shots. Ok, now I was really done, but wait, there's more - the Coolpix A1000, a pocket size goodie with 35X zoom. It's perfect for photos of opportunity in close quarters but gives plenty of "reach" if needed. As you noted, each camera has a purpose. BTW, the A1000 might be a reasonable choice for the OP.

    Since my pal gets paid to take pictures, you can imagine that his equipment is much more sophisticated than mine. When we began to share an interest in photography, he was using the very latest in mirrorless, full frame, digital camera bodies and several replaceable lenses. As expensive as digital SLR and mirrorless camera bodies can be, the replaceable lenses that they require add a whole new level of expense. You can see where this going. After while, I began to wonder about what I could do with a DSLR so down the rabbit hole I went...again! To date, I've acquired two DSLR camera bodies (Nikon D5600 and D7500) and six lenses ranging from ultra wide angle (10mm focal length) for landscapes to telephoto (600mm focal length) for wildlife. Both camera bodies and all but two of the lenses were either refurbished or used so there's been a modicum of cost control. The equipment has been flawless and the images I've captured have been great when - just like with guns - I do my part.

    Am I done? I know I'd be lying if I said yes. OTOH, am I having fun? Absolutely! I took guns and cameras on this summer's road trip and enjoyed using both. Here are a couple of images using the D7500 and the telephoto lens.



    Last edited by bluzman; 11-07-2019 at 04:03 PM.
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    Spaaaaammmmm!!!!!!
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  9. #8
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    I use a Coolpix P900 and it is all I need these days. I can zoom out and get pictures that are pretty good of different birds and animals in my area and I don't need to spend a lot of time learning to use it. I sure would not do a photo shoot for anyone though.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by johncina15 View Post

    Well here is my story. I've never really been into photography or anything of that nature. But my dad decides about 2-3 years ago that he doesn't want to pay 800-1000 for a professional photographer to take pictures at my sisters Quincenera. So he goes out and buys a Sony DSLR a100.
    I tried to learn what I could and took some pictures but I'd like to learn how to take better pictures with this thing.
    I'm thinking of buying another camera and was wondering if this one is good or should I look into another camera. Any info would be great.
    First thing to ask yourself is what do you want to do with the photos you take. Social media with friends and family - your camera is just fine. Then what *kinds( of pictures - landscapes, people, events, street, architecture, real estate - the subjects are as many as you can think of what you see.
    Second thing is understanding when you start thinking DSLR with interchangeable lenses you don't worry about the camera body - you start looking for lenses that do what you want and fit a budget. You marry into a family once you start buying lenses because that's where most of your money will go.
    I've been doing photography semi-professionally for decades so I know more than a little bit about it. I would not compare with guns at all unless it was an AR style since those you can mix and match parts.
    First thing to do is get a decent book and learn basics - that will tell you how interested you really are.
    I recommend most books by Tom Ang - he has a good teaching style and is very approachable.
    The next thing you need to realize is that you need to learn editing. There are many good software packages out there but I no longer recommend Adobe products because they are now a licensing scheme where you never own the product - you stop paying it stops working.
    Look at ON1 PhotoRaw or Affinity Photo both which have free trials.
    Holler if you need more 'splainin.
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