.303 British ammo in Afghanistan
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  1. #1
    Deadeye
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    .303 British ammo in Afghanistan

    Have found the following .303 Headstamps. All ammo berdan primed

    British factories
    /|\ = UK Government Property. Formerly the badge of the Sidney family, the broad arrow (or "Devil's Claws") symbol was appropriated by the British government to indicate the item was government issue
    The 'Z' suffix Refers to graphite glazed nitro-cellulose propellant

    B/|\E
    Royal Ordnance Factory, Blackpole, Worcester, UK
    Ball, Mk VII 1941 dated

    K or KYNOCH
    Kynoch & Co, Witton, Birmingham, UK.
    Ball, Mk VIIZ 1918 dated
    Ball Mk VII 1933 and 1937 dated
    Armor Piercing, W Mk I 1940 and 1941 dated

    K5
    Imperial Chemical Industries Kynoch factory at Kidderminster, Worcestershire., UK
    Armor Piercing, W Mk I 1942 dated

    R/|\L
    Royal Laboratory, Woolwich Arsenal, Kent, UK. Woolwich Arsenal, of which the Royal Laboratory was only a part, is situated in South East London on the River Thames. Arsenal est in 1670
    Ball, Mk VII 1941 dated

    Canadian factories
    DAC
    Dominion Arsenal, Quebec, Canada
    Ball, Mk VII 1941 and 1942 dated

    DI
    Defence Industries, Verdun, Canada
    Ball, Mk VII Z 1942 dated

    Indian factories
    K/|\F
    Indian Government Ammunition Factory Kirkee (or Kirkee Arsenal), near Poona, INDIA
    Ball, Mk VII 1936, 1938 and 1942

    Some cases are sterile and those have copper jacketed bullets. Guns I get to shoot the ammo out of BREN Mk 2 LMG, Pattern 1914 (Remington produced) and a No 1 Mk III (GRI, 1945)
    IMG_6234.jpgIMG_6235.jpgIMG_6236.jpg

    CD
    De Oppresso Liber

    Iraq 91,03,04,05,06,08,09, 15 & 16'
    Afganistan 09,10,11,14,17,18 & 19'
    TEAM 1894 ~ Member#53

  2. #2
    Certified Gunnut
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    Quote Originally Posted by Combat Diver View Post
    Have found the following .303 Headstamps. All ammo berdan primed

    British factories
    /|\ = UK Government Property. Formerly the badge of the Sidney family, the broad arrow (or "Devil's Claws") symbol was appropriated by the British government to indicate the item was government issue
    The 'Z' suffix Refers to graphite glazed nitro-cellulose propellant

    B/|\E
    Royal Ordnance Factory, Blackpole, Worcester, UK
    Ball, Mk VII 1941 dated

    K or KYNOCH
    Kynoch & Co, Witton, Birmingham, UK.
    Ball, Mk VIIZ 1918 dated
    Ball Mk VII 1933 and 1937 dated
    Armor Piercing, W Mk I 1940 and 1941 dated

    K5
    Imperial Chemical Industries Kynoch factory at Kidderminster, Worcestershire., UK
    Armor Piercing, W Mk I 1942 dated

    R/|\L
    Royal Laboratory, Woolwich Arsenal, Kent, UK. Woolwich Arsenal, of which the Royal Laboratory was only a part, is situated in South East London on the River Thames. Arsenal est in 1670
    Ball, Mk VII 1941 dated

    Canadian factories
    DAC
    Dominion Arsenal, Quebec, Canada
    Ball, Mk VII 1941 and 1942 dated

    DI
    Defence Industries, Verdun, Canada
    Ball, Mk VII Z 1942 dated

    Indian factories
    K/|\F
    Indian Government Ammunition Factory Kirkee (or Kirkee Arsenal), near Poona, INDIA
    Ball, Mk VII 1936, 1938 and 1942

    Some cases are sterile and those have copper jacketed bullets. Guns I get to shoot the ammo out of BREN Mk 2 LMG, Pattern 1914 (Remington produced) and a No 1 Mk III (GRI, 1945)
    IMG_6234.jpgIMG_6235.jpgIMG_6236.jpg

    CD
    Very cool
    My not so local gun shop has a bunch of the Pakistan ammo.
    I bought a box just to add to my decor.
    32 cartridges to a box.dated 5 Aug 1966 303 inch MK7 c.i.a.
    (P) p.o.l.
    Supporter of USA Olympic shooting Team
    Since 1987.
    Team Oliver Tractor 550

  3. #3
    Deadeye
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    It's enough to bring a tear to the eye of any shooter from a Commonwealth country that were issued with .303's.
    Prickle Farmer

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  5. #4
    Gun Wizard
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    Actually we more commonly call the three prongs a crows foot. Supposed to be an arrow. Denoted government property.

    The most curious .303 round I ever found was with a wooden bullet. Not a drill round, loaded with cordite. Someone said it was for training, there would have been a device to split the wood as it emerged. An early BFA. No idea if true.
    'Diligentia Vis Celeritas'

    Its not what difficulties life throws at us, but how we face them that defines us....

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tranteruk View Post
    Actually we more commonly call the three prongs a crows foot. Supposed to be an arrow. Denoted government property.

    The most curious .303 round I ever found was with a wooden bullet. Not a drill round, loaded with cordite. Someone said it was for training, there would have been a device to split the wood as it emerged. An early BFA. No idea if true.
    I was told that these were a grenade launching round to propel the Mills bomb from a cup discharger. Supposedly there was a version with a paper mache' bullet also... cannot find a reference in any of my books, so this may not be correct, but would appreciate any clarification from anybody who knows. - Thanks to Zuku in SA for info below:

    CORRECTION! "Cartridge S.A. Blank .303 inch L Mark VII" originally designed for Vickers and BREN fitted with special attachments to turn the bullet into small non-lethal chips.

    Warning: The wooden tip is not a blank and must be treated as a normal bullet
    . The Army used it for cheap training with the .303 the same as they used plastic bullets for the R1. However with age the wood tips will crack and splinter and will disintegrate when leaving the barrel. When they used it in the 60 and 70's the woodtips would penetrate the backwall like a normal bullet and will defenitely kill someone at 100m or more. Latter on they modified it for the MG as the other posters explained
    Last edited by Outpost75; 12-24-2018 at 11:58 AM.
    The ENEMY Is Listening
    HE wants to know what YOU know.
    Keep it to yourself.

  7. #6
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    That's all good info guys thanks
    cajun56 likes this.
    Supporter of USA Olympic shooting Team
    Since 1987.
    Team Oliver Tractor 550

  8. #7
    Gunfighter
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    Just another example of a failed seventh phase in UW.
    cajun56 likes this.

  9. #8
    Gun Wizard
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    Here's a good story. I once went into a suppliers in the 80s and asked if the guy had any .303 ammo. He came out with a large bucket full of loose rounds, no charge. I looked at them and they were all WW1 dated. I declined them, suggested they may not even go off. Later I found out they were selling WW1 dated rounds to collectors for a fiver a piece. Ah well. Someone once said 'you never miss what you never had'. So he never lost any body parts!.
    'Diligentia Vis Celeritas'

    Its not what difficulties life throws at us, but how we face them that defines us....

  10. #9
    Deadeye
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    No issues with the 1918 dated ammo firing out of the P14 today. Hundred years later working and hitting as designed.

    IMG_6266_jpg-789836.JPG

    CD
    De Oppresso Liber

    Iraq 91,03,04,05,06,08,09, 15 & 16'
    Afganistan 09,10,11,14,17,18 & 19'
    TEAM 1894 ~ Member#53

  11. #10
    Tinhorn
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    we in the UK and others refer to the broad arrow symbol as the sign of Crows Foot Engineering or more correctly as a pheon. I've used WW2 .303 in the '70s and found it best to select the same date and maker into batches otherwise it groups all over the place, re-sight when changing batches.


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