Remlins: Who's at Fault? - Page 2
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Thread: Remlins: Who's at Fault?



  1. #11
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    I lay the blame on Mammon, the Devil of Covetousness. The greedy pursuit of gain causes quality, pride in workmanship, and concern for the customer to fall by the wayside. He works his way into men's souls, and replaces God with gold.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobshouse View Post
    They have to put them out faster than they did back in the days of high quality control. Todays profits means pushing them out the door as fast as you can and dealing with the problems later on.
    I was going to put it a similar way and say that today's production methods are less labor intensive and more automated. Yes, modern firearms are not up to the standards of the 1950's with regard to fit, finish, and function...but if that's the quality level you desire, an average lever gun would probably cost at least $2000, maybe more. A Custom Shop 1895 Hunter has a current MSRP of $1995...and the 1895 "fancy color case" is a whopping $3795 !! Me personally, I'm OK with the new Remlins costing hundreds instead of thousands. I prefer to polish and hone the innards myself, replace factory parts with upgraded aftermarket parts, and work out any bugs if need be. I don't think new production guns from ANY manufacturer are all negatives. Technology has its perks and things like tolerances and the quality/consistency of steel are IMO superior to guns made long ago.

    EDIT: Here is a quote from Gabe Suarez who says it better than I did above: "Ignore all the naysayers that bemoan the poor quality of the modern lever action rifle. Today all American mass produced weapons will in fact need a trip to the custom gunsmith to make them into what they should be. That is a fact of life. Why is that? Because most gun buyers look at price first and only and gun companies have to present their wares at a price point that appeals to the masses. If you want excellence, buy whatever you want and take it to a custom shop to make it the way it should be."

    Source:
    https://blog.suarezinternational.com...ion-rifle.html
    Last edited by -69.55; 07-23-2019 at 08:07 AM.
    .45-70 = -69.55

  3. #13
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    Who is at fault?

    Seriously guys - the FAMILY sold out after the old man died.

    Blame the family that they had NO interest in maintaining the Marlin brand. All they cared about was a big fat check.
    Cowboy23*, -69.55, GFK and 1 others like this.

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  5. #14
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    Merde rolls down hill.

    Top management always sets the expectations.
    They do this through intentional policy or fiscal constraints.

    In the computer world, the manufacturers opted to use cheap Chinese capacitors instead of quality Japanese caps.
    This destroyed Abit Corp, who died under the onslaught of lawsuits.
    This came about because a bean counter didn't want to spend the extra $0.50 per board for quality caps.
    Dell had a very long running program of exchanging CCS populated boards with Japanese populated boards.

    This was intentional, with devastating results.
    Poor labor practices is also intentional.
    I find it hard to believe the only quality gun smith artisans are in New Haven CT.
    Remlin moved to NY, and apparently few of those artisans went with them.
    Management failed to offer significant inducement (read: salary) to attract quality talent.

    Throw in the hedge-fund mentality of playing games with company assets (read: Sears, K-Mart) and you have Remlin.
    I bought a new 2019 production 1894CB, and apparently I got lucky.
    gunscrewguy likes this.
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  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by truckjohn View Post
    Who is at fault?

    Seriously guys - the FAMILY sold out after the old man died.

    Blame the family that they had NO interest in maintaining the Marlin brand. All they cared about was a big fat check.

    Your info is wrong. Frank Kenna was alive at the time of the sale. Remington/Freedom Group promised him they wouldn't change anything. They lied.
    Last edited by rob42049; 07-23-2019 at 11:38 AM.
    gunscrewguy, Ret_Eng and Tomray like this.
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  7. #16
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    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by truckjohn View Post
    Who is at fault?

    Seriously guys - the FAMILY sold out after the old man died.

    Blame the family that they had NO interest in maintaining the Marlin brand. All they cared about was a big fat check.
    Can't blame the family. There was no one in the family that had the work experience in the mfg plant to run the company.

    When Freedom Group took over, they said "Anyone could make lever guns" WRONG. They decided to cut operations to cut costs, so one of their first moves was to CHEAPEN the product. From reading what former employees of Marlin have said over the years, the stocks were being made somewhere that was not in close proximity to the metal working factory. So stocks were not checked against the metal work of the rifles on a regular basis. If stocks were shipped to the metal working plant and were found not to fit, apparently, they tried to hand fit them to the rifle. It didn't work.

    Of all the Remlins I checked since the Freedom Group took over, the biggest glaring fit problem was the stocks did not fit the rifle. I checked different caliber rifles and that problem was across the entire line. Obviously I could only check the rifles that the dealers had within driving distance of my house, so I can't say that the fit was bad on every caliber rife.

    But other cost cutting decisions where obvious on Remlins. No more shiny Receiver finish as was the case of JM Marlins. Instead a matted finish that obviously less expensive to make. Then there was the problem with eliminated heat treating of ammunition handling components in their rifles. Remlins were not made for anyone that intended to shoot a couple thousand rounds.

    The rifles didn't always cycle smoothly, especially early during the take over period. Drooping barrels and canted sights added to the lack of QC. The list goes on.

    There are no Marlin Rifles being made anymore. After getting thousands of poor quality rifles returned and losing their shirt for years, they declared bankruptcy. Serves them Right.

    Every Henry rifle I ever handled (in different calibers) were fine looking rifles. Cycled smoothly, beautiful fit and finish, quality stocks. Sure, they're more expensive than what Marlins use to sell for in the genuine Marlin days. You get what you pay for.

    I gave up on Marlin after what they did to the employees of the original Marlin Factory. I don't buy anything with the Remington Outdoor's name on it and never will.



    Mike T.
    Last edited by miket156; 07-23-2019 at 09:52 AM.
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  8. #17
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    One can not 'just smooth and hone' things out to make a gun operate correctly. If a part has a rough surface finish causing problems it could be honed and polished to a point it would be undersized and out of print. If the part was made at maximum material you may have a chance to rescue it. IF one has the skills, time, desire and doesn't remove case hardened material down to dead soft metal.

    One would never consider doing a tune up to a brand new car that wasn't running right!

    AC
    Last edited by gunscrewguy; 07-23-2019 at 11:40 AM.
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  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by truckjohn View Post
    Who is at fault?

    Seriously guys - the FAMILY sold out after the old man died.

    Blame the family that they had NO interest in maintaining the Marlin brand. All they cared about was a big fat check.
    Unfortunately such is the fate of family owned business---I think Winchester followed a similar path. The new generation just wants to cash in and party.
    miket156 and gunscrewguy like this.

  10. #19
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    I just bought a Henry Frontier 22LR that is still in transit to my FFL.
    It will be interesting to see if there is an obvious quality improvement over my new Marlin.

    I researched long and deep into both, and concluded the 1894CB was better suited for my CAS needs.
    I fully plan on tweaking it up with the primo aftermarket parts available for it.

    Same idea as taking a basic Chevy 350, and tossing in a good cam, headers and intake system.
    Today, this is illegal.. but I can still hotrod my Marlin.
    miket156 and gunscrewguy like this.
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  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunscrewguy View Post
    One can not 'just smooth and hone' things out to make a gun operate correctly. If a part has a rough surface finish causing problems it could be honed and polished to a point it would be undersized and out of print. If the part was made at maximum material you may have a chance to rescue it. IF one has the skills, time, desire and doesn't remove case hardened material down to dead soft metal.

    AC
    Very true---The hardened surface is very thin (.001-.002). If you are not careful you can wear through it. I only take the sharp edges off of parts---just enough to just break the edge. When polishing I use abrasive rubber---not a grinding wheel. There is only so much that can be done to a rough part. I think it is better to inspect and choose a gun that shows better machining to start with. Like the ones that come out after the tooling has been changed and is sharp versus one at the end of the run that maybe got shaped by dull tooling. You know the old saying----You can polish a turd but then you will just end up with a shiny turd.
    miket156, Ret_Eng, JACKTW and 2 others like this.


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