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  1. #41
    Deadeye
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stu925 View Post
    I've dabble in knife making and leatherwork myself so I understand the work that went into both the knife and sheath. They both look great and from what I've heard of old leaf springs that steel should make a great blade. As others have said the profile on the blade is excellent, I really like the false swedge, looks awesome. I think you made the right choice with the handle scales too that coco bola is beautiful and is one of my favorite woods. Is the guard soldered on or pinnned? I can't tell from the pictures. Great work you should be proud. You may want to consider buying yourself a 2"x72" grinder and making them to sell, I'm sure they would sell well.

    Stu
    Thanks Stu! I've seen your outstanding work and it was you and a couple others on here that kept me thinking about that steel. I thought the guard was too thin to be pinned. My old Craftsman 2"x42" is what I'm working with now. If I were to begin making more, I'd look at a 72" and other equipment. I like the gauges and jigs for saber grinds and some of the finishes people were getting with ceramic media in tumblers. It was my first time working with cocobolo and it was one of the most satisfying parts of the project. It shapes easily and it's hard to mess up the finish! I used a few coats of tung oil, but I honestly don't think it needed anything. Keep us posted on your next project!

    Quote Originally Posted by BubbaJon View Post
    BTW - old sawblades and lawn mower blades make decent knives as well.
    Heat 'em to red hot to anneal, grind or file to shape. You can just use a torch to heat the edge and just edge quench.
    As mentioned steel becomes non-magnetic when it reaches temperature to quench but as long as it's bright cherry red you're likely good.
    But I bet you already figgered most of that out given that nice blade you made.
    It's funny, but I used up one hacksaw blade and started on another when I made my first cut into that spring. Luckily, we had some unseasonably warm days and cold nights in December, so I tossed that stock into the wood stove and let it go overnight and into the next day cooling 3-4 times. When it came out, my files were able to bite and I was able to take the slight bend out from its former life. You're right, I used the magnet trick and quenched in vegetable oil. Tempering was done in the kitchen oven. I read that you should add thermal mass like sand or bricks to prevent temperature fluctuations in a cooking oven so, I placed my cast iron muffin pan upside down in a larger cast iron skillet and the blank rested easily on its spine down the middle of the muffin pan. It was also an opportunity to put a little extra season on that skillet! Simple people have simple ways.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by kah64 View Post
    Tempering was done in the kitchen oven. I read that you should add thermal mass like sand or bricks to prevent temperature fluctuations in a cooking oven so, I placed my cast iron muffin pan upside down in a larger cast iron skillet and the blank rested easily on its spine down the middle of the muffin pan. It was also an opportunity to put a little extra season on that skillet! Simple people have simple ways.
    Outstanding example of McGuivering!!
    We were just having a discussion on multiple thermal cyclings to improve the grain.
    I'm really not sure how much thermal stability plays into it but I DO know wood (and coal) stoves so prolly a good idea.
    An interesting read is how the Japanese swordmasters forge a Katana.
    Their "forge" for the initial steel is literally melt ore in a trench in sand. More like a luau
    So what did you use to get the steel up to quench temperature?
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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by BubbaJon View Post
    Outstanding example of McGuivering!!
    We were just having a discussion on multiple thermal cyclings to improve the grain.
    I'm really not sure how much thermal stability plays into it but I DO know wood (and coal) stoves so prolly a good idea.
    An interesting read is how the Japanese swordmasters forge a Katana.
    Their "forge" for the initial steel is literally melt ore in a trench in sand. More like a luau
    So what did you use to get the steel up to quench temperature?
    I built a good hardwood fire outside with seasoned white oak and apple until I had a deep bed of coals. It was easily brought to a red/orange non-magnetic state with my heat gun used as a blower.

    Speaking of McGuivering....I went on-line and saw the deer track leather stamps for as much as $17 from some leather crafters. My solution was an old slotted screw, short piece of dowel and five minutes with a file. With this piece of aerospace engineering and a nail set, I made the deer tracks on the sheath.




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  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by kah64 View Post
    Speaking of McGuivering....I went on-line and saw the deer track leather stamps for as much as $17 from some leather crafters. My solution was an old slotted screw, short piece of dowel and five minutes with a file. With this piece of aerospace engineering and a nail set, I made the deer tracks on the sheath.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Great Idea, thanks for sharing.
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  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reload View Post
    Great Idea, thanks for sharing.
    Thanks Reload! I appreciate your comments. With some imagination, a person could create some simple repeatable patterns for basic tooling. I'm impressed by what talented hands can do with the most basic of stamps.

    Keith
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  7. #46
    Tenderfoot
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    Many springs are made from SAE 1070 spring steel or a similar grade.
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  8. #47
    Tenderfoot
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    There was a knife maker in Montana many years ago who used Studebaker leaf springs to make his early knives. His name was Rudy Ruana. I have one of his knives (from the 70s) but I think it’s made of carbon steel. I don’t think it’s from a leaf spring but it holds a great edge.
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  9. #48
    Gun Wizard
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    I think the blade grind looks fantastic. I think you will get many years of service out of that and pass it down to youngins.
    V
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  10. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by HondoLane View Post
    There was a knife maker in Montana many years ago who used Studebaker leaf springs to make his early knives. His name was Rudy Ruana. I have one of his knives (from the 70s) but I think it’s made of carbon steel. I don’t think it’s from a leaf spring but it holds a great edge.
    Studebaker steel is pretty scarce these days! Maybe in some old forgotten warehouse in South Bend. It was before my time, but my Dad had a Studebaker truck in the forties.

    Ruana sounded familiar. After reading your comment, I spent some time on their website. They have some really incredible knives. It's great that you have a vintage one from the founder. According to their website, they even want to buy them back. Keep yours close!

    Keith

  11. #50
    Tinhorn
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    Very nice, beautiful knife. You have to be very proud of it. I would certainly be proud to own it's twin. I hope that you will soon show more of them.
    kah64 likes this.


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