H&R "Expert" - Long-Barreled 22 Top-Break - Page 2
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Thread: H&R "Expert" - Long-Barreled 22 Top-Break



  1. #11
    Tenderfoot
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old No7 View Post
    Sure, I can help...

    As there is no "Cylinder lockup" or locking bolt in the frame (and locking notch on the cylinder), your H&R Expert is a long-barreled variation on the H&R Auto Ejecting Series -- on those guns, only pressure from the hand (some call it a "lever" or "pawl") keeps the cylinder at (or close to...) top-dead-center when the hammer drops. Over many years, especially if it was abused by rapid firing or spinning of the cylinder, the tip of the hand wears and it won't be as good as when it was new.

    But do this first though...

    Don't just test for "wiggle" in the cylinder when it is cocked in the single action mode. Open the top-break action and tip the barrel down. Now cock the hammer single action, and then closely watch the hand as you pull the trigger -- the frame will stop the hammer -- but you should see the tip of the hand rise up slightly, which confirms it is pressure from the hand that secures the lockup.

    Now do this...

    Close the action, cock it single action and pull the trigger (use a once-shot 22 as a snapcap) and KEEP the trigger pulled back -- and NOW check for any wiggle in the cylinder lockup. If it's not too worn, it should feel much tighter for you. Checking it with the trigger released will lower the hand and should feel much looser...

    This could be your only issue and maybe no parts are needed. (FYI, the esteemed Colt Python's have the same type of lockup... Feels a bit sloppy in SA when cocked -- but locks up tighter than a vault once the trigger is pulled and held).

    If you do need some parts, search on Numrich/Gun Parts for "Old Model Large Frame Automatic". (With "automatic" meaning the ejection of the spent cases -- not the reloading of unfired ammo.)

    Good luck.

    Old No7
    Thank you! I wasn't sure if I would get a response, I'm happy with the lock up for now and I have a new hand on the way just in case but my question now is what does the cylinder stop look like? I don't want to hammer out these pins to check and like I said there aren't exploded diagrams for the special, expert or old frame auto ejector. It's the only thing I have to do guesswork on, and although it's probably not something I need to replace right now I would like to cover all my bases.

    photo1.jpg Here's a photo of my expert, and that cylinder stop on the bottom of the frame is what I would like to replace.

    i
    267570.jpg269460.jpg Here's what I suspect they COULD be but since I have no schematic or tools to crack this I'm hoping someone knows.


    Or alternatively is that part in my photo part of the trigger? Here's a photo of the 7 shot special trigger and it seems to have that hump.

    1108930.jpg

  2. #12
    Sidewinder
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dravenguild View Post
    Thank you! I wasn't sure if I would get a response, I'm happy with the lock up for now and I have a new hand on the way just in case but my question now is what does the cylinder stop look like? I don't want to hammer out these pins to check...

    photo1.jpg Here's a photo of my expert, and that cylinder stop on the bottom of the frame is what I would like to replace.

    i
    267570.jpg269460.jpg Here's what I suspect they COULD be but since I have no schematic or tools to crack this I'm hoping someone knows.


    Or alternatively is that part in my photo part of the trigger? Here's a photo of the 7 shot special trigger and it seems to have that hump.

    1108930.jpg
    You are correct -- the hump on the trigger is the "stop", but note there is no rectangular notch on the cylinder; so it is indeed a "cylinder stop" on the top of the trigger, and not the same as the cylinder locking bolt your other picture shows (part on the right, like you would see on an H&R 999 Sportsman).

    The trick to reassembling the H&Rs which have the sear/sear spring captured in the trigger guard, is to whittle a wood toothpick to size, then putting that in the rear trigger guard hole to secure the sear and sear spring. That "slave pin" then holds them captive while you reassemble, and then use the real rear pin to push out the slave pin once the trigger guard is placed in the frame correctly. (You'd need 3 hands otherwise and still won't get it, so use a slave pin from the start and save an hour of frustration. Ask me how I know this...)

    Have fun with it, and good luck.

    Old No7
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