Percussion revolver
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Thread: Percussion revolver



  1. #1
    Gun Wizard
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    Percussion revolver

    Hi guys. I have a chance to buy an Original Colt 1860 Army .44 cal percussion revolver. It was built in 1867 and is considered an antique in Canada. The seller is a reputable gun store I have dealt with before and they say it is in good useable condition. It wouldn't be my first choice but because it is an antique I could carry it for wilderness carry or any where I wanted for that matter, without the hassle of a restricted license or even a permit. If I could find one I would rather have an original Colt SAA or Schofield in 44 Russian but they are even harder to find and usually VERY pricey when they do become available. What are your thoughts on the gun and maybe it's use for legal wilderness carry.

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    I'm not a percussion revolver guy... But, if I was restricted in what I can carry as you are, I'd buy the first one I could find/afford...
    Bart

    Team Old Pharts, Team Marlin Express, Team 30-30, Team 45-70, Team 60, Team Henry, Team Semi-Auto, Marlin League, Team Glenfield, Team 1894

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    Definitely wouldn't be my first choice for woods carry either, but if it's something you won't get hassled over, then I say go for it! You can always sell it down the road if something better comes along!
    If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”
    Sun Tzu, The Art of War

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  5. #4
    Marlin Marksman
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    I did not realize that freedom was restricted that heavily in Canada.
    Marlinjunkie and gunscrewguy like this.

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    I would think that you would be better off with one of the newly made replicas if that would still satisfy the law. It will be built of better steel and you wont be depending on a revolver that has been rode hard and put away wet too many times.

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    What do you want to use it for ? It would be good for plinking around camp, but forget it if you want to carry it for protective purposes.Colt Army models of 1860 are actually hard to find in really good shape. If they are mechanically sound and have at least perhaps 25% to 35% original finish remaining they fetch prices in my neck of the woods around $ 2000.00 Canadian. That's a lot of money to lose in a confiscation by a conservation officer or cop in an inspection in hunting camp. Moreover the conditions in which it would be used would possibly affect it's finish and hence it's value. Are you going to pack a powder flask, nipple pick, nipple wrench, percussion caps, grease to seal the loaded chambers and etc ? Best gun in camp is a beater 12 guage pump shotgun with a shortish barrel loaded with #2 buck. If the Colt is in good shape and you can get it for a reasonable price you can start a collection or swap it out for something you want later. I did that to get a Marlin (old) Model 1895 in .40-65 Winchester. I kept the other Colt for my collection.
    If my wife asks....all guns cost five bucks and ammo is free !!!

  8. #7
    Gun Wizard
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    An original Colt 1860 Army? First things first, get a look at the grips, are there letters in a cartouch (Outlined)? They are military inspection stamps and make it worth a lot more money. Also, genuine percussion Colts are expensive, maybe too much so for carrying round the woods. Take care with condition, the wedge Arbour system for attaching the barrel can weaken with age. Grasp barrel and frame and feel for play. Ideally remove the wedge (Held with a screw) and check the rifling, look for any deep pitting. Check for matching numbers, all on the bottom, frame, barrel and cylinder from memory. Matching numbers make it worth more. Not important if you just want to shoot it but it will command and hold value better if matching.

    Frankly an original Colt Perc Rev, whether a .44 Army or .31 pocket belongs in a collection on display, not in the field being shot. But its your money. A cheap Italian repro would make more sense, keep the original as an investment.
    'Diligentia Vis Celeritas'

    Its not what difficulties life throws at us, but how we face them that defines us....

  9. #8
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    I'm assuming that correct reproductions are banned? In the USA replicas, and even not so close replicas fall under antiques.

    AC

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithywess View Post
    What do you want to use it for ? It would be good for plinking around camp, but forget it if you want to carry it for protective purposes.Colt Army models of 1860 are actually hard to find in really good shape. If they are mechanically sound and have at least perhaps 25% to 35% original finish remaining they fetch prices in my neck of the woods around $ 2000.00 Canadian. That's a lot of money to lose in a confiscation by a conservation officer or cop in an inspection in hunting camp. Moreover the conditions in which it would be used would possibly affect it's finish and hence it's value. Are you going to pack a powder flask, nipple pick, nipple wrench, percussion caps, grease to seal the loaded chambers and etc ? Best gun in camp is a beater 12 guage pump shotgun with a shortish barrel loaded with #2 buck. If the Colt is in good shape and you can get it for a reasonable price you can start a collection or swap it out for something you want later. I did that to get a Marlin (old) Model 1895 in .40-65 Winchester. I kept the other Colt for my collection.
    Smithy knows the Canadian laws so I will talk about the pistol itself. I shot a lot of rounds through my 1860 Army Reproduction and even used on in BP competition. My favorite was a timed event where we shot 4 wood blocks off a plank. The ballistics of an 1860 are not tremendous. A 130 grain ball at about 900 fps with a fully loaded chamber. About like a 38 special. The Colt took a 454 ball as a rule. They were holster pistols and a favorite. These were the pistols that truly "won the West". But I somehow cringe at buying an original for the use you want it. They are not a very powerful pistol for their bulk. As stated you need to carry a flask, capper and ball separate as well as grease. BP needs a lot of maintenance. If you shoot it, you need to clean it. Mine works best with genuine BP. 3f. Swiss is the best. For your use, the 12 ga beater or some other option would be better. A lever 30-30 is about as handy as anything. I cannot improve on Smithys advice.

    DEP

  11. #10
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    Using a valuable antique in such a role is a bad idea for too many reasons to go in to. Don't do it. You will not be well-protected, and you will not have the legal immunity you're thinking that you will have.
    Pisgah
    ------------------
    "He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the LORD require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?" Micah 6:8


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