Model 60 questions
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Thread: Model 60 questions



  1. #1
    Sidewinder
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    Model 60 questions

    I saw a few recent posts on here where guys were refinishing some rifles, and figured heck if they can do it so can I. How hard can it be right? That gave a new meaning to the phrase the internet, 4x4s, and women are nice to have around but will get you into things and places you dont need to be.

    It took about 30 minutes to answer that question. By that point I was in to deep and stubbern to stop.

    Question 1. I tried to reblue all the parts. I used Birchwood Casey cold blue. It came out spotty and splotchy all over the barrell. I had the metal nice and clean. What did I do wrong?

    Question 2. The bluing did not stick to or react to the reciever and trigger guard. Is this because it is possibly a different type of metal? Whats my options spray paint?

    Question 3. If I take the big internal part apart. ( not sure of correct name, It is the one with numerous springs and little easy to loose parts) How difficult is it going to be to reassemble it?

    I bought this weapon a few years ago and it was in rough shape to say the least. If nothing else it has got a good cleaning inside and out, minus the part in question 3.
    When the time to act is here, the time to prepare has past

  2. #2
    Gun Wizard
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    I will give this a shot. There are a lot of little Gremlins that can and often pop up in these processes.

    Question 1. I tried to reblue all the parts. I used Birchwood Casey cold blue. It came out spotty and splotchy all over the barrell. I had the metal nice and clean. What did I do wrong?
    Birchwood Casey will get you to a good result when multiple coats are applied. Major issues are exceptional metal prep and clean surfaces to start with. "spotty" immediately says to me that there are surface contaminants. I clean, rinse and clean again. Always wear gloves (powderless is preferred) and your goal is to not touch the metal if at all godly possible with ANYTHING once ready to apply. I will say to evaluate every thing that came into contact with the barrel before application of the bluing.. Rags, solvent used, how oily it was before starting, anything on the gloves to cause cross contamination?
    Was your work area dirty from previous projects? or where you clean your guns?
    Did you touch anything in the area that might have had anything on it? did you scratch your forehead with your gloves on then touch the barrel? those are the first questions I would ask. Did you use clean, new solvent or from an old can you had in the shop that could have had contamination in it?
    I never use the same rags twice for any application,(wipe, toss, wipe, toss repeat) and if i even think I might have touched anything or if i question myself if i did or didn't, I replace gloves.. lots of times, I find it handy to put on 2 or 3 pairs on top of each other, then shed one off as I go if and when need be.

    Ive seen issues where someone used starched, clean cotton rags, rinsed a part with acetone, and the starch and acetone mix was the culprit of the contamination after hours of testing.

    Question 2. The bluing did not stick to or react to the reciever and trigger guard. Is this because it is possibly a different type of metal? Whats my options spray paint?
    It shouldn't have, its a different metal and Birchwood wont work on it. Its aluminum and you will need to use Aluma hide or similar aluminum blackening agent.. those are also very tricky and the results can be hit or miss.. royal pain for me and my experiences and I most often paint or cerakote aluminum refinishing projects whenever possible. that way it will last forever and look better than factory. I have also had great luck with that ceramic header paint that you bake in the oven.. that's always an option and its 5$ a can at Auto Zone..

    Question 3. If I take the big internal part apart. ( not sure of correct name, It is the one with numerous springs and little easy to loose parts) How difficult is it going to be to reassemble it?
    I assume you're talking about the bolt. Not too difficult to strip, but watch out for all the little parts and document where they go. honestly, unless you are having function issues and parts need to be replaced for safety and or function, I would leave it alone, generally a good shot of brake cleaner then a soak in Hoppes #9 for an hour will get pretty much all the crud out of the little nooks and crannies with a light scrubbing with a toothbrush. Blow out with air, oil and reinstall..


    Hope this helps, Its not that hard to do honestly, but all the details are in the prep work, the actual "job" is the easiest part to be honest.
    Bad preparation kills most jobs before they start..

    Team 60 #186
    Team 30-30 #987
    Team Semi-Auto #34
    Team 45/70 #1801
    Team Wheel Guns #100

  3. #3
    Sidewinder
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    Flats neck.... thanks for the help.
    I wore new latex gloves. The rag was an old towel but was clean prior to this. I tried to make sure the metal was clean too and the solvent was new. I shook it good and opened it right before use. I was not wanting any lint or dist in the bluing. This was why I am wondering what I did wrong.
    I did all this Thursday and left it in the building while the wife and I went out of town. After I posted this I went to the building and saw that the barrell had a nice coat of patina. Now I guess I am back to the drawing board. Sand it back to bare metal and start over.

    The parts I was describing is the ones that sit between the trigger and the bolt. I have pictures on my phone and will try to post it on here

    At least with this I will have something to do for a while lol
    flatsneck likes this.
    When the time to act is here, the time to prepare has past

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  5. #4
    Gun Wizard
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    Ah. ok. something I have found especially with Birchwood casey is it doesn't cover in one coat, and Ive never had good luck letting it sit on it , it really doesn't do anything for it.

    My method is to warm the part up 10-20 degrees above room temp (hair dryer or stick it out in the sun for a little bit)
    then apply a fairly wet coating over the area and keep it wet. Sometimes Ive been known to use a soft bristle brush (toothbrush or soft artist brush) and keep "painting" it all over the surface in long even strokes for a few minutes before I stop and let everything kinda settle on it. you will start to see a good, even distribution over the area with no streaks with that method.

    you'll see everything start to darken up rather quick and become a uniform color. let stand for a few minutes. 5 minutes generally works good for me.
    I try and catch it before it starts to dry out on the surface and become white and chalky.

    I rinse with a clean rag and warm water then immediately apply a second, third, fourth and fifth coat rinsing with clean water between each application,
    all in one session until I get the darkness I am after. After Im happy with the color, I will spray everything down with a soaking coat of wd-40 and let stand over night, the next day, I will vigorously and firmly wipe-burnish everything with a handful of regular paper towels. keep going til all color and residue is gone and paper towels are wiping clean. then, I use rem-oil lightly, let sit overnight again wipe lightly again with paper towels to make sure any and all residue is gotten and call it done. Sometimes I have used rennaisance wax instead of oil. but prefer a good oil soaking as a final finish.

    Cassey wont give a deep color on the first application, or second or third. but it will get deeper and darker the more applications you do. you'll find the spot where you are happy with the color as you go.

    Ive done some that take a color and look great after 3 passes, then the next project might take 9 passes..

    Before you sand back to bare metal. hit the barrel with a scotch brite pad or oil free steel wool and see what the finish looks like and try a second coat like I described above.. warm it up, one wet coat wiped on generously. use a brush to wipe over everything continuously for a few minutes, let stand for 5 minutes, rinse, inspect.. it might start looking more like you were expecting. then, onto coat 3 or more, just remember, its gonna take a few coats.
    Team 60 #186
    Team 30-30 #987
    Team Semi-Auto #34
    Team 45/70 #1801
    Team Wheel Guns #100


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