Hunting in Australia and New Zealand
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  1. #1
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    Hunting in Australia and New Zealand

    G'day
    At the suggestion of McBuck one of our friends in MO who isn't lucky enough to live Down under, lets go with some Hunting stories from ANZMO members, with photos!
    Kangaroo? Feral pigs? Foxes? Goats, feral cat? Crocodile? Rabbits? Water Buffalo? Wild Camel? Feral Donkey? Wild Dogs? Go for it....

    Cheers
    Scott
    McBuck, Hunter30-30, XMAN and 5 others like this.
    Wags 2477

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  2. #2
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    I might not be lucky enough to be living down under, but I am blessed enough to be living the dream on the Blue Ridge! But one of these days, you are going to have a bona-fide north Georgia hill-billy redneck at your campfire!

    Here are a couple of hunting pics from Georgia. And yup...we have some pretty good trout fishing too!!
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    "How dull it is to pause, make an end.
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  3. #3
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    A Brilliant Stalk
    Six am, -7oC, clear skies and off we go. John and I had been given instructions by David Blackman, so off we went. After searching we eventually disturbed a pig that in turn attracted the attention of some Fallow deer. Their alertness gave them away by their movement albeit their ears. After a pain staking time we moved around the side of the hill to get a better view. When we got there no one was home, they were gone, 400m away. They were now 400m at the bottom of a downhill slope with only a couple of dead trees between them and us. After a painstaking on all fours stalk we got within 50m only for them to walk up a trail, through the fence and out of sight. We had about 40-50 rear ends to shoot at. Lunch time. 2pm we head out for the afternoon stalk. We head for the next valley over. Park the car then go straight up. We soon level out and start to walk around the hill. Within 10 minutes we sight a herd of deer across the valley in the direction of where we sighted the herd earlier. We had a great vantage point and were able to make a plan and so we put it into action. This was to backtrack and go down a gully and cross the valley floor and sneak up a gully and follow it around and we should be close to them. One did not account for the small herd of cattle that wanted to play in full view of the deer. They did not trot but came at us in a full gallop. They eventually got bored and we watched the deer herd split as a wedgie bombed them. Some to the floor the rest went up. We move up the gully as planned. We come across and start to stalk them …again. Packs off on all fours ….again. We got into viewing range and ….nothing. Where did they go? John was behind a log and I was behind nothing but grass. Where were they? I though they may have sneaked down the gully we had just come up. I don’t put anything passed them now. As I stood up to check it out so did 40 heads of Fallow deer. They had been sunning themselves in the long grass. 10-15m away. Once more 40 rear ends to shoot at but we did not. Get the packs …again. Deer 2 hunters 0. We sneak around the hill and we see the deer feeding as if nothing had happened. Packs off….again, on all fours …..again. The stage was set late in the afternoon and our last chance was approaching very quickly. After 10-15 minutes the gap was approx 150m. The wind was right and deer had no idea we were there. John chose a small live tree as cover, all I had was an 200mm dead tree. I slowly stood up, john was all set to fire if needed. I got myself in position. Glassing the herd through the scope I picked one out. Boom went the new Marlin 336XLR 30-30 using the new Leverevolution bullets. A few seconds later another round took out another doe. At this stage the deer did not panic as we both did not move and the deer could still not sense any danger. The deer only moved off as we moved to find our deer. Deer 2, Hunters 2. The scores were even. A quick call on the UHF had David and Peter Luhrs on their way to pick us up. Dusk was setting in fast. We dressed them and took them up to the nearest track. We thought that they were taking their time. This proved correct as Peter had three pigs in the back of the Ute when they got to us. A marvellous day, a brilliant couple of stalks and I found a hunting companion.
    wags2477, McBuck, mrguvna and 6 others like this.
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  5. #4
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    Just to add that on this property over four days two years ago we saw an estimated 1000 Fallow deer. As the property borders a National Park and the deer lay down with the cattle and have a huge area to roam. Stalking a large open area at best is pain stakingly slow at times and you have to know your quarry. They roam in herds of 20-40-60, with very alert sentry's and we could turn 360 degrees and see possibly 8 herds in that circle or sometimes only one. That trip I got 4 in four days. Last trip was 1 in the four days.

    The joys of hunting.
    wags2477, McBuck, Sambane and 1 others like this.
    Anything made by or touched by man is bound to foul up sooner or later, more than likely sooner or just out of warranty.

    336 7-30 Waters
    336 XLR 30-30
    308 MXLR 308ME
    338 MX
    375 Marlin
    444SS
    1895 XLR 45-70
    Winchester 150 .22
    Winchester 70 .222
    Baikal 12g
    Lee Enfield 303-25

    Team 30-30 #179
    Team .444 #343
    Team 45/70 #156
    Marlin League #127
    Team Old Pharts #69
    ANZMO #75

  6. #5
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    hey hunter30-30!! You got any pictures of this little safari? I would love to see them. Sound like hunting down under is quite a bit different than hunting here in the states. Especially different than hunting here in the southeaster US. We hunt a lot, and I mean almost 90% of our hunting from a climbing treestand or some type of elevated box stand. I would guess y'all call them "blinds." But post some pics of your hunt...would love to see them!
    wags2477 and moofy07 like this.
    "How dull it is to pause, make an end.
    To rust unburnished, not to shine in use!"
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  7. #6
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    image.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgHere's a couple of photos to get started: a fox whistled up with a 50 cent tin whistle and despatch ex with a 12 guage, with my son after ambushing a mob of feral goats, and a sow taken at about 75m with my old .243.
    Wags 2477

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  8. #7
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    Here's a story my son wrote about his first succesful deer hunt a couple of years ago, he has been comming hunting with me since he was about 6 months old but due to Aus laws couldn't get a licence/permit until he was 12, with him being away at boarding school his hunting oppertunities are limited. On a trip to the same area the previous year we had him in position to take a shot at a reasonable buck but he wasn't confident in making the shot (about 180m) so passed it up.

    Tuesday the 5th of July was the big day, dad and I were booked into a local state forest to try a get my first deer. We packed the ute the night before and 5.30am Tuesday morning I was awake and ready to go. The weather forecast was for rain, snow, and 100kph+ winds so dad decided to sleep in and it was almost 8.00am before we left the house. We made a quick stop at mum and dadís Newsagency for dad to grab a coffee and with them now selling shooting gear in the shop we also picked up some flip up scope covers, a couple of game bags and a gambrel and hoist kit.
    Once we turned onto the road leading to the state forest I was on the lookout for any deer in the paddocks of surrounding properties. 9.45am we arrived at the forest boundary, we had travelled less than 1km along the main access road before three fallow deer ran across the road in front of us. Excited I kept my eyes peeled for any more. About 200m further along we turned onto the track that would take us to dadís usual camping spot and only went a few hundred metres when a buck with a reasonable rack ran through a clearing beside us before dashing into the pines.
    We had trouble finding the turn into our camping spot because it has become overgrown with briars, blackberries, saplings and shrubs. Seems dad must be the only one apart from the brumbies using it and with the rain in the past week they had turn the top couple of inches of soil to mud. We slipped and slid our way along dodging saplings and flattening briars in an attempt to get to camp. A second tree across the track necessitated another detour through a gully bottom dad was concerned about getting bogged in but we eventually made it to camp. The briars and blackberries are slowly invading the camping spot and the brumbies now have a track running right through the middle.
    After setting up camp and getting a fire going we had a bite to eat and set about getting our gear ready to go hunting. We got the rifles out (mums marlin 30/30 for me, dad had his 7mm Rem Mag) and set about doing what we could to weather proof them. This involved putting a bit of electrical tape over the muzzle and fitting the flip up covers to the scopes to keep the rain off. By this stage my shoes were already soaked and I decided to change into my dry pair of shoes before we started hunting (which I would regret later on when we got back to camp and I didnít have any dry shoes to wear).
    It was raining as we headed off, we planned to quarter across the wind then hunt the edge of the pines back towards camp. About 300m from camp dad pointed out a white thing in amongst the briers and blackberries. We moved to get a better view and sat and used the binoculars. They revealed a goat that we have seen a number of times before but has always managed to evade us. After 10min of glassing we knew the goat was bedded in the middle of a mob of about a dozen kangaroos. There were plenty of other roos between them and us but we couldnít see anything else so we decided to stalk and see if I could get a shot at the goat.
    The thickness of the blackberries and briars meant visibility was only about 20m and we needed to take numerous detours to get into a position for a shot. Army
    crawling around the last blackberry I spooked one of the kangaroos less than 10m away and the goat moved off, being quickly swallowed by the cover. Standing up to look for the goat we also spooked eight previously unseen fallow deer that went tearing out cover about 50m to our left and fled up hill. They slowed to walk and stopped a few times offering a shot but with offhand being the only way to get a shot and the range over 200m dad decided not to take one.
    Somewhat dejected we decided to follow the boundary fence along the native scrub and then hunt into the wind back towards camp. We only went a few hundred metres before the rain turned to hail, not normal hail but tiny stuff like frozen rain drops, being limited in the number of days we had to hunt we continued on. Dad was leading the way and I was climbing over the fallen tree when a fallow doe and yearling stepped out of the scrub under 20m away. Needless to say they didnít hang around long enough for me to finish negotiating the fallen tree and line them up for a shot.
    Once we reached the pine we turned around and started hunting back towards camp, we cut through some pine and into the head of a clearing to allow us to hunt the clearing into the wind. Slowly working our way along we saw numerous roos but no deer so about 100m from the end of the clearing we cut across it and through the pine to save negotiating the thick blackberries. This proved to be a mistake because as we stepped out of the pine onto the track a quick look over our shoulders immediately revealed a previously unseen deer among the blackberries. It was downwind of us, quickly picked up our scent and bolted taking 2 other animals with it. We continued with our plan and as we moved out of the pine into the next clearing we were confronted with the ever present roos and the tail end of another deer feeding over a small rise out of sight. Trying to manoeuvre into a position to take a shot at the deer we spooked the roos which in turn spooked the deer. The next couple of clearings didnít produce any more deer and we returned to camp very wet and cold.
    The next morning we woke had breakfast and got the guns ready, with the number of deer we had seen the first day we werenít in a hurry and it was about 8.00am before we left camp. With the wind in our favour we planned to stalk the edge of the pine and small clearings towards where we had seen deer the previous day while driving in. Approaching the first clearing numerous roos were seen before a doe strolled from the pine and quickly disappeared into the bushes. With the difficulty in stalking among the blackberries and briars we decided to let it go and keep on walking hopping to find the buck or does we had seen yesterday. 9 oíclock found us in the area we had seen the deer while driving in the day before. This time round there werenít any about. A bit disappointed we decided to drop lower down the hill and hunt back to camp. The wind was now quartering up the hill from behind us we didnít expect too much success but thought it would be worth a try. About 500m around the hill we were in a position to see most of the flats when I said to dad is that the white goat again. Dad looked quickly and said probably a horse, he looked with the binoculars and said itís a deer and he could see 2 more with it. With the deer about 400m away and the wind in our favour we felt confident. We moved to a clump of rocks and a tree that would give us a little shelter from the wind and rain, removed our daypacks for a rest to watch the deer and plan a stalk.
    We had been watching the deer for about 10min, I was looking at the white doe through the scope when something caught my eye. I looked down, and there were 5 deer among the briars and blackberries about 50m below us. We moved to get a better view but they never presented a shot, with only patches of them visible as they moved among the cover before being total lost from sight. We went back to trying to work out how to get near the mob with the white doe, which had now bedded down. The cover was that heavy, despite another 10min of watching through the binoculars we were unable to locate either of the other 2 deer that we knew were with her. We knew we could get within 50m of her but the cover would mean she would still be out of sight unless we could get within 20m of her and with at least 2 other deer with her not to mention the ever present kangaroos we werenít confident.
    The decision on what to do was made for us when she became agitated and stood before moving off, the other 2 deer materialised from the cover along with another previously unseen animal to bring the total to 4. They headed into a gully and crossed before appearing to settle down slightly and started to graze. Quickly summing up the situation dad decided that we should head to a dam about 200m from them in the direction they were feeding. He thought they would have to go past it to get into the really heavy cover further up the hill and it would be our best chance of ambushing them. We made the dam in about 5min to be confronted with yet more kangaroos. Moving slowly from behind a large blackberry bush I spotted a flash of white among the cover. I drop the ground, the deer were behind some blackberries about 60m away but dad was confident they would feed onto a small clearing the othersider of the dam or come out a track between the blackberries towards us offering a shot either way . I readied myself with a rest over my daypack but found I couldnít get high enough to clear the grass. Dad sat with his knees up in front of him and by sitting the daypack on top of his knees was able to get a reasonably solid rest that let me get above the grass. After what seemed like an hour but was probably only a few minutes one of them grazed into the open. With no mature buck among them we had decided I would take a shot at which ever offer the best opportunity. When it turned towards us I was following it through the scope and with the crosshairs centred on its chest, I squeezed the trigger. At the sound of the shot it dropped instantly. The other deer were obviously confused about what was going on and after a startled jump milled about trying to locate the danger. Dad stood up and moved slightly to get a better line of sight and snapped a shot at the white doe that dropped as if electrocuted. The remaining 2 deer look confused and just stood there. Despite standing only 60m away they didnít bolt and we watched them for a few minutes before I got out my video camera only to discover it wouldnít zoom. When we walked over to look at our downed deer they moved off.
    My deer turned out to be a yearling buck. Both deer had bleed out fairly well so we decided to leave them where they were and walk back to camp to get the ute and dress them out in a better position. As we crested the top of the hill on the way back to camp our mate the goat from the previous day presented us with a perfect shot at around 70m. With 2 deer already on the ground we elected to let it go for another time. Our bush bashing back to pick up the deer was quite eventful, in some spots we were sliding everywhere and one spot we couldnít really steer it was way too slippery and the front wheels were just sliding. We managed to navigate our way through the briers to the deer. With the deer loaded we headed back to camp. What took us 30min to walk ended up taking 1 hour in the 4WD. We got stuck four times before eventually getting back to camp.
    Back at camp we used the gambrel and pulleys to hoist the deer up off a branch and proceeded to dress them out. Before packing up camp and heading off. Another 2 deer were seen on the drive out and we stopped at the entry to the forest to unlock the 4WD hubs and put on some dry cloths before the 1.5hr drive home.
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  9. #8
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    Ok McBuck I will try to find some and learn how to post them. Stalking deer in NZ or OZ means the hunter has to know many things.
    1. Know your Quarry. in that different season means different habits for male and female. Each species are different. I like the red deer which are normally loners and not herd animals like Fallow.
    2. Be at one with nature as when we hunt say in NZ in the rugged mountains (Very dense native forest that can hide a deer only metres away from you and now and again I turn around and will see a deer looking at me.) you need to know how to survive in all weather and those mountains will kill. Use the mountains to your advantage, know the water holes, tracks, Know how to pack lightly. (Used to go in for weeks only with what we carried and carried out back straps and hind quarters)
    3. Here in Australia in Qld it is more open and hunting needs to more planned. We can be seen for miles if one does not use the ground cover effectively. Hence the Fallow may be small animals but by jingos they test out your hunting skills on an open stalk.

    Every part of the world is different and that is what makes this forum so special. We learn from each other and although we may never meet we are kindred spirits.

    Cheers

    Hunter
    wags2477, mrguvna and Sambane like this.
    Anything made by or touched by man is bound to foul up sooner or later, more than likely sooner or just out of warranty.

    336 7-30 Waters
    336 XLR 30-30
    308 MXLR 308ME
    338 MX
    375 Marlin
    444SS
    1895 XLR 45-70
    Winchester 150 .22
    Winchester 70 .222
    Baikal 12g
    Lee Enfield 303-25

    Team 30-30 #179
    Team .444 #343
    Team 45/70 #156
    Marlin League #127
    Team Old Pharts #69
    ANZMO #75

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter30-30 View Post
    Ok McBuck I will try to find some and learn how to post them. Stalking deer in NZ or OZ means the hunter has to know many things.
    1. Know your Quarry. in that different season means different habits for male and female. Each species are different. I like the red deer which are normally loners and not herd animals like Fallow.
    2. Be at one with nature as when we hunt say in NZ in the rugged mountains (Very dense native forest that can hide a deer only metres away from you and now and again I turn around and will see a deer looking at me.) you need to know how to survive in all weather and those mountains will kill. Use the mountains to your advantage, know the water holes, tracks, Know how to pack lightly. (Used to go in for weeks only with what we carried and carried out back straps and hind quarters)
    3. Here in Australia in Qld it is more open and hunting needs to more planned. We can be seen for miles if one does not use the ground cover effectively. Hence the Fallow may be small animals but by jingos they test out your hunting skills on an open stalk.

    Every part of the world is different and that is what makes this forum so special. We learn from each other and although we may never meet we are kindred spirits.

    Cheers

    Hunter
    Most of what you say is not much different here in the states. I don't know if the game overlaps there, but here it it does not overlap as much....except is some western states. the south where I am ( at least in some states) you can hunt whitetail deer, hogs, and bear sometimes on the same hunt...Georgia even has an alligator season early in the season. In the western states; Wyoming, Colorado, Montana...you may see elk, moose, antelope, mule deer, whitetail deer, cougar, bear, wolf, and bear....but you might only have a tag for two or three of the species. Those states also have seasons on mountain goats, or one of the sub species of big horn sheep. Now Alaska....it is more like Africa of the north....there is no telling what you might be able to hunt or see there....for arguments sake, I'll just stick to what I know...the southeastern US, and the Appalachian mtns in particular....here is a black/melanistic coyote I popped a few years ago while still hunting ( stalking) a long piney ridge (evergreens)....sorry bout the buck pic, it was attached...I killed the buck a few days earlier.
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    cowpoke and gunrunner like this.
    "How dull it is to pause, make an end.
    To rust unburnished, not to shine in use!"
    Tennyson

  11. #10
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    There can be a fair overlap of species in some areas of Aus, in the area we hunted in my sons story we have seen fallow, sambar, goat, fox, and rabbit as well as coming across fresh pig sign all on the same day.
    There are also red deer, dingo/feral dogs, and cats around, most of the rivers and streams hold brown and rainbow trout.
    cowpoke likes this.


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