Intro to the 35 Remington Cartridge
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    Intro to the 35 Remington Cartridge

    This is the first of what is planned to be a number of posts, hopefully informative to some, about the 35 Remington cartridge and giving a bit of history and maybe some information that may not be commonly known.

    The cartidge is a bit of an odd duck as a cartridge choice for a Marlin 336.

    A clue to that is its rimless rather than rimmed case shape. Rimmed cases are more commonly associated with traditional lever action rifles, but the 35 was not originally intended to be chambered in a lever action. Rather, Remington introduced it along with a collection of other rimless cartridges in 25, 30, 32 and 35 caliber all with "Remington" following the caliber designation, intended for a rather futuristic looking autoloading rifle introduced in the early years of the last century.

    Of the four cartridges, the 35 is the only one that remains and was the most popular.

    The 35 Remington does not share the same case dimensions as its smaller caliber siblings, in recognition that it needed more case capacity to drive the bullet at the planned velocites at acceptable pressures suitable for the autoloading Model 8 action. Futuristic as it looks, the Model 8 had a feature that is not seen today, which was that the barrel slammed forward and backward into battery when the gun was fired rather than remaining fixed in place. The effect was somewhat analogous to the 1911 pistol's operation. However, the Model 8 was considered a "long recoil" type action based on how the barrel and action moved. The barrel moved forward separately from the breech as the bolt did not drive it back into position.

    The exterior of the rifle was somewhat misleading. What appeared to be a barrel was actually a barrel "jacket" or barrel cover, which allowed the barrel inside to move fore to aft as the rifle accomplished its recoil, extraction, feeding and return to battery function. Due to this slam bang sort of operation, the Model 8s had plenty of accuracy for their intended purpose but probably leave some amount of accuracy on the table as opposed to a rifle that has a fixed barrel. Reported accuracy of the Model 8s is typically in the three inch at 100 yard vicinity.

    As with many firearms designs of the period, the Model 8 was a John Moses Browning creation. Accompanying the new design were many advertisements extolling its virtues, and, for an early autoloading rifle of the period, its power.

    The most famous ad was called "The Right of Way" where a grizzled outdoorsman was depicted as being nearly toe to toe with a large bear, each on the same narrow trail at the edge of a precipice headed in opposite directions. Man and bear were in the way of the other's intended destination. Hopefully the imaginary guy facing the imaginary bear had the most powerful of the quartet of calibers offered in the Model 8, which was the 35 Remington.

    For the imaginary guy's sake, I hope so! This is not to imply the 35 Remington was and is a big mean bear caliber in light of the choice available today, but at that time (1906) the combination of 5 shot autoloading firepower and 35 Remington cartridge was unsurpassed. More powerful rifles did not shoot as quickly, and rifles that shot as quickly were somewhat less powerful, for the most part.

    Googling "The Right of Way Painting Remington" will bring the old ad up. It is worth viewing. I have a copy on my reloading room wall.

    Besides autoloading rifles, Remington has made the 35 Remington in pump and bolt action rifles and the XP 100 pistol. Thompson Center produced it as a standard caliber for the Contender pistol and it is best utilized in 14 inch and longer barrels.

    Marlin decided to add the 35 Remington to its 336 production line about 1950 and eventually offered carbine and rifle variants over the years. It produces it to this day in the 20 inch barrreled option. It may seem strange to put a rimless cartridge in a lever action rifle but the fact that they have done so for many years indicates it is possible for the magazine cutoff to function properly even with a rimmed cartridge.

    The 35 Remington is vastly outsold by the 30-30 in the 336 lineup. The generally lower cost of the 30-30 ammo and its greater availability are undoubtedly factors that account for that. But if you handload, or don't mind stocking up on ammo when it is available the 35 has some level of benefit to those who want something different that offers the ability to derive the worth of a heavy bullet.
    Last edited by 35remington; 04-16-2017 at 08:31 PM.

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    Esteemed Sharpshooter
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    I had a lot of your posts saved on my old computer that crashed. Hope you cover some of your old info. DP
    Last edited by dpe.ahoy; 04-23-2017 at 09:57 PM.
    Texas Shooter and GrumpyBear like this.
    TEAM 444 #187, Team 35 #7, Two Marlin 1894Cs, Remlin 1894C, 1894-44mag, 1966 Texan 30-30. Two Glenfield 36G's & two 30A's 30-30, 30-30 XLR, , five- 35rem. 1951 SC, 1952 SC, 1957, 1975 and 2008, 38-55 CB, M-375, 308 MX, 338MXLR, 444P, 444SS, , XS-7 22-250, XS-7 7mm-08 AI,

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    I will.

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    I have a model 8 in 35 Remington. Cool rifle!!!

    T.S.
    NRA Endowment Member, Texas State Rifle Association Life Member, Firearms Accumulator, Native Texan
    Team 99 #29



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    The long recoil action of the model 8 is still around, albeit without a barrel sleeve. The Browning Auto 5 uses the same action, as did the Remington Model 11,11-48,48 series of shotguns. I think the Model 58 was the same as well.
    alphalimafoxtrot likes this.
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    None of those guns are being produced, so when I say the long recoil action is not commonly seen today, that means it is not in current production. The old guns themselves will soldier on for years to come, but if it does not work like a Benelli autoloader or a gas operated design many if not most new shooters and even many older ones will not be familiar with it.
    dpe.ahoy, Drm50 and GrumpyBear like this.

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    I'm new to the 35rem having just purchased two Marlins in this caliber. I am very much looking forward to this.
    Thanks, John
    dpe.ahoy and GrumpyBear like this.

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    I was hooked on the .35 Remington as a daydreaming kid viewing the back-cover cartridge art of the available cartridges in the early-seventies Marlin catalogues (remember those?) It just looked bad-ass, like the younger brother of the .375 H&H. I knew I would own one some day.

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    Expecting my first Lever to arrive any day... 336 in 35 Remington... made in N Haven.
    Help for a newb, please. Would like a couple of sites / threads / posts regarding reloading this cartridge... on the entry level side.
    This is a comfortable forum... enjoying the reads.

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    I've got a#8, 14 & 141 in 35 at present. I had another 141 in 35 but it now lives in Texas. The 8 I've had since 1962, my first deer
    rifle. I've shot over half my deer with 35s and never had to shot one twice. In fact on my very first deer hunt I got into a little trouble
    with my 8. It was about half way through season and a lot of the party had shot deer. Since I was 12 they planted me on a "good"
    place and I had to sit there all day. Non resident was bucks only and the few deer I did see were does. I had a bad case of Buck Fever
    and Hair Trigger. Then finally a bunch with a 4pt came through and stopped about 50yds from me. I immediately beaded the Buck and
    touched one off. He went down flopping but a doe behind him go the slug right in the guts. I was rattled, the doe was bleating and
    trying to get up. I ran over and shot it in the head to shut it up. I knew my uncles weren't going to be happy with me and figured I
    might be on my last deer hunt. They herd me shoot and showed up about 20 minutes later. It wasn't as bad as I thought I got a big
    sermon on being responsible for where my bullet goes, then got lesson in field dressing both deer. Uncles had a local take the Doe on
    the QT and everybody lived happily ever after, except the doe.
    Never trust a man who rents pigs : Gus, Lonesome Dove


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