Well I Missed! - Page 2
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 31
Like Tree158Likes

Thread: Well I Missed!



  1. #11
    Deadeye
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    579
    Member #
    2972
    Thanked
    692 times
    You most always shoot away from a hard surface, So either pad it more or keep your hand between the rifle and a hard surface is good insurance. Also anyone who has hunted long enough has some confusing misses they can't explain. Check your sights at two hundred and go forth and redeem ego!

  2. #12
    Marlin Fanatic
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Florida, Germany, France
    Posts
    12,392
    Member #
    13314
    Thanked
    20566 times
    Don't beat yourself up over it. Just recheck your zero. It could well have been a flyer, they for sure happen.
    NRA Member
    GOA Member
    VFW Life Member
    AMVETS Life Member
    101st Airborne Division Assoc. Life Member

  3. #13
    Gun Wizard
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    LI NY
    Posts
    3,099
    Member #
    66584
    Thanked
    4388 times
    That's hunting.. sometimes we miss, and the animal gets to live another day. It happens.

    I often practice shooting off hand at the range because that's how I shoot when I'm hunting. I'll practice with & without the sling wraped around my supporting arm on forearm. If I'm near a tree, I may use it to steady my shot.

    I wish you better luck next time.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    MarlinOwners.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #14
    Distinguished Master
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Posts
    6,601
    Member #
    4876
    Thanked
    17187 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheelherk View Post
    First chance at a nice whitetail doe at 230ish yards and I missed! 338MXLR shot lights out at the range. Best explanation, other than just screwed up, I had it rested on a carpeted board, left hand on the stock by my cheek. When I fired the big bore jumped off the rest at least an inch or so. Now I’ve used this hold a thousand times rested at the range and other smaller calibers in the field for long shots with no issues. Is it me, do I need to hold the fore end with my off hand with this gun? Thoughts?
    Any rifle with a two piece stock: Support the forearm with your hand and rest your wrist on something. A very many years ago I read an article that expressed that technique (was a Ruger No. 1 being used for the article) and when I got into Marlin lever guns I tried both methods (a rest, and the hand hold) and the article was right.....the hand hold method improves accuracy and consistency! Now, that is the only way I shoot a two piece stock rifle. Works for me.

  6. #15
    Marlin Marksman
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,710
    Member #
    2768
    Thanked
    1221 times
    Lots of things change when shooting in hunting situations. I personally shoot way more off-hand than any other position. That is how I usually end up shooting at deer, so I practice it a lot.
    Try making a set of shooting sticks, aka Buffalo sticks. I also carry a couple of screw-in bow holders. I screw them into the tree at shooting height, then hang the gun on them. If deer show, I raise the gun on the hook and I can also lean it (rifle) against the tree and use hand pressure for more control and stability..

    That works for me, but each of you might have something better for you.

    And the OP took the time to check his zero at longer distances. So often we hear about guys that zero at 100 but then shoot 200 without ever firing a shot at a target at that distance.
    Even with all of that prep he still missed. It happens and if you have never missed then I am jealous of you. Sometimes you hit unseen brush, sometimes you only have a limited target (neck) but most of the time we rediscover that leisurely bench shooting is far different than hunting shots in the cold and rain or snow. And I don't know about the rest of you, but I still get that adrenalin bump.
    Always better to carry "too much" gun and too many cartridges...
    Marlin 1894SS(2009), Marlin 1894(1975), Winchester 1886 Ultralight rifle(1910), Springfield Trapdoor carbine(1880), Sharps carbine(1863)
    I like big calibers

  7. #16
    Gun Wizard
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    2,184
    Member #
    44583
    Thanked
    4992 times
    Are you sure sure sure you missed? I mean if the rifle kicked up that much - you may have lost the animal in the scope and so didn't see it's reaction...

    Often as not - if the deer instantly jumps or reacts the instant of the shot - you hit it. If it just picks up it's head and looks around wondering what's going on, picks up it's head and stands stock still for a while, or looks up and starts walking off - you probably missed.

    Next... Get back out to the range.... Make sure the gun and ammo is COLD. If you have to - leave the rifle in your truck over night and put the ammo in the freezer ahead of time. Carry the ammo out to the range in a cooler. You want to duplicate HUNTING conditions as closely as you can. This was a HUGE learning experience for me with my reloads - as they chrono'd almost 500fps slower and printed a couple inches lower at 25F than they did at 90F during summer practice. (It turned out to be the primers and now they don't do this with appropriate primers..)

    Next - the FIRST shot at the range is the #1 key thing you have to watch. Hunting is ALL about the first shot - groups with a warm barrel aren't nearly as meaningful....

    Note how often our *normal* range routine is generally to throw out the 1st shot.. Then shoot a couple groups till things settle down and make adjustments from there.... But that's completely the opposite of how we hunt.. You have an HOUR to make the 1st shot and maybe 20-seconds to make the 2nd.. If you fired 5-shots, you either had an epic hunt or the worst ever.....

  8. #17
    Distinguished Master
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Posts
    6,601
    Member #
    4876
    Thanked
    17187 times
    Quote Originally Posted by truckjohn View Post
    Are you sure sure sure you missed? I mean if the rifle kicked up that much - you may have lost the animal in the scope and so didn't see it's reaction...

    Often as not - if the deer instantly jumps or reacts the instant of the shot - you hit it. If it just picks up it's head and looks around wondering what's going on, picks up it's head and stands stock still for a while, or looks up and starts walking off - you probably missed.

    Next... Get back out to the range.... Make sure the gun and ammo is COLD. If you have to - leave the rifle in your truck over night and put the ammo in the freezer ahead of time. Carry the ammo out to the range in a cooler. You want to duplicate HUNTING conditions as closely as you can. This was a HUGE learning experience for me with my reloads - as they chrono'd almost 500fps slower and printed a couple inches lower at 25F than they did at 90F during summer practice. (It turned out to be the primers and now they don't do this with appropriate primers..)

    Next - the FIRST shot at the range is the #1 key thing you have to watch. Hunting is ALL about the first shot - groups with a warm barrel aren't nearly as meaningful....

    Note how often our *normal* range routine is generally to throw out the 1st shot.. Then shoot a couple groups till things settle down and make adjustments from there.... But that's completely the opposite of how we hunt.. You have an HOUR to make the 1st shot and maybe 20-seconds to make the 2nd.. If you fired 5-shots, you either had an epic hunt or the worst ever.....
    I always work up my loads and sight in at the median temperature parameter that I hunt under....around here 40 degrees is about it (our deer season temps can range from 20 to 60 on average). I know hunters that sight in or work up loads when its 90 out and then hunt when its in the 20's. I ran some tests a few years ago and the difference in group size and point of impact can be enough to cause a miss...especially at distance. I also ran some tests concerning temp and load/fps, and I found that to get the same velocity at high temps requires much less powder than at low temps. I have that data somewhere...if anyone is interested I can post it.

  9. #18
    Gun Wizard
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    2,184
    Member #
    44583
    Thanked
    4992 times
    Flat Top - velocity going all over the map with temperature changes off is a classic primer issue/tell tale.

    I had to experiment with primers quite a bit - and finally settled on CCI Magnum or Winchester magnum primers for ALL my HUNTING loads - from 7.62x39 to 30/30 to 30-06.... Velocity variation with 70-degree temperature swings went from 400+ FPS to 20-ish FPS...

    Standard primers are fine for range duty/fun shooting and are often more accurate than magnum primers for any given load at the range - they just produce way too much velocity change when the weather changes a lot vs your test conditions...

  10. #19
    Sidewinder
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    196
    Member #
    34590
    Thanked
    445 times
    I might have given the wrong impression, I am a long time hunter. Having grown up in the south I’ve had a 35 since middle school, a Christmas gift from my dad. Still have it. I actually bought a beater for the woods later to save it. So lots of deer from NC and Indiana over the years. Indiana were the college years. I’ve never owned a large caliber that had this kind of snap! I’m positive I missed, after tracking the deer, prints only, for more than 200 yards. I will practice with the 338 fore end hold before I take another long shot. For now I’ll stick with what I know, 308 Mx and mxlr.
    Wade

    “Aviation is proof that given the will,
    we have the capacity to achieve the impossible!”

  11. #20
    Distinguished Master
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Posts
    6,601
    Member #
    4876
    Thanked
    17187 times
    Quote Originally Posted by truckjohn View Post
    Flat Top - velocity going all over the map with temperature changes off is a classic primer issue/tell tale.

    I had to experiment with primers quite a bit - and finally settled on CCI Magnum or Winchester magnum primers for ALL my HUNTING loads - from 7.62x39 to 30/30 to 30-06.... Velocity variation with 70-degree temperature swings went from 400+ FPS to 20-ish FPS...

    Standard primers are fine for range duty/fun shooting and are often more accurate than magnum primers for any given load at the range - they just produce way too much velocity change when the weather changes a lot vs your test conditions...
    I "preferred" mag primers for hunting, and in the test I did I used mag primers...there was still a good amount of variation with temp change. I do know that the cartridge and powder used make a big difference, and there are some cartridge/powder combinations that can get downright dangerous if a load is worked up in cold weather and shot in hot weather......I have seen that happen. I still prefer working up loads for the temp median that I will be hunting in, so I wont have concerns about loading components or temp swings.

    When I could not get my favored primer (Fed Match Magnum) because Federal decided that reloaders where not a priority a few years back, I switched over to Rem and Win lg rifle, and worked up my loads with those two...no real difference in performance or accuracy at my median hunting temp, so thats what I use now....no problems so far.

    I dont doubt your test results and we all need to work with what works for us.

    Here are the results of my testing: This was done with my SG 444 modified rifle so the load data CAN NOT be used in a OEM 444 Marlin. Because of that I will not mention the powder used, but you can get an idea that temp can make on load/fps/pressures, etc. My goal with this test was to see what powder charges would give me an average of 2160 fps (my accuracy load) at varying temps. Bullet was a 410 grain BTB Safari (designed by Marshall specifically for my modified rifle), Fed Match Mag primers, Rem cases.

    20 degrees = 51.5 grains = 2171 fps.
    40 degrees = 51.4 grains = 2160 fps.
    60 degrees = 50.4 grains = 2164 fps.
    90 degrees = 49.0 grains = 2147 fps.
    100 degrees = 48.5 grains = 2150 fps.

    There was a 4 grain difference from 20 to 100 degrees. The 100 yard load shot at 20 degrees would not be impressive.... and the 20 degree load shot at 100 degrees could be devastating. I learned a long time ago from some very wise competitive shooters that working up loads (especially top end loads) at a temp median is the safest way to obtain accuracy and performance.
    Marlinjunkie and pacificpt like this.
    "Overkill.............is WAY underrated."
    https://www.marlinowners.com/forum/new-sg35-sg444-home/


Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New | Subscribed Threads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •