Might have hurt my bore (1894C)
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  1. #1
    Tenderfoot
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    Might have hurt my bore (1894C)

    Hey gang,

    During the last cleaning of my 1894C, I noticed a blemish in the bore. About 1/3 to 1/2 way down the barrel @ 3 o'clock. Looks like a tiny 'knick' on the land and a bit of 'waviness' if you will, in the groove. I don't know if I (being a newbie) caused it or if it was like that from the factory. I've had the rifle for 6 months, 400 rds or so.

    Being pretty new to guns and shooting, I'm not experienced in the best methods for cleaning a given bore, aside from the basic stuff anyway. I've probably been a tad obsessive-compulsive about it. I wan't to do all I can to keep my guns happy. I've read allot of different recommendations over the last few years and it's hard to know what's best. I'd always run thru a wet patch, bronze brush then dry patch (repeat as necessary).

    I think the blemish may have been caused by a .357 brass jag. I heard they were best for cleaning somewhere. Despite being 2-3mm smaller than an empty .357 casing, the jag was mega-tight to push thru the bore (w/patch of course). It got stuck pretty tight part way thru, so I had to get a bit forceful. Wasn't going to reverse it in the bore. I was also using a 3-piece brass rod which may have bowed and rubbed a joint on the land, I donno.

    The jag made me nervous, and I've only used slotted nylon tips, dewey 1-piece and patches since. They go thru nice and smooth.

    I don't know if this small knick will effect performance, or if it warrants my sending the gun back to Marlin (under warranty) for possible barrel replacement. The blemish area is mid-bore with muzzle/crown and all else looking fine.

    I've heard these levers shoot better after 1000 rnds, and having 400 rnds already thru it, I don't really want to start over.

    I've had the rifle disassembled for a few weeks now, (just lever and bolt). I run a patch of Hoppe's #9 thru it every day or 2, and a dry patch thru before re-wet patching.

    After wet patching, the bore looks perfect. A few days later, the bore either dries of Hoppe's and exposes fouling, or, the fouling is brought out by the No.9. I'm not sure.

    That's kindof irrelevent, but it's something I hadn't seen before as I've always replaced bolt & lever after cleanings.

    I'm also worried about having the bolt/lever out for an extended period. Will this cause undue wear on the hammer spring? Sure as hell don't need that to fail.

    Thanks for your time and wisdom,

    CW

  2. #2
    Site Contributor Contributing Member
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    Might have hurt my bore (1894C)

    This is an area where you will get as many opinions as posters. Shoot your gun. If there is a dramatic difference in its accuracy, or throws more flyers, you probably have a problem. No bore is perfect. They come from the factory full of chatter marks. I have enough guns, that it has become quite obvious to me that imperfections are much more important if the imperection is closer to the muzzle of the gun or throat of the chamber. Middle of the barrel shouldn't matter as much. I had a 357 barrel replaced, and am still not sure why they did it. (It tossed bullets sideways on velocities over 1200 with an unchecked lead bullet.)

    Also, I don't see the need to clean every time I shoot. I clean between switching from jacketed to cast, but seldom other than that unless there is crud building up or the action guns up. I clean the outside, and oil the gun. My gun is also firelapped, which minimizes any fouling. SHooting only cast, it will clean with a couple of patches. Copper fouling can become tedious, and will cake powder around its fouling. (I prefer cast). Many folks will clean every time they shoot. I usually shoot 5 or 6 guns weekly for about 2 to 400 rounds in all. I spend quite a bit of time reloading, so if I cleaned constantly, it might be all that I got done

  3. #3
    Site Sponsor/Site Contributor Gun Wizard
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    Might have hurt my bore (1894C)

    I'm with Dr A and his experiences have been mine. I'm willing to bet you have just now noticed the spot and that it is a manufacturering mark.

    I'd say slow down you cleaning! It seems that you are shooting enough to know what kind of groups your rifle will throw so let it tell you when it needs to be cleaned. When the groups start to spread and it is not because of an external change, give it a cleaning.

    My shooting and reloading is down a bit this year but I still cycle a number of my Marlins every week. I could spend all my time cleaning them. I live in a high humidity environment so I wipe down the exterior of the rifle with a soft rag and Birchwood-Casey's Sheath and then run the same product through the barrel with a BoreSnake. That's it. I schedule each firearm for a complete takedown cleaning once a year, that still is a couple being cleaned each month, but I leave the barrel alone unless it is trying to tell me something different.

    I do have some ugly barrels that deliver some amazing results.

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  5. #4
    Site Contributor - Team Marlin Express Capt'n Contributing Member
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    Might have hurt my bore (1894C)

    Ditto what the guys said. Dont look down the barrel and it wont be a problem. If the gun is shooting good groups dont try and fix it. I might clean my rifles once a year if that. If the accuracy drops off then I will clean them, or if out hunting and they get wet. I have a couple rifles that you can see flaws in the barrel and they shoot just fine, so dont sweat it if the barrel doesnt look perfect. as far as cleaning the rifle. Back when cartridges were corrosive you needed to clean a rifle every time it was shot or you had a mess on your hands. With todays powders and primers that is not a problem. If the acuracy suffers it is time to clean it, otherwise just shoot the day lights out of it.
    IN MEMORY OF PFC JEFFREY ALAN AVERY, 571st MP CO, KILLED IN ACTION 23 APR 07, AGE 19, MUQUDADIYAH, IRAQ.

  6. #5
    Tenderfoot
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    1894 C

    I have a 1894 C 357 Micro, If i shoot lead bullets it leads the barrel terrible and looks like the first post described.

    I wet it good with solvent, let ie soak for a few hours, then scrub it with a brass brush til it comes out.

    Also I use a cable pull rod, and cut a small whole in the patch to thread over the thread of the Jag and pull it through.

    This way you don 't have to take the lever and bolt out.

    After finding this problem, I only use jacketed bullets.

    Hope this helps.

    SHOOT THIS THING
    RA LIFE 50 YRS

  7. #6
    Wrangler
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    Might have hurt my bore (1894C)

    I take a worn out brush, or I will trim a brush down with side cutters. Then I wrap it with 0000 steel wool, until it fits fairly tight within the bore.

    I soak it with borecleaner, then work it back and forth until I feel no hard spots, and feel an even rersistance as I push it through the bore.

    Every rifle I own, has a mirror bright bore. I think the 0000 steel wool may help in polishing the bore a slight amount. The 0000 steel wool sure is a lot easier on the bore, of the firearm, than a brass brush.

    The 0000 steel wool also allows the rifle to have a consistent amount of bore cleaner deposited the full length of the bore.

    Then I finish off with a wet pat, then drypatches until you feel the bore is clean. Finally I run a, fairly loose, oil saturated patch, through the bore and I'm done.

    When it is time to shoot the rifle again, a wet patch, then a dry patch through the bore and I'm read to shoot.

    Bill
    RA life Member.

    Former Marlin Talk member.

    There are just so many things our liberal friends know, that are just not so. Ronald Reagan - 1964


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