Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11


  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    19
    Member #
    2366

    Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring

    I just replaced the hammer springs on my 1894 .44 and my 39 .22lr.

    I took them to the range today and found some reliability issues.

    About 1 out of 20 rounds (CCI Mini Mags) from the 39 failed to fire. The firing pin did impact the round. It appears that it did not hit it hard enough. I regularly use these rounds and have never had this happen before.

    One round (PMC .44 Magnum) from the box of 50 failed to fire. Again, the firing pin impacted the primer, but it didn't fire. I rechambered the round and it did fire.

    Has anyone had this experience before?

    I suppose I will start putting washers behind the spring to tighten it up.

    I don't know how many I will need to add before they shoot reliably. If I have to tighten the spring too much it misses the point of having a weaker hammer spring.

    Herb

  2. #2
    bsn
    bsn is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    67
    Member #
    2090
    Thanked
    1 times

    Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring

    When you install the softer springs you sacrifice reliability.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    19
    Member #
    2366

    Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring

    I didn't think it would be this bad.

    I thought I checked for posts with people complaining about weaker springs, unless I missed them.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    MarlinOwners.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    195
    Member #
    1506

    Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring

    Friend did this modification to his 39A. He defiantly had reliability issues when he went with the lighter wolff spring. He solved this problem by stoning his firing pin. Basically he made it slightly more pointed.

    It took him almost all day to do this. He’d test fire it, take it apart, stone the firing pin, put it back together, test fire again, and repeat. The final product was reliable firing with a softer spring. Be careful not too take off too much otherwise the firing pin will punch a hole in the case. Needless to say that’s not a good thing so just take off a little bit at a time. Not too sure if it was worth all the work he put into but he seems happy with it.

  6. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    96
    Member #
    2484

    Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring

    http://www.evilroyshootingschool.com...ts.shtml#M1894

    Try one of these. Know lots of folks using them with no complaint

  7. #6
    Gunfighter
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Jenks, OK
    Posts
    830
    Member #
    1526
    Thanked
    23 times

    Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring

    I had the same reliability problem with the 1895 replacement spring. It did reduce the trigger pull to about 2.5 pounds.

    Based on the poor reliability, I can't recommend using the wolf spring.

    Corbi

  8. #7
    Site Contributor Contributing Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    2,295
    Member #
    150
    Thanked
    589 times

    Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring

    No big deal. Put an .060 washer on either end of it and the problem goes away.

  9. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    957
    Member #
    390
    Thanked
    1 times

    Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring

    The factory puts in a spring strong enough to work with the roughest gun that can get out of the factory. The slicker the gun, the lighter spring will work. You can use the spring that works in your gun as it is, or you can polish everything in sight. Just for starters, you need to polish the hole through the spring bracket, the hammer strut, and the inside of the spring. I'd also burnish everything I polished with powdered moly d. I'd also pull the bolt and clean both firing pin halves and the channels in which they rise. Might polish them, too, but would certainly get all the grease out and lube with moly. Take a close look at the hamner, too, wear marks along the sides indicate friction against the frame. Inside of the frame may need to be polished or the hammer may need to be shimmed to ride in the center. Might as well polish the pivot hole and the bolt in which it rides, too. The inside of the slot for the hammer strut often needs polishing top.

    This is a lot of work, but in makes a serious difference in reliability and the strength of the spring needed.

  10. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    19
    Member #
    2366

    Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring

    Everyone, thanks for the input.

    This powdered moly sound interesting.

    What kind of moly do you use.

    It sound like you use no grease or oil at all.

    Is this true? I assume it is working well.

    Do you use it inside the barrel?

    I have also read that some people use both moly and oil. The rational is that some of teh gaps and tolerances are meant to have a liquid (oil) inside them.

    Also, what would you polish it with? I'm thinking about 2000 grit sandpaper.

    I will also experiment with adding washers behind the spring.

  11. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    957
    Member #
    390
    Thanked
    1 times

    Problems with Wolff weakened hammer spring

    I got about a lifetime's supply of powdered moly from Lyman. It was intended for home molying bullets, but I don't use it for that. I don't usually use grease or oil because I have seen way too many failures from decades of buildup. That's avoidable if one has the discipline to detail strip every gun once a year, strip off the old stuff and reapply fresh, but I find it easier to just use dry lube. I also had a hunting buddy have a failure to fire at a crucial moment because the zero degree temperature had stiffened the grease in his bolt. Rifle worked fine when the temp got up to 40 degrees.

    600 grit oiled is what I do much of my polishing with. A set of hard Arkansas gunsmith slips is very useful, but expensive. Brownell's sold and maybe still sells "Flexible Files", strips of plastic imbedded with abrasive that are much less expensive and can be cut to fit into odd places. There is often a need for more than mere polishing. When you have visible tool marks, you need to be a bit more agressive to remove or reduce them before you polish.

    The washer trick is a good one. It costs nothing to try, and slightly increases the strength of the spring by preloading it.


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New | Subscribed Threads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Search tags for this page

adding washers to marlin hammer spring

,

dry moly lube on hammer spring

,

marlin washer wolf hammer spring

,

wolf 39a hammer spring

,

wolff replacement springs to reduce the trigger and hammer pull.

,

wolff springs marlin 1894

,

wolff springs marlin stronger

,

wolffe hammer spring marlin

Click on a term to search for related topics.