+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5
Like Tree2Likes
  • 2 Post By 336ER

Thread: Measuring eye relief / info added



  1. #1
    Cowpoke
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,586
    Member #
    14869
    Thanked
    1770 times

    Measuring eye relief / info added

    Additional scope info at the bottom

    There has been several posts/comments lately on "how much" eye relief one scope or another might have. When it comes to good optics, I look at eye relief as 2nd (at least for me) right after overall glass/scope quality. It's more important to me than the exact magnification range, in most cases. I recently was told by a friend a way to measure very accurately the eye relief of any scope. This method can be very handy when we are looking at more than one scope as a choice to mount on a particular rifle, which we feel, do to recoil, needs "X" amount of relief as a minimum.

    He had found this method in an excellent book on optics he'd had for years. Scopes can be checked while on or off a rifle and this method will give you a definitive answer and actual measurement of true eye relief within 1/8" or less. On a variable power scope, it's not unusual for the eye relief to change somewhat (over 1") throughout the power range and we have already seen some conflicting numbers on the same scope here as one member quotes one source (using the lowest) while another member quotes another (using the highest), both being correct.

    On variable power scope I like to set the scope's eye relief at the lowest setting or very near so when setting up the ring configuration and scope placement. My reasoning is that critical eye relief is most important for close-range (fast action?) shooting, perhaps at an animal running away or even charging . Our rifles will normally be set at a low power when anticipating such an occurrence and we will have no time to reposition our head/eye placement at such a time. And, when we have the time or need of higher magnification, we should have time to re-set our eye relief while we take careful aim at a more distant target.

    Here's the method:
    Items needed are:
    the scope :P
    small flashlight
    ruler or stiff tape measure
    small piece of paper (3X5 card)

    Lay the scope on a flat surface (mounted or not), take the small flashlight and place it against the objective lens, facing into the scope. Turn the light on. Take the ruler (tape measure) and place the end against the ocular bell edge straight outwards from there. Now, take the paper (card) and move in/out until the light beam from the flashlight is in perfect focus. You will be able to easily see a difference of focus with as little as 1/16th to 1/8th inch of movement. When the light beam is in perfect focus, that is the true eye relief of that scope at that power setting and then, simply look at that corresponding measurement.

    This is a great way to compare scopes wanted/needed for odd ring configurations or for hard recoiling rifles (most important!).

    Using this method, the following results were found on a VXI 2-7x33 SG: @2X: 4.25", @4X: 3.75", and @7X: 3.5"

    Weaver 4X SG scope: 4.125"

    Again these numbers are taken from the edge of the ocular bell, which is what smacks you, should the relief not be enuff! , so the numbers could be slightly off from factory claims that might use a measurement from the ocular lens (less helpful, IMO).

    Some additional new information that might be helpful:

    Weaver V3 1-3x20 (one of my favorite scopes for a lever rifle) eye relief at 1X = 5" , eye relief at 2X = 3 3/8", and eye relief at 3X = 3".

    Nikon Monarch SG 1.5-4.5x20, eye relief at 1.5X = 4", eye relief at 2.5X = 3 3/8" and eye relief at 4.5X = 2 3/4" (careful there!)

    Nikon Monarch Africa Series 1-4x20, (German #4 reticle) eye relief at 1X = 4.5", eye relief at 2.5X = 3" and eye relief at 4X = 3".

    Leupold European series 30mm 1.25-4x20 (German #4 reticle and one of my favorite scopes mounted on a .450M) eye relief at 1.25X = 4 3/8", eye relief at 2.5X = 3 3/4" and eye relief at 4X = 3.5"

    Leupold VXI SG 1-4x20,(HD reticle and mounted on my 1895) eye relief at 1X = 4 1/4", eye relief at 2.5X = 3 3/4", and eye relief at 4X = 3.5"

    Leupold Vari-XII 1-4x20, eye relief at 1X = 4 1/4", eye relief at 2.5X = 3 3/4" and eye relief at 4X = 3.5"

    Leupold European series 30mm 2-7x33 (German #4 reticle and an outstanding all-around scope, IMO) eye relief at 2X = 4", eye relief at 4X = 3.5" and eye relief at 7X = 3 1/4"

    caveman and Oberhaz like this.

  2. #2
    Site Contributor Gun Wizard
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    20 mi. NW of Ft. Worth
    Posts
    2,483
    Member #
    13107
    Thanked
    515 times

    Re: Measuring eye relief

    Thanks 336ER. You have done well to describe how to correctly arrive at a scopes eye relief. Fom
    Rom 5:8 But God commendeth his love toward us, in that,while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.

    TEXAS MEMBERS PLEASE JOIN
    http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/gr...ergunners.html
    Team 35 # 125
    Team 45-70 # 30
    Team Marlin Express member
    Team 450 Marlin # 73
    Team Fo-Foty-fo # Fo-Foty-one

  3. #3
    Tinhorn
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    54
    Member #
    8407

    Re: Measuring eye relief

    That is good. Thank you

  4. #4
    Cowpoke
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    West of Chicago
    Posts
    353
    Member #
    10537
    Thanked
    6 times

    Re: Measuring eye relief / info added

    Leupold rifle scopes have always been excellent on plenty of "eye-relief" amoung other things that makes them great to own.........An excellent track record bare none!

  5. #5
    Gun Wizard
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    On the Shawangunk Ridge NY
    Posts
    2,293
    Member #
    8460
    Thanked
    1885 times

    Re: Measuring eye relief / info added

    Quote Originally Posted by 336ER
    Additional scope info at the bottom

    There has been several posts/comments lately on "how much" eye relief one scope or another might have. When it comes to good optics, I look at eye relief as 2nd (at least for me) right after overall glass/scope quality. It's more important to me than the exact magnification range, in most cases. I recently was told by a friend a way to measure very accurately the eye relief of any scope. This method can be very handy when we are looking at more than one scope as a choice to mount on a particular rifle, which we feel, do to recoil, needs "X" amount of relief as a minimum.

    He had found this method in an excellent book on optics he'd had for years. Scopes can be checked while on or off a rifle and this method will give you a definitive answer and actual measurement of true eye relief within 1/8" or less. On a variable power scope, it's not unusual for the eye relief to change somewhat (over 1") throughout the power range and we have already seen some conflicting numbers on the same scope here as one member quotes one source (using the lowest) while another member quotes another (using the highest), both being correct.

    On variable power scope I like to set the scope's eye relief at the lowest setting or very near so when setting up the ring configuration and scope placement. My reasoning is that critical eye relief is most important for close-range (fast action?) shooting, perhaps at an animal running away or even charging . Our rifles will normally be set at a low power when anticipating such an occurrence and we will have no time to reposition our head/eye placement at such a time. And, when we have the time or need of higher magnification, we should have time to re-set our eye relief while we take careful aim at a more distant target.

    Here's the method:
    Items needed are:
    the scope :P
    small flashlight
    ruler or stiff tape measure
    small piece of paper (3X5 card)

    Lay the scope on a flat surface (mounted or not), take the small flashlight and place it against the objective lens, facing into the scope. Turn the light on. Take the ruler (tape measure) and place the end against the ocular bell edge straight outwards from there. Now, take the paper (card) and move in/out until the light beam from the flashlight is in perfect focus. You will be able to easily see a difference of focus with as little as 1/16th to 1/8th inch of movement. When the light beam is in perfect focus, that is the true eye relief of that scope at that power setting and then, simply look at that corresponding measurement.

    This is a great way to compare scopes wanted/needed for odd ring configurations or for hard recoiling rifles (most important!).

    Using this method, the following results were found on a VXI 2-7x33 SG: @2X: 4.25", @4X: 3.75", and @7X: 3.5"

    Weaver 4X SG scope: 4.125"

    Again these numbers are taken from the edge of the ocular bell, which is what smacks you, should the relief not be enuff! , so the numbers could be slightly off from factory claims that might use a measurement from the ocular lens (less helpful, IMO).

    Some additional new information that might be helpful:

    Weaver V3 1-3x20 (one of my favorite scopes for a lever rifle) eye relief at 1X = 5" , eye relief at 2X = 3 3/8", and eye relief at 3X = 3".

    Nikon Monarch SG 1.5-4.5x20, eye relief at 1.5X = 4", eye relief at 2.5X = 3 3/8" and eye relief at 4.5X = 2 3/4" (careful there!)

    Nikon Monarch Africa Series 1-4x20, (German #4 reticle) eye relief at 1X = 4.5", eye relief at 2.5X = 3" and eye relief at 4X = 3".

    Leupold European series 30mm 1.25-4x20 (German #4 reticle and one of my favorite scopes mounted on a .450M) eye relief at 1.25X = 4 3/8", eye relief at 2.5X = 3 3/4" and eye relief at 4X = 3.5"

    Leupold VXI SG 1-4x20,(HD reticle and mounted on my 1895) eye relief at 1X = 4 1/4", eye relief at 2.5X = 3 3/4", and eye relief at 4X = 3.5"

    Leupold Vari-XII 1-4x20, eye relief at 1X = 4 1/4", eye relief at 2.5X = 3 3/4" and eye relief at 4X = 3.5"

    Leupold European series 30mm 2-7x33 (German #4 reticle and an outstanding all-around scope, IMO) eye relief at 2X = 4", eye relief at 4X = 3.5" and eye relief at 7X = 3 1/4"

    Thanks for this info! Just ordered a Weaver V3 1-3 for my Marlin 1894SS.
    Team 1894 #156
    Team 30-30 #845
    Team 22 Magnum #051


Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New | Subscribed Threads

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Search tags for this page

adjusting a rifle scope eye relief
,
determining scope eye relief
,
how to adjust eye relief on a rifle scope
,
how to adjust the eye relief on a rifle scope
,

how to determine eye relief on a rifle scope

,
how to determine scope eye relief
,

how to measure eye relief

,

how to measure eye relief on a scope

,

how to measure scope eye relief

,
how to set eye relief on a rifle scope
,
how to set eye relief on rifle scope
,
measuring eye relief
,
setting eye relief for scopes
Click on a term to search for related topics.