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  1. #1
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    Winchester Model 25 shotgun

    So , my son in law likes what I have done with a few guns of late. He decided to ask if I would help/instruct him redoing an older winnie model 25 made in 1954. Of course I said OK, and he brings it over on Father's Day to ask what I think.

    What I think is ........ "OMG your dad gave you this"? Are you crazy? Is he crazy?

    Guys this thing is worse than some/most of the Katrina victims I have given TLC to. Rusted up, nasty, I mean nasty with gunk and grime and so much dirt that you could probably grow Creole tomatoes in it

    Tried to take it down and wound up putting some Kroil in the buttstock hole and also from receiver end to try and loosen the screw that holds it to receiver. Soaked it in Kroil for two days and wound up cracking the stock clean in two when attempting to break that screw loose!

    Before I proceed any further with this rehab, do any of you know if the buttstock from a Model 12 will fit this model 25? I am leaning towards buying one for him seeing as I cracked the dang thing. Just don't want to spend a ton of money on it.

    Man, it is really sad to see how little some folks care about their firearms.

    He also brought me a JC higgins 1954 model 12 gauge auto. I haven't touched it yet I'm kinda afraid what I am going to find as it looks like it's in the same basic shape as the Winnie.

    Thanks in advance for any help ya'll could give me.
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  2. #2
    RGR
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    Lots of various M12 parts will fit the 25. It was a "poor mans" M12, lacking the increased production costs of the takedown.

    Sounds to me like you may have had the screwdriver between the head of the screw, and the stock but I guess it matters little now. In any case a 12 stock will drop right on. Several places make reproductions, or check gun shows. old stocks are no longer given away though at the shows. Its a shame when murphy drops by, on a gun thats near a total loss already. But I have been there, done that more than once.
    The USA in 2014 ...Where we keep the deathly ill elderly alive on a machine, even if they want too pass, and yet abort a million unborn babies a year, that have no vote in the matter.


    Its interesting that the media calls conservative protestors, "militia" and "domestic terrorists" while world wide and in the states liberal protestors are always called "students".

  3. #3
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    RGR,

    Man I really appreciate you responding. I have learned more this week about model 25's than I ever wanted to know and thought the 12 stock would fit right on it.

    I am sure that I did NOT have the screwdriver wedged against the side of the screw. The take down bolt through the stock was basically fused to the insert that goes into the receiver. After I cracked the stock off, I had to soak just that piece in kroild for several hours before I could get it loose.

    Not sure what I am gonna do with this, but I have it all apart and will ask SIL what he wants to do.

    Again, I really appreciate you responding. I will now begin a search for a stock on the cheap!
    Team 30-30 #616
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  4. #4
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    Stocks CAN be glued together, if all the pieces are there, assuming the bits aren't totally oil-soaked. Shame what folks use for barn/pickup/boat/corn picker guns. There were fewer model 25s made than 12s, so it'd have had some collector value if it were in much better condition. The Sears auto is probably a High Standard Supermatic, one of the first commercially successful gas semi-auto shotguns. Numrich/Gun Parts will have what's available for either gun. Good luck!

    Stan S.

  5. #5
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    I was going to tell you that the Model 25 was called the Poor Mans Model 12 but RGR beat me to it. I knew quite a few people that liked them. A older man I used to hunt with was so enamored with the Model 25 that he bought both his sons a 25 and they probably still shoot them. As far as the stock goes it can be glued back. I gave my boy a model 12 the other day with a busted stock, duck call on the end of the barrel and missing a few parts. He took it to a Pawn shop in Carthage, TX and the owner has a lot of parts for Model 12's. The Pawn shop owner cut the barrel to 20 inches, replaced a couple of parts and charged him 40 bucks. My boy did the stock and it looks and functions like a new gun.

  6. #6
    Deadeye
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    I always chuckle when I hear remarks about the Model 25 being the "Poor Man's" Model 12. In reality, it was designed to be more of a light weight alternative, since many people complained about the weight the take-down feature and heavy vent rib added to the M12. The fact that it dropped the price substantially, just made it more affordable.
    If you ever run across one of the "Featherweight" Model 12s from the short production run in the mid-'70s, take a close look at it. It's not a Model 12; it's a Model 25 with the wrong number stamped on it.

    ---
    Depending on which direction the stock cracked, it should be salvageable.

    Brownell's threaded brass rod is meant for just this purpose.

    This 1952 Model 25 was found in the bottom of an abandoned duck boat in 1963. In addition to being "fuzzy" and pitted with rust; the stock was split badly, and had been wrapped with copper wire that was then pounded flat; and the magazine follower was crushed. It spent 6 years as a "don't do this" display, on the wall of a local gun shop, with my grandfather constantly offering the owner $25 for it. The owner always refused, saying it was a good teaching tool and conversation piece, and that it was worth at least $75 in parts.

    But... the shop finally gave in. My grandfather paid $30 for it, cleaned it up, replaced the butt stock, refinished the fore stock, built a new follower out of brass scrap, and gave it to my father in 1971.

    That is still the original finish. It was never reblued. It has a bit of an antique patina on the barrel and magazine tube, that doesn't show in the photos; but it's in great condition for its age, history, and the amount it has been used.


    The stock you see in the photos is a re-worked Herters stock, designed for a Model 12 (they're a direct fit). However.... that stock split, too. In 1989, my father had a primer fall out of a shot shell, and get lodged behind the bolt, inside the receiver. When the shell failed to fire, he racked the slide to eject the shell, and the primer detonated. It split the stock right down the middle, and blew up the forward 4" on the left side of the grip. While my father received medical attention for large splinters and a piece of the primer lodged in his left arm, we very careful searched the area and found the remaining pieces of wood that had blown off.

    To repair it, my grandfather used Brownell's threaded brass rod and epoxy, and carefully fitted the shrapnel pieces back together with some small pins for reinforcement. The end product was a stock that shows absolutely no indication of having been damaged, except for a small piece on the top, left side of the grip that had a small gap on one edge.

    The repair seam is completely invisible.
    (Note the discolored trigger guard/fire control group. It was one of the worst victims of the rust, but still came out with more of a brown-blued look, than a rusty look.)


    You can see the outline of the ill-fitting chip in the photo below; but that's it.


    Eventually, the shotgun found itself in my gun safe. It is much happier now, since I use it regularly. After it blew up, my father never trusted it again.
    I love it. I regularly shoot Remingtons, Brownings, and other Winchesters; but this 25 just has SOUL!
    Did I mention the serial number is 55,000?
    I'm looking for another 25 with a modified choke barrel. One of these days, I'll find one....


    I'm not accusing you of being inept, but it is REALLY easy to miss the slot in the screw for the butt stock. I've pulled this stock 3 times. Each time, it took me nearly 5 minutes to be sure I got the screwdriver in the slot. (And even then... I was wrong a few times.)
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #7
    RGR
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    the FW model 12 has several differences than the 25, but yes, they are similar. Some of the FW even had the fiberglass wrapped barrels if memory serves, Any M12 made after 64 is a Y series gun, and few collectors put them into the same interest as the pre 64 guns.

    Most of the 25 have the dog leg forearm iron, while the 12 typically had the straight stronger one piece forged action arm. I cant recall the exact reason, but some of the doglegs one cracked there at the dog leg. Or maybe they were two piece and the welds broke at the rear ring, I dont recall the exact reason. The FW12 never had the dog leg iron though, I dont believe either did any of the 12s.

    They only made them a very few years again, going by memory, from the early 50s to the mid to late 50s. No trap nor skeet versions I dont believe, no custom features of any kind. And only in 12 ga. The polish and bluing was not quite as well done, as on the 12s. Of course at that time, even the 12s were coming out a little less perfect than in the good old days before the war.

    Even though few were made, I have observed little collector interest in them, though they are a very fine gun, far and above the traditional quality of any current made pump gun that I am aware of.
    The USA in 2014 ...Where we keep the deathly ill elderly alive on a machine, even if they want too pass, and yet abort a million unborn babies a year, that have no vote in the matter.


    Its interesting that the media calls conservative protestors, "militia" and "domestic terrorists" while world wide and in the states liberal protestors are always called "students".


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