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  1. #1
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    Boiled linseed oil

    Guys I know this is discussed on here somewhere but I searched and could not find it. Just a couple questions:When using BLO on a stock, how many coats? how long between coats? and how long does it usually take the final coat to dry? Thanks in advance!!!
    "Fast is good but accurate is final"...Wyatt Earp

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  2. #2
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    Re: Boiled linseed oil

    You can add as many as you like. Boiled linseed oil does not fill the grain, but it does seal it. It will shed water but the open pores that aren't filled can still accept dirt and grime. Usually wait 24 hours inbetween coats, but don't let it fool you; once you rub in a coat its dry to the touch after taking all the excess off... letting it cure over night or longer is the trick. If too many coats are added it will bleed in the sun and you will def know if you screwed up, and its always a good idea to wait a good while before you take it out in the sun anyways. Boiled linseed oil does not get glossy unless you sand up to 1200 grit and get a real soft almost mirror finish type of wood... and even then it wont be glossy like a fresh coat of tru-oil, gloss poly, or gloss epoxy. Just take the bottle, put your hand over the top, turn it over and get some on your palm and then rub it in. Rub for about 5 minutes on each side thoroughly, wash your hands or wipe them off then go rub it for another 5 or so, then wipe the excess off with a soft lint free type of cloth.


    If you want a glossy finish and something that will fill the grain with enough coats, use true tung oil although its kind of thick and can be messy. You can also try minwax tung oil finish which is tung oil with different chemicals added in and it dries faster, and with enough coats gets glossy. Most of this stuff is just about how many coats you apply but boiled linseed oil is the easiest finish to apply.

    EDIT: Oh yeah one more note. If you're going to stain, don't use a minwax stain. Minwax stains are oil based and even when you wipe the excess off and let the stock or wood dry thorougly, when you go to rub on a coat of blo it will take a lot of the stain off and lighten the stock up not to mention it will be on your hands it can ruin it... use a rit dye stain.
    Formerly 186 Tmanbuckhunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by papajohn View Post
    I hate living in interesting times.

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    Re: Boiled linseed oil

    Just take the bottle, put your hand over the top, turn it over and get some on your palm and then rub it in. Rub for about 5 minutes on each side thoroughly, wash your hands or wipe them off then go rub it for another 5 or so, then wipe the excess off with a soft lint free type of cloth.


    When I was a kid, my mother told me NEVER to do this or I would go blind! No wonder my glasses are so thick!
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  4. #4
    Deadeye
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    Re: Boiled linseed oil

    Quote Originally Posted by 186 Tmanbuckhunter
    You can add as many as you like. Boiled linseed oil does not fill the grain, but it does seal it. It will shed water but the open pores that aren't filled can still accept dirt and grime. Usually wait 24 hours inbetween coats, but don't let it fool you; once you rub in a coat its dry to the touch after taking all the excess off... letting it cure over night or longer is the trick. If too many coats are added it will bleed in the sun and you will def know if you screwed up, and its always a good idea to wait a good while before you take it out in the sun anyways. Boiled linseed oil does not get glossy unless you sand up to 1200 grit and get a real soft almost mirror finish type of wood... and even then it wont be glossy like a fresh coat of tru-oil, gloss poly, or gloss epoxy. Just take the bottle, put your hand over the top, turn it over and get some on your palm and then rub it in. Rub for about 5 minutes on each side thoroughly, wash your hands or wipe them off then go rub it for another 5 or so, then wipe the excess off with a soft lint free type of cloth.


    If you want a glossy finish and something that will fill the grain with enough coats, use true tung oil although its kind of thick and can be messy. You can also try minwax tung oil finish which is tung oil with different chemicals added in and it dries faster, and with enough coats gets glossy. Most of this stuff is just about how many coats you apply but boiled linseed oil is the easiest finish to apply.

    EDIT: Oh yeah one more note. If you're going to stain, don't use a minwax stain. Minwax stains are oil based and even when you wipe the excess off and let the stock or wood dry thorougly, when you go to rub on a coat of blo it will take a lot of the stain off and lighten the stock up not to mention it will be on your hands it can ruin it... use a rit dye stain.
    I you are not 100% committed to BLO, I like tung oil a little better (does a better job of sealing against moisture). Recently refinished the stock on my Garand using tung. To reduce the thickness and speed the drying I made up a solution of 50% tung and 50% citrus solvent.

    Applied 2 coats and once all dried I applied a couple coats of Howards feed-n-wax. Came out real nice.

  5. #5
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    Re: Boiled linseed oil

    Tman, you were right about the minwax stain. Before I posted this question I had already applied minwax red mohogony and 1 coat of BLO. It took some of the stain off and made it lighter. When I put the second coat on today it didn't take anymore off so I think it's going to be OK. Oh well I'll know next time. I really like the flat looking finish of the BLO. I think it's going to turn out good.
    "Fast is good but accurate is final"...Wyatt Earp

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  6. #6
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    Re: Boiled linseed oil

    Quote Originally Posted by cody77
    Tman, you were right about the minwax stain. Before I posted this question I had already applied minwax red mohogony and 1 coat of BLO. It took some of the stain off and made it lighter. When I put the second coat on today it didn't take anymore off so I think it's going to be OK. Oh well I'll know next time. I really like the flat looking finish of the BLO. I think it's going to turn out good.
    Give it about 10 coats, and then 1 coat every month or so depending on how much use it will get, and she will be a beauty!
    Formerly 186 Tmanbuckhunter
    - Travis
    Single action revolvers, Marlin and Winchester leverguns, and Mosin Nagants.

    Team 30-30 #158
    Team 1894 #61
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    Team Mauser Co-Captain

    America was founded by tough hell raisers, rugged American citizens who evaded taxes, spoke strongly against tyranny, grew tobacco, brewed beer and moonshine, and smuggled weapons; it will be saved only by those who do the same today.

    Quote Originally Posted by papajohn View Post
    I hate living in interesting times.

  7. #7
    Deadeye
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    Re: Boiled linseed oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Rainier42
    Quote Originally Posted by 186 Tmanbuckhunter
    You can add as many as you like. Boiled linseed oil does not fill the grain, but it does seal it. It will shed water but the open pores that aren't filled can still accept dirt and grime. Usually wait 24 hours inbetween coats, but don't let it fool you; once you rub in a coat its dry to the touch after taking all the excess off... letting it cure over night or longer is the trick. If too many coats are added it will bleed in the sun and you will def know if you screwed up, and its always a good idea to wait a good while before you take it out in the sun anyways. Boiled linseed oil does not get glossy unless you sand up to 1200 grit and get a real soft almost mirror finish type of wood... and even then it wont be glossy like a fresh coat of tru-oil, gloss poly, or gloss epoxy. Just take the bottle, put your hand over the top, turn it over and get some on your palm and then rub it in. Rub for about 5 minutes on each side thoroughly, wash your hands or wipe them off then go rub it for another 5 or so, then wipe the excess off with a soft lint free type of cloth.


    If you want a glossy finish and something that will fill the grain with enough coats, use true tung oil although its kind of thick and can be messy. You can also try minwax tung oil finish which is tung oil with different chemicals added in and it dries faster, and with enough coats gets glossy. Most of this stuff is just about how many coats you apply but boiled linseed oil is the easiest finish to apply.

    EDIT: Oh yeah one more note. If you're going to stain, don't use a minwax stain. Minwax stains are oil based and even when you wipe the excess off and let the stock or wood dry thorougly, when you go to rub on a coat of blo it will take a lot of the stain off and lighten the stock up not to mention it will be on your hands it can ruin it... use a rit dye stain.
    I you are not 100% committed to BLO, I like tung oil a little better (does a better job of sealing against moisture). Recently refinished the stock on my Garand using tung. To reduce the thickness and speed the drying I made up a solution of 50% tung and 50% citrus solvent.

    Applied 2 coats and once all dried I applied a couple coats of Howards feed-n-wax. Came out real nice.
    +1 on tung oil. Use extra fine steel wool lightly between 7 coats. It's lasted 30 years on a heavily used shotgun without touching up. Still looks like new.
    Ignorance - Not knowing better
    Stupidity - Knowing better, but doing it anyway

  8. #8
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    Re: Boiled linseed oil

    BLO, once per day for a week, then once a week for a month, then once a month for a year, then once every year forever.

    That's one reason why I use tung oil.
    [tt]Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats.[/tt]

  9. #9
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    Re: Boiled linseed oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Rainier42
    Quote Originally Posted by 186 Tmanbuckhunter
    You can add as many as you like. Boiled linseed oil does not fill the grain, but it does seal it. It will shed water but the open pores that aren't filled can still accept dirt and grime. Usually wait 24 hours inbetween coats, but don't let it fool you; once you rub in a coat its dry to the touch after taking all the excess off... letting it cure over night or longer is the trick. If too many coats are added it will bleed in the sun and you will def know if you screwed up, and its always a good idea to wait a good while before you take it out in the sun anyways. Boiled linseed oil does not get glossy unless you sand up to 1200 grit and get a real soft almost mirror finish type of wood... and even then it wont be glossy like a fresh coat of tru-oil, gloss poly, or gloss epoxy. Just take the bottle, put your hand over the top, turn it over and get some on your palm and then rub it in. Rub for about 5 minutes on each side thoroughly, wash your hands or wipe them off then go rub it for another 5 or so, then wipe the excess off with a soft lint free type of cloth.




    If you want a glossy finish and something that will fill the grain with enough coats, use true tung oil although its kind of thick and can be messy. You can also try minwax tung oil finish which is tung oil with different chemicals added in and it dries faster, and with enough coats gets glossy. Most of this stuff is just about how many coats you apply but boiled linseed oil is the easiest finish to apply.

    EDIT: Oh yeah one more note. If you're going to stain, don't use a minwax stain. Minwax stains are oil based and even when you wipe the excess off and let the stock or wood dry thorougly, when you go to rub on a coat of blo it will take a lot of the stain off and lighten the stock up not to mention it will be on your hands it can ruin it... use a rit dye stain.
    I you are not 100% committed to BLO, I like tung oil a little better (does a better job of sealing against moisture). Recently refinished the stock on my Garand using tung. To reduce the thickness and speed the drying I made up a solution of 50% tung and 50% citrus solvent.

    Applied 2 coats and once all dried I applied a couple coats of Howards feed-n-wax. Came out real nice.

    Rainier42 Have some pics of your Garand with its new finish to share?

    My SG HRA order from CMP is still a month out, and Im looking for refinish ideas.
    Danny

  10. #10
    Deadeye
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    Re: Boiled linseed oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Rowdy
    Quote Originally Posted by Rainier42
    Quote Originally Posted by 186 Tmanbuckhunter
    You can add as many as you like. Boiled linseed oil does not fill the grain, but it does seal it. It will shed water but the open pores that aren't filled can still accept dirt and grime. Usually wait 24 hours inbetween coats, but don't let it fool you; once you rub in a coat its dry to the touch after taking all the excess off... letting it cure over night or longer is the trick. If too many coats are added it will bleed in the sun and you will def know if you screwed up, and its always a good idea to wait a good while before you take it out in the sun anyways. Boiled linseed oil does not get glossy unless you sand up to 1200 grit and get a real soft almost mirror finish type of wood... and even then it wont be glossy like a fresh coat of tru-oil, gloss poly, or gloss epoxy. Just take the bottle, put your hand over the top, turn it over and get some on your palm and then rub it in. Rub for about 5 minutes on each side thoroughly, wash your hands or wipe them off then go rub it for another 5 or so, then wipe the excess off with a soft lint free type of cloth.




    If you want a glossy finish and something that will fill the grain with enough coats, use true tung oil although its kind of thick and can be messy. You can also try minwax tung oil finish which is tung oil with different chemicals added in and it dries faster, and with enough coats gets glossy. Most of this stuff is just about how many coats you apply but boiled linseed oil is the easiest finish to apply.

    EDIT: Oh yeah one more note. If you're going to stain, don't use a minwax stain. Minwax stains are oil based and even when you wipe the excess off and let the stock or wood dry thorougly, when you go to rub on a coat of blo it will take a lot of the stain off and lighten the stock up not to mention it will be on your hands it can ruin it... use a rit dye stain.
    I you are not 100% committed to BLO, I like tung oil a little better (does a better job of sealing against moisture). Recently refinished the stock on my Garand using tung. To reduce the thickness and speed the drying I made up a solution of 50% tung and 50% citrus solvent.

    Applied 2 coats and once all dried I applied a couple coats of Howards feed-n-wax. Came out real nice.

    Rainier42 Have some pics of your Garand with its new finish to share?

    My SG HRA order from CMP is still a month out, and Im looking for refinish ideas.
    Rowdy,

    I will post some picks for you. In the mean time, I found the link below helpful in refinishing my stock:

    http://www.odcmp.org/new_forum/topic...TOPIC_ID=64242

    What I did differently from the above is I didn't use oven cleaner on the wood, but used murphy's oil soap for an initial cleaning instead. Also, I didn't steam out any of the nicks/dents ... none were too bad and felt that they part of the personality of the rifle.

    Purchased tung oil and citrus solvent from:

    http://www.realmilkpaint.com/

    Beware that Minwax Tung Oil finish has very little tung oil in it and contains varnish.

    This link is useful for a detailed strip:

    http://www.civilianmarksmanship.com/

    R


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