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Thread: Sear Fix to Lighten Trigger Pull



  1. #11
    Gun Wizard
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    Quote Originally Posted by golfersa View Post
    ... and if I screw it up I'll have an excuse to buy a Happy Trigger
    You can go the Happy Trigger route or you can just order a new sear for $13 from MIDWAYUSA!!!


    GB45
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by galatin View Post
    Anyone try to measure the angle of the marlin vs. the ww trigger at the sear? I was thinking of a setup like a Veritas honing guide for chisels and planes, or am I over engineering again?
    I never saw a need to spend the $90 for the Happy Trigger so can't tell you about the difference in the angles. A honing guide would be good but mounting the sear at the proper angle and keeping it parallel would be the trick. I am an engineer and that is why the simple vice turned out to be such a simple solution. It keeps the sear perfectly parallel and sliding the diamond stone across the top surface of the vice also maintains the parallelism. If I bought a Happy Trigger for all my Marlins I would have had to spend almost $2000.00. I would much rather spend ZERO DOLLARS and have done them all myself..... Actually I bought 2 extra sears for about $8 each just in case I messed one up and those two are still in my gun kit!!!!! Like everything else Marlin parts are going up and those sears are now around $15 each.


    GB45
    "The beauty of the second amendment is that it will not be needed until they try to take it away."
    "Now that Obama won again we shall see if this statement becomes reality" GB45

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  3. #13
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    I just finished doing this to two of my Marlins and I just can't believe the difference!

    I've posted here numerous times about my 35 that has accuracy issues and that I attribute about half of it to a hefty trigger pull. Well let me tell you, I don't have a trigger scale but I can almost guarantee that it went from 9 or 10 down to about 2 or 3 pounds. And smooooooth? Yea baby! Like GB45, I couldn't just do one and had to try a second one. That one came out even better than the first.

    The first one I did with a file and a hard Arkansas stone that I picked up at a yard sale a while back. Nice little stick about 1/4" square and about 4 inches long. Looks like a piece of key stock. I tried the vice thing but my vice is too big so instead, I put the sear in a pair of 6" vice grips and did it free hand. Took some figuring to get things right but finally got to where I was able to use the tip of my thumb as a guide for the file and being very careful to keep the file squared up took it a little at a time. I had the jewelers loup like mentioned in the first post and it really helped. I kept it slow and cautious and it went well.

    On the second one, I went and got my 5 stone Lansky set and used that instead of the file. Started with extra course to set the angle then went all the way down to extra fine. I also used the little 1/4" square Arkansas to polish the notch in the hammer just a tiny bit. Not more than 15 or 20 stokes probably but I could feel it catching the stone at first and after whatever # of strokes (I didn't really count, just guessing) it suddenly got smooth so I think there was definitely a bit of a burr there.

    I ended up doing it all over again though because I didn't change the angle quite enough. The picture you posted GB45 really helped but I was being cautious on the angle. The second time I took a tiny bit more angle off, did all the same steps and like I said, it came out better than the first one. What I was going for was about half way between the original bevel and square so I ended up still having some backset to the angles but less than factory angle.

    So, now I've only got about 6 more to do...
    CrunchBerries likes this.

  4. #14
    Site Contributor Gun Wizard
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    This thread is worth way more than I paid for it!
    Dave Bulla likes this.
    "I come from a state that raises corn and cotton and cockleburs and Democrats, and frothy eloquence neither convinces nor satisfies me. I am from Missouri. You have got to show me." Willard Duncan Vandiver

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  5. #15
    Tenderfoot
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    Help! : )

    Good Stuff. One question, How do you determine what the NEW angle needs to be I want to give this a try before buying the happy trigger.

  6. #16
    Marlin Marksman
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    Don't really need a number, just go about half as sharp as the original. Did you look at the pictures?

  7. #17
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    Well, left to my own devices I can be dangerous but I gave this a shot anyway. The angles on my vise didn't lend themselves to GB's hold with his vise jaws so I clamped a straight-edge to the side of the vise and went about trying to cut the angles using that straight edge for a control point. I just adjusted (wrongly so as it turned out more than once) according to what I thought needed to come off... heavy or just a little bit. I did five rifles, for without too much issue, but the problem was doing one rifle 4 or 5 times. I guess my eyes don't do a good job judging the angle I'm approaching at because I went from 4.5lbs to 1.5lbs in one adjustment. I lost count how many approaches I took on that one, going back and forth from too heavy to too light.

    Trigger work (1a).jpg Trigger work (2).jpg Trigger work (3).jpg


    I have most rifles hovering around 3lbs now, between what I've done and what JB did at the cabin a couple years ago. But my difficult one, unfortunately an 1893, which started out as my second to heaviest trigger is now probably too light and I'm afraid to keep whitteling at it. I've been all over the map with it.

    What would my esteemed brethren consider too light? Right now I'm setting at 2lbs, very consistent and pretty crisp. I like it but wondering if its a little imprudent.

    Also, anyone worry about the hardness of this edge after filing or stoning?
    CrunchBerries likes this.
    John

  8. #18
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    SgtDog0311,

    You asked in your pm about how light my trigger pull was. I just did the best I could with primitive methods using a piece of wire, a walmart bag and several cans of soup and tomato paste. The soup cans were 14.5 oz and the tomato paste was 8 oz. None of the guns would hold two soup cans, all could hold a soup can and a tomato can but one could just baaaarely hold it. Just the tiniest movement of anything would set it off. I also compared using a scale for weighing fish and it was fairly close. Bottom line is my lightest triggers are in the 1.5 pound range and the heaviest is about 1.75 lb. All of them pass any bump check or half cock check I can come up with.

    Honestly, I didn't think they were quite that light but I'm pretty used to fairly light triggers having owned several fairly high end target guns. These triggers feel GREAT to me compared to what they were before. They still have some perceptible movement before they break but they are so smooth that unless I am deliberately trying to feel it, I don't really notice it. What I need to do next is do a trigger job to one of my Marlins but measure the before and after. I also want to measure as soon as I get the new angle set with the coarse stone to see what it feels like at the new angle but still "in the rough". This stage might be closer to what some members might end up with if they do not have a good selection of sharpening stones to work through. I did spend a fair bit of time working all of mine down to an extra fine hard Arkansas stone so the ones that I've already done are quite smoothly polished. I might also try just honing the existing angle down to hard a Arkansas polish and see what the factory angle with a good polish breaks at. I suspect that if it is around 5 or 6 pounds to start, I might get to 4 or less without changing the angle but maybe not.

    Those of you who read my past posts on this where I said I reduce the angle about 50% may wish to go less than that to start out. I personally plan to continue as I already did because I like where it ends up and they do pass my safety checks. Just be advised, I am NOT a professional gunsmith so you are on your own when it comes right down to it. No reason to be afraid of the task, but always reason to be AWARE of what you are doing.,
    Last edited by Dave Bulla; 01-04-2014 at 04:26 PM.
    SgtDog0311 likes this.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Bulla View Post
    SgtDog0311,

    You asked in your pm about how light my trigger pull was. I just did the best I could with primitive methods using a piece of wire, a walmart bag and several cans of soup and tomato paste. The soup cans were 14.5 oz and the tomato paste was 8 oz. None of the guns would hold two soup cans, all could hold a soup can and a tomato can but one could just baaaarely hold it. Just the tiniest movement of anything would set it off. I also compared using a scale for weighing fish and it was fairly close. Bottom line is my lightest triggers are in the 1.5 pound range and the heaviest is about 1.75 lb. All of them pass any bump check or half cock check I can come up with.

    Honestly, I didn't think they were quite that light but I'm pretty used to fairly light triggers having owned several fairly high end target guns. These triggers feel GREAT to me compared to what they were before. They still have some perceptible movement before they break but they are so smooth that unless I am deliberately trying to feel it, I don't really notice it. What I need to do next is do a trigger job to one of my Marlins but measure the before and after. I also want to measure as soon as I get the new angle set with the coarse stone to see what it feels like at the new angle but still "in the rough". This stage might be closer to what some members might end up with if they do not have a good selection of sharpening stones to work through. I did spend a fair bit of time working all of mine down to an extra fine hard Arkansas stone so the ones that I've already done are quite smoothly polished. I might also try just honing the existing angle down to hard a Arkansas polish and see what the factory angle with a good polish breaks at. I suspect that if it is around 5 or 6 pounds to start, I might get to 4 or less without changing the angle but maybe not.

    Those of you who read my past posts on this where I said I reduce the angle about 50% may wish to go less than that to start out. I personally plan to continue as I already did because I like where it ends up and they do pass my safety checks. Just be advised, I am NOT a professional gunsmith so you are on your own when it comes right down to it. No reason to be afraid of the task, but always reason to be AWARE of what you are doing.,
    Hey thanks for adding this Dave. I put the stock back on and tightened all the screws and found that I'm sitting just under 2 lbs now. Not sure why it dropped an 1/8th or maybe even a 1/4 lb with those changes but it did. Consistent too. Think I'm gonna stay there even though it's lighter than my 3 lb triggers. And I may do a little more polishing like you. Ideally I'd probably like to be at 2.5 lbs. I do like a light trigger and I'm not hunting with that 1893 - or have no plans to anyway. I'll see what I think after having it out next time for a 100 rounds or so. And of course I'll do all the saftey bumps, pushing and pulling again too that you GB45 and swany recommended. Big change from 5 lbs. My 45 Colt was 5.5 lbs. I'm anxious to go give that a try out now. Thanks Again!!
    John

  10. #20
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    Well, I got about 8 done. Still have a few that are at 3.5lbs and I may take the time to bump them down now that I'm getting a little better at guessing the angle to apply. Still pretty hard for me to get in that window between 2 lbs and 2.75 labs on the first try.

    I did come across this from my XLR... looked to be the factory finish as the machine markes go too far under the catch edge to have been done by bubba... but dang I think bubba got a job adjusting the machinery. The picture does not do the terrible machining justice. Almost looked like a dull edge that was actually ripping metal off rather than cutting it clean.

    Didn't think to take the pictures until I'd taken down the roughest edges with a file. Had trouble getting the iphone camera to focus.
    XLR Hammer (2).jpg XLR Hammer.jpg
    John


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