View Poll Results: POLL: Have you ever experienced any of the following? Check all that apply.

Voters
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  • PERSONALLY experienced an accidental discharge when a half cocked lever gun was dropped?

    1 0.34%
  • Know SOMEONE ELSE who experienced an accidental discharge on a half cocked lever gun that was dropped?

    1 0.34%
  • Just heard stories about a guy who knew a guy etc who had an accidental discharge of a half cocked lever gun?

    28 9.40%
  • NEVER heard of an actual accidental discharge occuring on a half cocked lever gun.

    115 38.59%
  • Never carry one in the chamber with hammer at half cock.

    19 6.38%
  • Always or often carry one in the chamber and hammer at half cock.

    134 44.97%
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  1. #1
    Marlin Marksman
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    POLL: accidental discharge of half cocked, non safety lever guns.

    Just been on a thread where it was asked "how do you carry" your non safety lever gun and it was mentioned how carrying one in the chamber could be dangerous because of the old "You could drop the gun on the hammer and make it go off." line that I've heard all my life.

    I got to thinking that we have quite a pool of lever gun guys here with thousands of members most of who own multiple lever guns and spend a LOT of hours either shooting or hunting. I've heard the stories all my life about how you could drop a hammer gun and have it go off accidentally and perhaps it is true if fully cocked but thinking about how a rifle would have to fall "just so" and how normally, the butt stock would be the first thing to hit the ground if the rifle was falling in a direction where a blow to the hammer would be in the right direction to break the sear I just keep thinking that a HALF cocked rifle would in reality be very difficult to accidentally discharge.

    However... in keeping an open mind, I figure it might be interesting to do a poll. Looking for personal experience, second hand stories or even vague stories and also asking how you personally carry your non safety lever gun.

    Feel free to click all that apply or to comment.

    I'd be especially interested in FIRST HAND incidents if any have occurred and the details of those would be welcome.

    Lets see what all those thousands of Marlins carried by the thousands of members have experienced eh?
    Thoughts on Remlins: The day I walk into a sporting goods and honestly mistake a Remlin gun for a JM gun, THAT will be the day I think about buying one. Until then, they can keep 'em.

    Words to live by: Just because something is primitive, doesn't mean it has to be crude. Just because something is custom, doesn't mean it's quality.

  2. #2
    gcs
    gcs is offline
    Wrangler
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    Re: POLL: accidental discharge of half cocked, non safety lever guns.

    I've never had an accidental discharge, but I don't generally throw a gun around, so could it happen? Don't know for sure.
    The easiest way to get an AD, I think, is when you are letting the hammer down to half cock and it slips off your thumb just right due to cold fingers, ill fitting glove or more likely trying to access the hammer obstructed by a scope especially without a offset hammer spur. Even then, all the planets would have to be aligned just right.

  3. #3
    Cowpoke
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    Re: POLL: accidental discharge of half cocked, non safety lever guns.

    I wouldn't trust my custom triggers enough without a cross bolt safety.

    I'd probably carry half cocked with the lever cracked.

  4. #4
    Deadeye
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    Re: POLL: accidental discharge of half cocked, non safety lever guns.

    Don't drop it. Don't point it in a direction dangerous to anyone. Don't point at anything you don't want to shoot. As long as these 3 300 year old rules are followed, anything from a flintlock to an AR -15 is as safe as a shovel.

  5. #5
    Deadeye
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    Re: POLL: accidental discharge of half cocked, non safety lever guns.

    Quote Originally Posted by gcs
    I've never had an accidental discharge, but I don't generally throw a gun around, so could it happen? Don't know for sure.
    The easiest way to get an AD, I think, is when you are letting the hammer down to half cock and it slips off your thumb just right due to cold fingers, ill fitting glove or more likely trying to access the hammer obstructed by a scope especially without a offset hammer spur. Even then, all the planets would have to be aligned just right.
    If you take your finger off of the trigger before easing the hammer down, it can't fire. The hammer will stop at the half-cock position.
    '08 1894ss .44 magnum
    '88 336CS .30-30
    '80 1894C .357 magnum
    '69 336 .30-30
    Select a rifle...in the 30-30 class, picking the action that feels the best in the hands and that one happens to like...for no one will handle a rifle at its best unless he has a sincere liking for it. Larry Koller

  6. #6
    Gunfighter
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    Re: POLL: accidental discharge of half cocked, non safety lever guns.

    I carry all my non saftey levers chambered and half cocked when spotting stalking. You just never know how the thing is gonna go down, if you stumbled close to something i think running the lever makes too much noise. On the same hand when rifle hunting with the dogs I just don't chamber any rounds because you're running through the brush falling down half the time. when i do carry these rifles chambered and half cocked I still would never point them at anyone or anything I couldn't afford to buy or replace. I have never heard of one of the safteys malfunctioning when dropped...... Doesn't mean it has not happened though. If you are going to carry chambered just follow the basic gun saftey rules and I believe that will eliminate most issues. I'm not sure about dropping the older levers, just never seen it happen. I wouldn't want to try it.
    336 Texan 30-30
    1894 44mag
    Mod 60 22lr
    Glenfield Mod. 30A 30-30
    1895GS 45-70
    336 SDT 30-30
    1895G 45-70
    in the order received... all JM stamped.

    Remlins:
    Remlin XS7 308 shortened to 16.5" by brockmans, Boyds prairie hunter stock.

  7. #7
    Platinum Poster
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    Re: POLL: accidental discharge of half cocked, non safety lever guns.

    Levers being popular here for decades never heard of issues until I got on the net about them.. and I am sure most are missing some of the whole story involved with accidental discharges.. same as guns blowing up .. reloads used ..

    I agree with Jake if alter the rifle then you need to assume full responsiblility for it.. ..

    Accually the only accidental dischage I have seen was a bolt.. somehow going through brush the saftey was knocked off.. while the person was crossing a fence they reached back to unshoulder the gun instead of grabbing the sling and hit the trigger.. shot was about 3'' from their head.. I don't ever take the saftey for granted .. and check them regularly .. even during the day.. ... I for one like the cbs. and use it..
    Gunjunkie..

    "Arbitrary power is most easily established on the ruins of liberty abused to licentiousness." --George Washington

  8. #8
    Marlin Marksman
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    Re: POLL: accidental discharge of half cocked, non safety lever guns.

    Years ago there was a local accidental shooting death that allegedly involved a halfocked 94 that fell over from its resting spot in the corner of a room and fired. Turned out it was on full cock, the owner had done a "trigger job" on it, and the doggone thing would barely stay cocked on its own, fall or no fall. This discovery was made by the State Law Enforcement Division lab after the family of the deceased had hired a lawyer to sue Winchester, but before the suit got filed. After that, it never did get filed.

    When hunting, I almost always have a round chambered in my 336s, with the rifle halfcocked. If I have to climb over-under-around an obstacle, or if I am climbing in or out of a treestand, I unload the chamber in deference to the very slim chance that a drop and an unlucky just-so hit on a rock could break the halfcock notch. The nature of deer hunting around here makes jacking a round in to the chamber upon sighting a deer totally unrealistic -- heck, ranges are usually short enough that you have to be slow and careful just cocking the hammer, lest the deer hear it and bolt.
    Pisgah
    ------------------
    "He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the LORD require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?" Micah 6:8

  9. #9
    Sidewinder
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    Re: POLL: accidental discharge of half cocked, non safety lever guns.

    Not listed as an option, Last deer season I was standing 8 feet away from a lady loading her presafety Marlin. Her father and I were doing the same with our crossbolt safeties and had just jacked one into our chambers. She did the same but as she was easing the hammer to half cock it fired. She was following all other gun safety rules thankfully and the round went off in a harmless direction. If for no other reason, I like the CBS for loading and unloading. Cold fingers or warm gloves...the hammer can get away from some people.
    NRA Life Member

  10. #10
    Army Veteran 67-69 Korea Administrator
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    Re: POLL: accidental discharge of half cocked, non safety lever guns.

    I have seen a couple of pre 64 Winchesters that would go off if you pulled the trigger hard enough. One was a 92 and the other a 94.

    Marlins I've never seen it happen, unless someone put it in a state of "FALSE HALF COCK"

    I have a 336A made in 1949 as such is has no trigger block safety, no cross bolt safety, I have installed a one piece firing pin, that defeats the two piece pin. The triggers pull has been reduced to 2.5 lbs. The only device for safety while a round in the chamber is the half cock.

    I load my rifles chamber through the ejection port, I then engage the half cock, then load the rest of the tube magazine.

    I feel safe with this gun loaded in any situation. I do not lend it out.

    Bottom line. Accidental discharge of a levergun is operator error, or a convenient excuse.
    God Bless Our Troops -- Retired Tool & Die Maker -- The center of an Aspirin is the same size as the center of the moon, aim for the center.


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