+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12


  1. #1
    Wrangler
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    People's Republic of Maryland
    Posts
    269
    Member #
    3074
    Thanked
    105 times

    hornady rifle loads for .357 Magnum

    Just got my new Hornady reloading manual and some 158 gr. FP/XTP bullets for my 1894C. To my surprise and extreme pleasure, I see they have listed .357 Mag rifle loading. I have been just working with manuals listing handgun loads for this caliber. I am looking forward to working up some powerful loads for the little marlin and seeing what this thing can do.
    Marlin 1894C .357 Magnum (pre-Remlin)
    Team 1894 Member #238

    "Are you gonna pull those pistols or whistle Dixie?"
    -The Outlaw Josey Wales

  2. #2
    Site Contributor Contributing Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    2,233
    Member #
    150
    Thanked
    460 times

    hornady rifle loads for .357 Magnum

    So what was their "rifle" listing? I suspect it will look remarkably similar to a handgun listing.

  3. #3
    Army Veteran 67-69 Korea Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Howard City, Mich
    Posts
    19,172
    Member #
    178
    Thanked
    8595 times

    hornady rifle loads for .357 Magnum

    The following load is safe in my 94CB and should be worked up to with caution and personal regards for safety. Don't use if you feel it is unsafe according to your loading manual. It is very devastating on whitetail deer.
    Note that I use small rifle primers in all my loads, the reason is simple I don't want two primers of the same physical size on my reloading bench and they work fine for me, and they are physically and chemically stronger.

    Hornady 158gn XTP HP
    CCI400 small rifle primers.
    Federal .357 mag unplated cases.
    16gns 2400.
    God Bless Our Troops -- Retired Tool & Die Maker -- The center of an Aspirin is the same size as the center of the moon, aim for the center.

  4. #4
    High Priest of the Powder Hoarders Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Coastal Missouri across the water from The PRI.
    Posts
    17,034
    Member #
    287
    Thanked
    6707 times

    hornady rifle loads for .357 Magnum

    I've been collecting load data for my favorite calibers since I started reloading in the early 80's, and several powder/bullet companies have published seperate sections of data for the same cartridge, broken down into rifle and pistol data. Most of the time the data shown is the same, or they use faster powders for the pistol data, and the "magnum" powders in the rifles. I've always gravitated to the powders in the middle, slower than Unique but faster than 2400, something like Blue Dot or AA-7. The idea was to have one load for my rifle AND revolver, but in practice, one gun always liked it better than the other. Meaning one shot it well, and the other gun HATED it. :cry:

    These days I load for consistency, more than velocity, and I'm still learning about matching the bullet to the powder and velocity from guys like Jerry Lester. Everyone approaches reloading from a slightly different direction, and forums like this are still helping me learn more about reloading, 25 years after I started. There's an awful lot of garbage on the internet, but there's also a vast wealth of knowledge and experience! I just leave my BS detector turned on, and I usually do okay.

    But as my dearly-departed favorite writer Dean Grennell said many years ago, "When you start extrapolating data and venturing into experimental ballistics, several large buckets of snakes slither onto the scene." :shock:

    It's funny, but it's also VERY true.

    Papajohn
    "There is a fine line between a hobby and Mental Illness". Dave Barry

    Team 1894 #4
    Team 45-70 #847

  5. #5
    Site Contibutor Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Norwalk, CT
    Posts
    12,095
    Member #
    64
    Thanked
    447 times

    hornady rifle loads for .357 Magnum

    Swany,
    Do your primers get flattened?

    Mine get flat above 13 grains 2400. I'v gone to 15.5 & back down. 12.5 gives me 1500+- from my Rossi & 1894C. At 12.5 theyre just starting to iron out.
    I'm considering working back up with a small rifle primer. They work fine in my 32/20, cant see why they'd be bad in the 357.

    I'm suprised Hodgdons didn't try Lilgun.n It seems to produce less pressure & keep velocity up. I shot some today loaded a 158 gr RemSP over 16 grains & a mag primer & got 1750+- but a big extreme spread. 100 fps in the 1894C.
    The primers werent flattemed like the 2400 & I'm going to up it 1/2 & 1 grain next time around. The max listed is 18 in Hodgdons.
    Ken,

    http://photobucket.com/albums/a186/Leverdude/
    Team 1894 member#146
    Team 45/70 member#458
    Freedoms not free!
    Support your NRA!

  6. #6
    Army Veteran 67-69 Korea Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Howard City, Mich
    Posts
    19,172
    Member #
    178
    Thanked
    8595 times

    hornady rifle loads for .357 Magnum

    With all components as listed and Federal cases primers were on the verge starting to flatten.

    When I switched to RP or Win cases 16gns was a no no, as far as physical pressure signs on the primers.

    I like the combo hunting, for general shooting I use 11.5gns and bulk 158gn jacketed HPs, far as 2400 is concerned I have run up to 20gns with 110gn XTP HPs but the bark and bite got bad, and primers were really flattened though accuracy was good.
    God Bless Our Troops -- Retired Tool & Die Maker -- The center of an Aspirin is the same size as the center of the moon, aim for the center.

  7. #7
    High Priest of the Powder Hoarders Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Coastal Missouri across the water from The PRI.
    Posts
    17,034
    Member #
    287
    Thanked
    6707 times

    hornady rifle loads for .357 Magnum

    I've often thought about using small rifle primers in some of the warmer loads, but I don't want to increase pressures, and rifle primers have more "Brisance", meaning they generally burn longer and hotter. On top of that, most 357 brass has primer pockets cut for pistol primers, and rifle primers tend to run about .003 taller, meaning if you don't seat them properly, you can wind up with high primers, never a good thing. Properly seated pistol primers, (according to Ed Matunas, who ought to know) should be .003" to .005" below flush, so technically speaking, you can use rifle primers in the pockets without the risk of a high primer. I've never tried it, at least not recently, so I'm curious whether you need to mash the rifle primers in, or if they seat fully without warping the primer body and anvil. Do some brands of brass have consistently deeper pockets?

    I know at one time some 357 brass was made for rifle primers, but I'm thinking that hasn't been done for awhile.

    Any thoughts from Ed, or perhaps the Esteemed Mr. Lester?

    Papajohn the Cautiously Intrepid
    "There is a fine line between a hobby and Mental Illness". Dave Barry

    Team 1894 #4
    Team 45-70 #847

  8. #8
    Site Contributor Contributing Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    2,233
    Member #
    150
    Thanked
    460 times

    hornady rifle loads for .357 Magnum

    I believe large rifle are taller than large pistol, but small rifle and small pistol are the same size.

  9. #9
    Site Contibutor Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Norwalk, CT
    Posts
    12,095
    Member #
    64
    Thanked
    447 times

    hornady rifle loads for .357 Magnum

    Quote Originally Posted by imashooter2
    I believe large rifle are taller than large pistol, but small rifle and small pistol are the same size.
    Yep.

    I measured some & thats what I come up with. My primer pocket uniformer is the same too. LR is deeper, LP, SP & SR are all the same depth. Course a LP is fat like a LR primer.

    Anyway,
    I use published low end data in my 32/20 model 1889 & it calls for a SR primer using 7 grains I think of 2400 under a 110 grain bullet. Might be 115.

    So I dont know why I couldn't start over useing a SR primer in my 357 carbine loads. If the velocity is crazy I'll stop. That 32/20 is right with the data tho.

    John,
    Lemme ask you. Do you find your primers flattening out on high end 357 loads?

    I'm new, I think you know to this reloading thing.
    Most of my learning has been with rifle loads. I'v loaded some pretty heavy 45/70 stuff as well as a bunch of others some up near or at max & NEVER got a flattened out primer. 357 tho, the only load I use a pistol primer in, I get flat primers before max. They were flatter than any rifle load I ever built today with only 12.5 grains of 2400 under a 158 Rem.
    Shot fine, no problems but they were starting to flatten. 2 guns too, a Rossi & a 1894C I shot for the first time today. I was starting to blame the Rossi but now I have another & its the same.
    Are pistol primers that much softer?
    Ken,

    http://photobucket.com/albums/a186/Leverdude/
    Team 1894 member#146
    Team 45/70 member#458
    Freedoms not free!
    Support your NRA!

  10. #10
    Wrangler
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Hiwassee VA
    Posts
    355
    Member #
    38
    Thanked
    4 times

    hornady rifle loads for .357 Magnum

    I've tried Small rifle primers(standard) in 357 magnums intended for my 1894C. Of course considering the fact that primer heights do vary between rifle, and pistol, I measued them first with my mic's. The small rifle, and small pistol primers "are" very close, but if you'll measure a few brands, and even lots between brands with mic's, not calipers, you'll find out that in some instances, the rifle primers are indeed higher when seated, even in small pistol varieties.

    I've settled on CCI 550's for all my small pistol magnum needs. These are absolutely the most consistent not only in size, but also in ignition, and cup hardness. Winchesters are also pretty consistent on cup hardness, and height, but sometimes vary to a degree(sometimes causing erratic velocities with magnum loads) on ignition. Federals are OK on hardness, but can vary some on height, and considerably on ignition. I know that Remington primers are very popular, but they've been all over the map on all three counts for me no matter if they're large, or small, rifle, or pistol.

    I stick with the CCI 550's in nearly every 357 load I put together, even light loads. If I'm needing a standard 357 primer, I use CCI 500's. As for my brass, I've been using Starline exclusively in all my handgun loads for a long time. Again, it all boils down to consistency. Starline will positively give you the most consistent loads every time, even when switching to different lots of brass. Federal, when you can find it is also very consistent, but is pretty soft, usually showing pressure signs prematurely compared to all other brands. Winchester is a crap shoot as far as being consistent, and Remington is not only thinner than most other pistol brass, but with it, you might get two or three lots that are virtually identical, then a lot that's so far off that velocity, and pressures either spike, or drop very dramatically which can be dangerous if you're not on guard.

    On the 2400, I'm not really too fond of it in rifle loads for the 357 magnum. It tends to burn dirty, and velocities spreads can vary extremely bad even with all other factors being perfect. For actual "full house" magnum loads in the 357, especially in a rifle, you'll never beat Lil' Gun, H-110, or Winchester 296. You can also get good results with AA-9, but velocities top out around 1600-1700 fps in rifles with 158g bullets, which is fine for the 158g XTP-FP's, but bullets like the 158g Remington SP will perform very well on deer sized critters up to at least 2000 fps making the AA-9 less than ideal in my opinion.

    Sorry so long winded. Just trying to address all the high points here.
    quealing rabbit, sneaking predator, 357 rifle, and frozen fingers. It just don't get no better than this!


Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New | Subscribed Threads

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Search tags for this page

.357 magnum rifle loads
,

357 mag rifle loads

,
357 magnum rifle load data
,

357 magnum rifle loads

,
357 magnum rifle reloading data
,
357 rifle load data
,
357mag rifle hand loads
,
hand loads for 357 magnum rifle
,
heavy 357 bullets for reloading
,
how to reload for 357 mag rifles
,
reloading .357 magnum for rifle
,
reloading 357 magnum carbine
,
reloading data for 357 magnum rifle
Click on a term to search for related topics.